Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
22 June 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
15 June 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
10 June 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
03 June 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
01 June 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
25 May 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
16 May 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
10 May 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
07 May 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
05 May 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
02 May 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
26 April 2021 | St Marys
21 April 2021 | St Marys
18 April 2021 | St Marys
11 April 2021 | St Marys
09 April 2021 | St Marys
02 April 2021 | St Marys
28 March 2021 | St Marys
18 March 2021 | St Marys
14 March 2021 | St Marys
Recent Blog Posts
22 June 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD

Claudette Kicks Butt

Recently the NY Jets traded away their quarterback, Sam Darnold, to the Carolina Panthers. They then selected Zach Wilson at the #2 pick in the NFL draft. The Panthers meanwhile didn’t select a quarterback in the draft and traded away their previous starting quarterback, Teddy Bridgewater. As a [...]

15 June 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD

Another Memorial

The internet at the marina has been intermittent and so I can only post on the blog every now and then. Perhaps my external wifi adapter is intermittent.

10 June 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD

Burger Eve

After two days of stomach flu and feeling poorly I finally felt better and attended Red Shell Shanty’s Friday event with pulled pork and slaw as the daily special. I had a few Orange Crushes, after all, vitamin C helps with these viruses. The next day I felt ill again and spent most of the day onboard [...]

03 June 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD

GIMP Vomit

I was puttering around, raised the genoa again with the new halyard to see if it wrapped like the old one, it did. I also noted how high on the mast I had to mount the halyard restrainer. Maybe 6 inches from the halyard sheave. A cheap Chinese GPS speedometer arrived and I installed it in a blank [...]

01 June 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD

Memorable Memorial Day

Although the new release of Navigatrix 64bit installs properly (navigatrix.net), I was unable to get the cheap Realtek based wifi adapter to work. The internal wifi works. The marina’s wifi is weak and needs the external USB antenna for a connection. When I was in the boatyard I needed the USB antenna [...]

25 May 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD

Crisfield Preseason

Pizza Night. Not to be. We were at the Red Shell Shanty on Friday for their seasonal opening. Saturday was supposed to be Quesadillas at CM’s mom’s house, but the chef was too tired and we went to Fisherman’s Grille, formerly Cap’n Tylers. The next night was the Quesadillas and tequila drinks. [...]

Claudette Kicks Butt

22 June 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
Cap'n Chef Andy | Tropical Depression Remnants
Recently the NY Jets traded away their quarterback, Sam Darnold, to the Carolina Panthers. They then selected Zach Wilson at the #2 pick in the NFL draft. The Panthers meanwhile didn’t select a quarterback in the draft and traded away their previous starting quarterback, Teddy Bridgewater. As a Jets fan, I wanted to evaluate these moves, but there are a lot of YouTube videos with a lot of fanfare, but not much real information. Mostly they are regurgitating information from other internet sites. I was really trying to get more detailed information and I found it at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGfxHp2yuimtLsFaq1r7aIQ. This site has very detailed analysis of the quarterback position, especially college athletes. If you want to know more about details of quarterback play and defensive schemes, this is your go-to place.
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Chagrined that I had left my electrical tool box back in Georgia, I ordered a kit from Amazon which includes crimper and stripper/cutter. We’ll see how it stacks up when it gets here. I also ordered another wifi adapter as a spare. I keep having my adapter crash on deck and even left it out in the rain. It won’t last long under my care. It’s amazing it still works. Also the internet in the marina is spotty. I remembered to also order a pair of 7X50 binoculars, Celestron, cheap and good.
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The electric bos’un’s chair was now working so I decided to go up the mast, with some trepidation. This is a dangerous contraption which is OK when all is working fine, but bad things can happen. I use a separate harness and safety line, but if I fall backwards I could fall out of that too. It’s somewhat of a job to bring the chair, battery, bucket of tools, cordless drill, harness, sort out the halyards, and then bravely go up. What happened was it got increasingly difficult to go up as I got near the spreaders and higher. The hoist line was twisting so it was rubbing on itself and making it hard to keep the chair level. Other problems might be chaffing the line and overloading the winch and the little brick battery I was using. I ended up back on deck, none the worse for wear, but toady’s session was over. I put the battery back on charge.
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I was headed for the showers when I saw the owner of the skipjack I had watched sail into the marina a few days ago. He goes out regularly and as good as the boat looks from a distance, up close it is as pristine as a fine piano. Beautiful. He built the boat himself, he’s Danish. Glad to speak with him. His boat was designed by J. R. Benford.
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I didn’t arrive here last season until into September and then left on Election Day. Got a lot of work done then and felt that I wasn’t doing enough, now I feel the same way, but I have so much more time.
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Flushing the fuel out of the tank and the lines leading to the Atomic 4 have been kept at the back burner, just like fixing the fouled head, or other awful marine tasks. They are at the head of the list, but they implore us to do other things first, everything else will be done before clearing a clogged head.
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Finer Works, the art printer in San Antonio, had mistakenly printed two copies of a test print on the same canvas, I wanted it on two different kinds of canvas to compare. I had no use for the test print itself, I just chose a photo that would show what I wanted. When I told them they had printed on only one kind of canvas the said they would reprint and send me the other kind of canvas. They did so, but unbelievably it came in still printed on the same canvas type as the two previous test prints. I told them about it and they insisted on reprinting the reprint with emphasis on using the correct canvas. At this point I have 3 identical prints of a test photo.
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Cornelia Marie arrived for the weekend and thought we might replace the seat rails in the skiff. Sure, why not, the old ones had rotten spots and were screwed to the inside of the boat with screws from the outside, they would probably fall right off when we removed the screws. Then just drill pilot holes in the new rails, screw them in, then screw down the seats, done, should take about an hour.
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After removing the seats and the screws that held the rails to the boat, the rails just stayed put where they were. Aha, 5200 marine adhesive, hate that stuff. Impervious to most tools, solvents, and even heat won’t affect it much. The technique that evolved was to start at one end of the rail and try to get a pry bar or screwdriver to put some tension on the adhesive, then pass the multitool with either halfmoon blade or scraper blade for an inch or two away from the pry bar, cutting the top seam as well as from the bottom. The pry bar was moved down the line inch by inch. Another useful method is to drive a putty knife with a hammer from above. This took a lot of hammering.
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After removing one rail, 2 hours, we repaired to the Red Shell Shanty for Orange Crushes and split a 12” cheese steak with fried onions and peppers. Back to the porch to rest a bit. I said you know we could take out the other rail right now and be done with it. Do I really wanna? OK, we got the tools out. This is where I thought that heat might help, but it didn’t. The rail came out, just needed more scraping and hammering. The gelcoat had come off with the 5200 in places. CM wondered if we had made a mistake.
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The next day I used the angle grinder with flap disk to clean up the remaining 5200 and any discolored debris. I had the Wet Dry 700 epoxy that someone gave me and it proved perfect for this job. First the new rails, which were not wood but PVC, were put into position by screwing at each end, first drilling a pilot hole, then screwing. Then the rest of the pilot holes were drilled for each screw. A couple of additional screws were added for strength. A mix of the epoxy, which comes out like a stiff paste, was spread onto the areas of bare fiberglass and also on the mating surface of the rails. The rails were smooth on one side and had fake wood grain on the other. I figured the wood grain would help the adhesive. The rails were screwed in place and any epoxy that oozed out was smoothed.
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We cleaned up, I showered and returned to the Red Shell Shanty for O.C.’s. Eve was there and soon CM showed up with Nori the Wonder Dog. Other mainstays of the dining cadre arrived and it was decided to to to CM’s mom’s house on the water near the Small Boat Harbor and have a dinner party. The ladies had prepared summer salads, excellent.
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The next morning I didn’t feel as bad as expected. I was out of water and biked to the city dock and then up to the grocers. I had a tailwind and floated along on the bike, effortless. On the way back it was difficult though. I had to stop to drink water and decided to rest at the Red Shell Shanty’s tent. Nice breeze when you’re not fighting it. The bistro was closed. My older daughter skyped me from England with good news.
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Her construction plans for her house in Oxford were approved after two years of struggle due to the pandemic and a disallowed dormer to be added to her upper story. She had sent a photo of her garden and there in the distance is a nearby house with a similar dormer. This time the argument was retorted by, “Of course those who object to this dormer would be looking at it from their own dormer.”
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The Celestron binoculars came in, 7X50’s, brand new, $40, and the view was bright and clear. Designed for stargazing. The electrical kit came in and it is very nice, new ratcheting crimper for compression terminals, additional crimping dies that I probably will never use, and a wire stripper/cutter. These tools are in a zippered flat pack. Price was about $35 from Amazon.
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It was that time of year for my annual physical, but my doctor is 3 hours away. I called and asked if we could do it remotely, the reply was yes, but it wouldn’t be a full physical, they called it telemed. They emailed me a blood work order and I looked on Google maps for a blood lab. I preferred one that I could bike to and it seemed unlikely that Crisfield would have a blood lab, I would probably have to go to Salisbury or maybe even farther. There was a medical building nearby and I called them. It is called something like Tidal Health. Yes, they could do blood lab work.
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The next day I biked there and it was like a small hospital. The nurse said something about me getting in early before the rain comes. When I returned to Sunsplash and made breakfast I looked at wunderground.com to see if rain was coming. Of course it was, the remnants of tropical depression Claudette, complete with small craft warning and forecast of winds up to 50 knots. I was unable to go to the grocers, the rain arrived so quickly. The wind began pummeling the marina. Sunsplash was rolling and bouncing around like at sea.
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Radio Bill had turned around on his voyage to Europe halfway to Bermuda and headed East, then South, and now was sailing Southwest into strong winds. Perhaps he is merely sidestepping this tropical disturbance. He is a radio expert and uses his High Frequency rig to download weather maps, he has good information and knows what is coming down the pike. He may however be returning to Georgia to repair something or may have decided the hurricane season is happening already, unsafe to transatlantic.
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A redundant wifi adapter came in, identical to the one I have been using. I wanted to find out if the intermittent internet was because of the adapter or because of the marina. It was the marina and when the internet is out it is much more difficult to post on the blog, so I hold off and keep writing until the blog post gets too big. Posting from the smart phone is a pain, but I guess it must be done.
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The image is of the storm clouds arriving with wind and rain.

Another Memorial

15 June 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
Cap'n Chef Andy | Perfect Weather
The internet at the marina has been intermittent and so I can only post on the blog every now and then. Perhaps my external wifi adapter is intermittent.
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After a late bike ride in the rain from Eve’s house to the marina, I awoke onboard Sunsplash with moderately damp clothing, and took it easy. The past few days have been some sort of stomach flu and then just flu like symptoms. But I was feeling better and decided to go up the mast and at least install the halyard restrainer, not much of a job, drill and tap for #10 fasteners, only two, and screw the restrainer to the mast.
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The big part of the job is getting the electric bos’un’s chair up on deck, a secondary safety harness, a bucket of required tools and parts, and the cordless drill. I procrastinated, am I really well enough to go aloft? When I tried out the bos’un’s chair it was dead. Go get the meter and my electrical tool box. Whoah, the electrical tool box isn’t here. Could I have left it in Georgia? It was one of the things on the top of my list to bring, I expected to be doing a lot of electrical work. After searching all over, which doesn’t take long on a 30 foot boat, I decided to use the tools in my 40 dollar Harbor Freight drawered plastic toolbox. It has a wire stripper/crimper and some crimp connectors.
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I had found that the battery voltage on the chair wasn’t getting to the winch motor. It has to pass through a simple control that has an up and a down button. The screws holding it together were corroded. I was able to remove 3 but had to drill out 2 others. After opening the control I could see a lot of rust and corrosion. The screws holding the wires to the control switch(es) were somewhat corroded. I was able to remove a few of them but a couple were frozen tight. The negative wire from the battery did not have continuity and it was one of the frozen screws. I ended up snapping it off, stripping the old connector off, crimping a new connector on the wire, and then screwing it down to another adjacent screw hole using a different screw. The other wires either had continuity or were scraped clean and screwed down again.
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When I opened the switch(es) four springs sprang out and I was able to find 3 of them. The fourth must have gone overboard. It was impossible to reassemble the switch(es) without retaining the springs somehow. I ended up using a little Gorilla glue to glue the springs onto the switches.
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The next day I tried to assemble the switch and test, but there was no action, I took it all apart again. It looked like the glue for the springs was enough that it kept the contacts from meeting. I began trimming the glue and another spring hit the deck. I assembled the switch with only two springs instead of the original four and it still worked. We would not be testing it out in the rain.
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It rained and rained. I was able to get to the showers and get a shower in a lapse in the rain. When I came out I decided to duck into the new boater’s lounge. This was the laundry room, but the washer and drier were gone. A big screen TV, remote, coffee table, and plush couch were there instead. Kind of like putting a living room in a phone booth. I was able to power up the big screen and watch an amazing tennis match. It had gone on for 2 hours before I began to watch. Rafa Nadal and Djokovic were tied at one set apiece and it was now in the 3rd set.
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I was rained in but enjoyed the highest level of tennis play that I have seen. For the next two hours every rally was contested at a level of physical expenditure that was unbelievable. These are like marathon runners who are also trying to thread the needle hitting a tennis ball. I am sure many exchanges of this match will be on YouTube.
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I made it to the boat and headed to the Red Shell Shanty. I was the only customer. It was still lightly raining but soon stopped. I had a crab cake and an Orange Crush. Everyone was socked in by the rain. I said to the lady at the bar, “They will start coming in now.” The bistro started filling up by ones and twos. Cornelia Marie and Nori, the Wonder Dog, came in from the wet weather and we had a drink. Outside it was dry and the sun was starting to set. We continued to talk over at the house and at the semi-hydroponic garden. Looks like a million tomatoes.
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An old friend, Cap’n Neil, was coming up to Crisfield to pay a visit on his way to a memorial service in Pennsylvania. The plan was to have pizza night at Eve’s house on Sunday. The day before we worked on CM’s outboard motor on her skiff. The problem was bad gas. We used a Baja filter funnel and ran all the gasoline through it. Sure enough, there was water in the fuel. The water sinks to the bottom of the tank where the pickup tube sucks it into the engine where it plugs up the carburetor. After cleaning the fuel from the tank we used the squeeze bulb to flush out the fuel line to the fuel pump and the motor’s water separation filter. We ended up with everything flushed out up to the carburetor. The carb was removed and disassembled. It was remarkably clean, the water that clogged it had probably evaporated.
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After reassembling the carb and motor we hooked up the fuel line and pumped the bulb to fill the engine with gas. A large garbage can full of water was put under the engine and the engine started right away but ran rough. I adjusted the idle needle valve but it didn’t help. We stopped the engine and removed the spark plugs to see if one of the cylinders wasn’t firing. The plugs were oily and black, one worse than the other. I cleaned them as best I could and put them back into the engine but swapped the cylinders they were in.
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When we tried to start the engine it made a strange sound. I noticed the idle needle valve was gone, just its spring was there. We began searching for the valve, it was very small, maybe a half inch long, and not magnetic, brass, we couldn’t use a magnet to sweep the ground. The ground was grass, the lawn, and I crept around looking but didn’t find it. Perhaps it had fallen into the big garbage can of water. We also looked around on the engine itself, it may have landed there. We drained out the big garbage can, no idle needle valve. I was resigned to buying the valve or a carb rebuild kit that included the valve.
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It ended up the valve had fallen into a little hole at the bottom of the engine and I saw the tiny tip of the needle valve, just lucky to see it. It was retrieved with needle nosed pliers and reinstalled. This time I didn’t fool around with the setting. The engine ran well. Our next step is to replace some or all of the gas with fresh gas.
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The next day was pizza and the dough was made as usual and the oven was set up at Eve’s house. Neil showed up and CM showed him Crisfield while I made dough. Once again I only made dough, the ladies prepped the toppings and made the pies. CM’s mom joined us, the talk drifted around to the old days when Neil had introduced me to Cornelia Marie and introduced her to Cap’n Chris who became her partner up until his tragic accident. Neil commented that he never got around to see old friends except when there was a memorial service for one of them.
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An old friend, Radio Bill, has departed St. Marys, GA, and is underway to Italy in his little Pearson Triton 28. He can be tracked at: https://cms.winlink.org:444/maps/PositionReports.aspx?callsign=N2ZLY&title=Position%20Reports%20for%20N2ZLY.
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The image is of Spartina grass which there is a lot of both here and St. Marys.

Burger Eve

10 June 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
Cap'n Chef Andy | Thunderstorms
After two days of stomach flu and feeling poorly I finally felt better and attended Red Shell Shanty’s Friday event with pulled pork and slaw as the daily special. I had a few Orange Crushes, after all, vitamin C helps with these viruses. The next day I felt ill again and spent most of the day onboard and not doing much of anything.
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Emergency pressure relief plug for the pressure cooker arrived and I find out that I need a 12 mm drill bit to drill a hole for it. Also a pair of crocheted crabs came in from my daughter who makes things like this, as well as a crocheted Yellow Submarine, how about that. It is, she says, an early Father’s Day gift.
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The next day I felt ill again. My temperature was normal. This was a continuation of the stomach flu I had during the week. The next day, Sunday, I went out on the bicycle to get drinking water, which I was out of, and a few ingredients to make bean soup. I felt achy from the ride and dehydrated. I rehydrated at the Red Shell Shanty bistro, Orange Crushes and crab dip with nachos. They had a big screen TV with the PGA Memorial tournament on and it was a nice match to see, tied up right to the end, and then a playoff hole with a missed putt deciding the match.
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The most interesting thing about the golf was that Jon Rahm who had a commanding lead, a record, was disqualified from the tournament due to a positive covid test. He was asymptomatic and playing brilliantly at a high level. He was only tested because he came in contact with someone who had covid, contact tracing protocol. How many of us are asymptomatic but not tested?
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I have an idea that if you are fully vaccinated and get exposed to the virus, you probably will have a reaction while your body fights it off with its new antibodies. This stomach flu might be in fact a covid variant that I’m fighting off.
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While sitting out these few days ill I followed some sailing news. The Volvo Ocean Race is now the Ocean Race and they are running from France to Portugal and then through the Straits back to Alicante, FR, in the Med. There is a Polish boat skippered by a Dutchman and they have been doing well. Meanwhile, Jack van Ommen has canceled his transatlantic voyage due to difficulties getting yacht insurance and the hurricane season brewing up early this season. He says he will still go sailing but just to the Northeast.
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It looks like the sail season here in Crisfield is slowly developing. On a bike ride this morning, feeling a bit better, I stopped at the City Dock with a fresh breeze from the West. I could see a sail out on the Bay. The Smith and Tangier Island tourist boats were leaving and I decided to stay to see if the sailboat was coming into Crisfield. It did and it took a while. As it got closer I could see a bowsprit and “a bone in her teeth”, the boat was creating a bow wave, moving well. It came in past the City Dock and sailed right into the marina. It is a classic ketch from L dock, maybe it’s a skipjack. The old fellow at the helm just stood there ramrod straight guiding his boat into the narrow entrance. I cycled around to watch him anchor and dowse sails. I met a couple on a Gemini catamaran on my dock and they said they hoped he would sail right into his slip. He probably could have done it if the wind was more to the South.
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I had made some bean soup using the pressure cooker and ended up with a big mess. The beans seemed to make a mush that jammed the pressure valve and the safety valve, both which excreted bean stuff onto the upper surface of the pressure cooker lid The heat made it all harden. I noticed the pressure valve, that some call the jiggler, stopped jiggling. Then the safety valve started to spew bean stuff and then nothing. It sat there on the heat getting hotter and hotter. I was playing sudoku on the computer and smelled a funny smell. Could beans make a funny smell? I got closer to the pressure cooker. There was a sound of steam trying to escape. I hit the jiggler to see what could happen. It started jiggling like an alarm guy swinging his lantern to warn the villagers. Even that stopped after a while. The pressure must have built again. After 40 minutes I turned off the burner and let the pressure cooker get back to normal. It took a long time. After it subsided I removed the lid. The inside showed bean stuff cemented on the lid and sides of the cooker. The directions said to add the diced onions, tomatoes, and smoked sausage, and simmer for 30 minutes. I did so. The result was a good soup. The mess was extensive.
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I woke up the next day feeling better but needing water, dehydrated. The soup had already been packed away in tupperware into the small fridge. The sink was full of stuff with bean stuff stuck on it. The work cleaning up all the bean stuff continued with some breaks in between sessions of soaking bean stuff with soapy water, then trying to clean. It took a while.
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Every time I tried to do anything I felt fatigued and backed off, yet I got some things done. I was called about going out the the American Legion, of whom I am now a member. It’s one of the best dining places in town. They captured the best chef in town when the pandemic hit and the other restaurants closed. It was Eve asking if I wanted to go there. I needed to shower. She picked me up and we went to the Legion. Orange Crush. Tuesday tacos. A couple joined us. A thunderstorm was brewing up on the horizon. More Orange Crushes. It was growing dark by the time I got back to the boat. I was feeling great.
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The next morning I did not feel great. I was almost out of water again. Eve called and said she had donated food and not enough room for it all, so I biked to her house and saw the immense pile of food. A huge box of frozen bagels, loaves of baguettes, a case of 24 cans of mixed vegetables, and lots of other stuff. I couldn’t take any of it with me on the bike, but I went to the supermarket and left with a small case of water. On the way back to the marina I felt like I had overdone it. Well I did the night before.
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Eve called and said burgers at her house at 6. I could see thunderstorms brewing on the horizon. I poured a liter of wine into a water bottle and left on the bicycle. At Eve’s house Cornelia Marie’s mom had already arrived. Eve was preparing burgers and salad in the kitchen. Someone called and was invited to burgers. It was Dee who arrived with a big dog, male, who started to play with Eve’s dog, young female. Most of the food was prepared from donated goods from a local church. The thunderstorms hit with heavy rain. The burgers were on the grill, covered, with smoke and steam swirling around. We braved the rain to get the burgers inside along with a nice salad. I ended up riding the bike in the rain back to the marina. CM’s mom was chauffeured to her townhouse.
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The image is a heavily manipulated photo of a local place that the dogs like to run around in.

GIMP Vomit

03 June 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
Cap'n Chef Andy
I was puttering around, raised the genoa again with the new halyard to see if it wrapped like the old one, it did. I also noted how high on the mast I had to mount the halyard restrainer. Maybe 6 inches from the halyard sheave. A cheap Chinese GPS speedometer arrived and I installed it in a blank spot on the end of the cabin outside just below the depth sounder display. Probably had a knotmeter in that spot at one time.
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I continued reading the sailpanache.com blog. At this point Panache is heading West from Costa Rica to Isla Cocos, then leaving there to Galapagos, then leaving there to the Marquesas, I think. His boat is older than Sunsplash but was converted to diesel and probably has a lot of other modifications to go offshore. At the same time I’m watching a 1984 Catalina 30 finish its auction at BoatAngel.org. Up to $3,800 with 10 minutes to go. 3 cyl. Diesel engine that is described as running with just over 500 hours on it. It sold at $4,050, $800 less than what Sunsplash went for last year.
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I was surprised to see Jack von Ommen back at it. Gosh, how old is he? Anyway, he sailed from Cape Charles a little South of Crisfield, to Deltaville, VA, on the Western Shore of the Chesapeake to haul out. Then he sailed back to Cape Charles and is ready to sail the Atlantic, great circle style, up past Nova Scotia, to North of Ireland, then Scotland.
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The next day I didn’t feel well and remembered Cornelia Marie had been ill with a virus during the previous week. I worked on my file of photos from the Canon camera and deleted some test shots that had been on the camera’s memory card from day one, 3 cameras ago. I have only had 3 photos printed for friends and family and plan to do more. I contacted Finer Arts, a printer in San Antonio who had printed a couple of test prints for me, and asked them what was the difference between the two canvases I had selected, they both looked identical to me. The reply was that they are noticeably different, Matte Canvas has a warm skin tone color and Artisan Archival Canvas is bright white. They will do an additional test print on Matte Canvas for me.
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I also did some manipulation of some of the photos, not permanent, just to see the various functions in Ubuntu’s GIMP application. I primarily used posterization, boosted contrast, and boosted saturation. I sent one image to Cornelia Marie who asked if I had vomited, and that image is the one I’m using on this blog post.

Memorable Memorial Day

01 June 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
Cap'n Chef Andy | Chilly
Although the new release of Navigatrix 64bit installs properly (navigatrix.net), I was unable to get the cheap Realtek based wifi adapter to work. The internal wifi works. The marina’s wifi is weak and needs the external USB antenna for a connection. When I was in the boatyard I needed the USB antenna on a long USB extension to access wifi.
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We had wind and rain, so my activities were confined to below decks. When it cleared up a bit I tried out the Minwax tung oil finish on the inside surfaces of the hatch drop boards. First I cleaned with Awesome cleaner from the dollar store, a small scrub brush, and a scotch brite sponge. This was supposed to be an easy simple task just to fill the time. It turned out to be messy and I’m sure my shoulder will be sore from scrubbing. A ton of old tung oil finish, dirt, and oxidation came off the surfaces. Catalina used a proprietary oil finish that was one of Frank Butler’s products, I think it was called Watco Teak Oil. Today’s product is not the same formulation as it was back in 1978.
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Cleaning the teak surface and allowing it to dry lightens it. Applying the Minwax product darkens the teak. In the end it looks about the same as it did before all the work. The wood looks like I’ve just cleaned it a little.
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During the high winds and rain a sailboat must have come into a nearby slip, it is about 30 feet away and I have been looking at it and trying to identify it. It is a double ender with an outboard rudder. I think it is a Thomas Gillmer design, about 32 feet LOA. He has several designs in that range and I tried to compare the cabin windows with the images on sailboatdata.com, also searching Google images, but no exact match. It looks like a handy boat, bluewater, stout windlass, self-steering wind vane, nice dodger, and a radar reflector on the mast. The color scheme of the sail cover and other canvas is green, just like Sunsplash. Oddly, there is no name or hailing port on the stern.
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OK, last night the owner of the aforementioned sailboat arrived on the dock and I dropped what I was doing to ask him about the boat. He is a very salty looking sailor dude and he says he is from Crisfield, sailed the boat up from the Carolinas. The strange thing is he was in the Red Shell Shanty while we were there and the ladies commented on him. Now we know, the boat is a Southern Cross 31 and the sailor has 5 kids. No mysteries in Crisfield, or in the marina, or on a boat.
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It was too windy today to go up the mast. Now there is a severe thunderstorm watch. Maybe tomorrow. After that it’s rain till next week.
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Now a few hours later, no severe thunderstorms, yet.
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There is a local newspaper, the County Times, or maybe The Somerset County Times. I browsed it online. I want to be up on the local activities, which there are a few. Memorial Day weekend is a kickoff for the season, and this is a tourist town. The main attraction is there are no main attractions, just peaceful waterfront, birds, fish, crabs, watermen plying their trade, I can ride my bike through an intersection without fear, now. There is no activity. A great town to bike around, except for the wind, keep it in mind, bear off and plan on a downwind ride. The wind keeps the big wind turbine spinning and generating power, I guess for the water department. It is a landmark.
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There is a soft crab festival coming this weekend. The late Spring and Summer seasons are when the crabs molt, and thus you get crabs who have lost their shells and are soft crabs. In the wild they hide in the reeds that line the shores here. The crabmen catch them and put them in tanks where they shed their shells, then they are captured again, and end up getting fried, mostly, in a sandwich, or as Eve did, as a delicious appetizer.
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There are mentions in the newspaper of various restaurants and crab shacks opening for the season, but no mention of the Red Shell Shanty. It has been busy there lately, and they have added Sunday till 6, so they are open 3 days a week.
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When I was constructing Kaimu the catamaran in Norwalk Cove in Connecticut I noticed expensive cars driven by young people through the boatyard to the West. One day I changed out of my boatyard clothes and dressed sensibly and went West to see what it was they were going to. There it was, The Sunset Grill, overlooking Norwalk harbor to the West and getting a great sunset view. The clientele consisted of locals from East Norwalk, Westport, and maybe some from Stamford, moneyed and wearing boater gear, woven leather belts with Buck knives in sheathes. Docksiders. They just wanted to blend in with the boatyard and be in a place off the beaten path, which is hard to find on the Connecticut shore.
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Now I am in a similar place, but not on the Connecticut Shore, this is on the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake. A view to the West of the sunset. No financial advisers with Buck knives, just locals who know the place, busy and fun. Red Shell Shanty, aka The Pink Pussycat. I will help keep them in business.
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We had a lull in the wind and rain, a really beautiful day, and I had planned to go up the mast on such a day, but I chickened out and began working on a less daunting project, fixing loose cleats at the stern.
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I couldn’t see the ends of the cleat bolts inside the quarter berth, so I cleared out the berth, a big job, everything was stowed in there, then cleaned the surface so I could crawl in there and get to work. Still couldn’t see the ends of the bolts, measured up on deck, 80 inches from the rear of the cabin, then measured inside, 80 inches is past the end of the quarter berth. There was a panel there, difficult to work in such a tight space, remove screws, panel wouldn’t budge, pry, applying utmost pressure and the panel popped off and fell like a guillotine blade. Fortunately I was clear of it. What a way to go. Behind the panel was the lazarette locker. I could have gotten into that space simply by opening the lazarette hatch.
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The two cleats on the quarter berth side of the stern were both loose. One had been improperly installed without backing washers or backing plate inside. The bolts had pulled into the liner and looked somewhat corroded. Hard to reach them. I removed the other cleat which had lost one of it’s nuts. There was no lock washer on the remaining bolt. I hunted around for lock washers and a nut and backing washer. I reinstalled the cleat properly. To do this I had to fit myself into the lazarette. It is a tiny space and I am not very flexible. I felt like the lady who’s fallen and can’t get up, I had trouble getting in and out of the lazarette. I found other loose nuts and tightened them. I was feeling exhausted and then realized I hadn’t had any lunch and only a very light breakfast early in the morning.
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I decided to have a snack of pickled herring. The jar was not completely full and I finished it off and sat on the settee. The cabin was now packed with all the stuff that came out of the quarter berth. I was bushed. Rain is in the forecast and there was stuff out in the cockpit that had to come in. I didn’t feel like doing anything more. The phone rang and it was Eve asking if I wanted to come over and have steak with her and CM’s mom. I declined. I washed up and cleared the settee enough for sleep. Early to bed.
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I woke at a quarter to four. I was starving. I made breakfast before sun up. The sky brightened revealing clouds overcast and bringing rain. I had better finish up my work on deck and in the lazarette and stow things below again. To remove the remaining loose cleat I had to put vise grips on each nut and unscrew the bolt. Thus I was crawling in and out of the lazarette 4 times plus one for when the vise grips fell off. I then went off and showered and took one of the bolts to the hardware store on the bike. I purchased 4 fender washers and a potable water garden hose. The marina had removed my hose from the water spigot on the dock and then had it draped over the finger pier with both ends in the water. Of course the hose was fouled and no longer usable.
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I stopped at Food Lion for water, I was out. I was feeling very warm when I returned to the boat and started drinking water. After a while I felt much better and began the process of reinstalling the cleat. Down in the lazarette, put fender washer, lock washer, and nut on bolt, up on deck, begin screwing bolt. The first bolt had galled, I think the lock washer gouged into the bolt threads. I saved that bolt for last and continued. I was able to ungall the bolt by running a nut up and down the bolt with the Makita drill and a bit that fit the bolt. Finally I was finished. It is just short of 11 AM, some days I’m still in the sack at that time.
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Later we gathered at the Red Shell Shanty again for appetizers and Orange Crushes. We had Memorial Day weekend coming as well as a nasty cold front. The next day was chilly, rainy, and very windy. I puttered around trying to get the Fagor pressure cooker to seal with the new lid seal. It was obvious that it wouldn’t fit, but it was soft rubbery plastic, so I could trim it. After several sessions with it, including running the cooker dry, using up a propane cylinder, and running the risk of a small galley fire, I was saved by a phone call, flounder dinner at CM’s mom’s house.
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I continued on the pressure cooker sealing ring the next day and found by trimming the flanges off the ring it would fit the groove in the Fagor lid. This is probably the Classic 6 qt. model. I pressured up the cooker, now with a Presto canner jiggler valve. This valve is in 3 parts so that it can be set for 5, 10, or 15 psi. 15 psi is about 1 bar and is what most USA pressure cookers run at. However, the Fagor blew its safety valve well before the jiggler started jiggling. I did some research and found Fagor operates at .55 bar, or just under 10 psi. I removed one of the weight rings from the jiggler and ran it up to 10 psi with no problems. I also ordered Presto part number 09915, pressure safety release plug, which I will install to run the cooker at 1 bar, 15 psi. Cooking time at 1 bar vs .55 bar is 13 minutes vs 20 minutes, also canning meat products requires the higher pressure. I’m sure the Fagor is strong enough for the higher pressure.
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Memorial Day itself was cool and clear. A barbecue cookout was on the schedule and I was asked to pick up some corn at the grocers. Others arrived with potato salad, slaw, beans and bacon, Smith Island cake, and Eve, who was hosting, baked ribs and jalapeno poppers, which were the best I ever tasted. There was also wine, a lot of it, and good conversation into the evening.
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The image is a shot at the beach at Jaynes Island on the Chesapeake Bay side.
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This post is long because the internet has been down in the marina for almost a week, thus a double long post.

Crisfield Preseason

25 May 2021 | Somers Cove, Crisfield, MD
Cap'n Chef Andy | Seasonable
Pizza Night. Not to be. We were at the Red Shell Shanty on Friday for their seasonal opening. Saturday was supposed to be Quesadillas at CM’s mom’s house, but the chef was too tired and we went to Fisherman’s Grille, formerly Cap’n Tylers. The next night was the Quesadillas and tequila drinks. Then came the FEAST at Eve’s house. What a meal. Appetizer of soft shell crab sauteed in butter, an old family recipe. Eve grew up on the Chesapeake and knows crabs. The main course was crab imperial with veggies on the side. Better than any restaurant anywhere.
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So the pizza oven was quiet over the weekend. For some reason I kept thinking it was Memorial Day because Cornelia Marie had taken Monday off. She had some real estate transaction that left her with no mortgage, but depleted her accounts. We had had a great weekend with mostly good food and beautiful weather, riding around on the borrowed skiff, picnic on a remote beach on Jaynes Island State Park. The dock which could probably hold 100 boats had just us. The beach was empty until a catamaran landed about a half mile away.
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Crisfield was still an empty town just like last summer, but it’s early in the season and I expect after Memorial Day things will pick up. In the meantime I continued working on the genoa roller furler problem. The halyard was in really bad shape, so I had ordered a replacement, which came in very quickly from Defender Marine. The new halyard arrived without a thimble in the eye, so I ordered a thimble, two mast steps to install near the mast head, and a halyard restrainer, which will change the lead angle of the halyard to the upper swivel of the furler. The old halyard had to be removed forward with a tag line attached to the tail of the halyard, then the tail of the new halyard was attached to the tag line and pulled up and over. For the remainder of the work at the masthead I will be up there with the electric bos’un’s chair which I brought along with its battery.
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I somehow turned off the speaker output on my laptop, but the headphone jack still works. A pair of headphones came in, cheap, called TM-02, I think, rechargeable, bluetoothable to the cell phone, and will take a 3.5mm audio plug, so a male-male cable also came in. Surprisingly this cheap headphone also has a decent FM radio built in, and I was able to tune to WBYC, the local low power radio station with its eclectic playlist. “Crissfield, a great place to be”, is the mantra coming from WBYC at regular intervals. This external headphone also keeps my hat on my head when I’m riding the bike down to the City Dock.
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Cornelia Marie reported that she had a cold and a temperature while working in Baltimore. Would she come down from Baltimore, driving 3 hours while ill? She did so, but needed time to decompress from the drive. We went to the Red Shell Shanty for crab meat, crab dip, and Orange Crush, a drink that has a lot of vitamin C in it, so it is healthy. I couldn’t do anything the next day until around noon. She was feeling better and began doing some art. I did a load of laundry and then shopped for groceries. There was an art event downtown near the City Dock. The street was closed. Vendors set up booths with art and crafts. A couple of food booths. Eve, the artist, had a booth and sold enough to credit herself with $5/hour for the day. It was a nice day, but the bugs were out. It was promising to see Crisfield awaken a bit after hibernation from the pandemic and winter, off season.
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I was starving and ready to go inside somewhere to get away from the no-see-ums and biting flies and order a burger and a beer. The art event didn’t close up till 7, so I moseyed off to the Red Shell Shanty and had an Orange Crush. I nursed it. The ladies had to take care of their dogs, pack up unsold artwork, and finally showed up at the Shanty. CM’s mom arrived with wonder dog Nori. Eve and a shop owner and entrepreneur from the art event arrived. Orange Crush and Chardonnay. Crab Quesadillas, the night’s special. Here I was, captive by the females. Even Nori is female. We almost closed the place, by a half hour. Another one bites the dust.
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The laptop from the boatyard didn’t arrive on Friday, the predicted delivery date, and now Saturday was done and no laptop.
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Sunday was announced as Pizza Night day, so we had to work together to make the dough, then shop for supplies, and make pizza, and art, at Eve’s house. The yeast seemed very lively and the first mix of dough raised up good and high. When I mixed in the last cup of flour the dough seemed wet and sticky. I added another half cup of flour and kneeded the dough by hand. It was what I called strong dough that handled reasonably.
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CM’s mom and I made the first pie. She wanted a Margarita pie with just tomato, cheese, and fresh basil. I used some of Eve’s canned tomatoes, some tomato puree, very thin slices of mozzarella, dusted with “Italian Mix” spices and baked for about 10 minutes. The fresh basil, preshredded, went on after the pie came out of the oven. Simple and very delicate taste. The dough was crispy and crunchy.
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Next CM made a pie and that came out with lots of ingredients. She used everything, I think. It was great.
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There was a lull and I made another pie with a lot of pepperoni on it. It was good. Eve retaliated with a pie that had a ton of stuff on it, she emptied the toppings from the cutting board. It baked a full ten minutes and maybe just a bit more. It looked great. We ended up with lots of leftovers, but out of wine and margaritas. The next day I had to put away all the pizza stuff. It is a chore, but the social get together is worth it.
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The new laptop came in and the Navigatrix 64 bit operating system installed smoothly. This laptop will be a backup to the one I am now using.
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The image is of the remote dock at Jaynes Island State Park, room for many boats but empty.
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