Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
14 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
09 January 2024 | St Marys, GA
23 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
10 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
25 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
03 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
26 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
17 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
11 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
04 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
20 September 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
Recent Blog Posts
23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Inside Seams

Day two of the dinghy build started out with me finishing wiring the hull bottoms together on the centerline of the bottom panels. This was much easier than the wiring of the chine edges of the bottom panels and the side panels.

15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Dinghy Day One

A Wharram Pahi 26 had been anchored in the river nearby the boatyard and was hauled out with the travel lift. I went around to look at it and talked to the owner couple. I was surprised that it had been built in Martinique in 1988. The boat is more than 30 years old.

11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Redux

The inflatable (deflatable) dinghy I had bought was deteriorating. It had bottom seams separating. It is a West Marine branded dinghy made out of PVC. HH66 is the adhesive to reattach the seams. A friend had a similar problem and bought the same adhesive. I was waiting to hear from him how it worked [...]

06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

The Clincher

We decided to go to Amelia Island for the day, probably to the beach. Our plan to cycle around on the Raleigh 20’s seemed like a bad idea, Bleu can’t keep up with a bicycle for very long and when he quits he quits. So we would walk, where?, Fort Clinch State Park. She has a forever pass for Florida [...]

26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA

Zen and Bike Maintenance

Eloisa rolled into the boatyard after a long drive down from the mountains. It was getting cold and isolated up there. I had a nasty toothache and we went to Southern River Walk. Bleu, her black American cocker was showing a bit of plumpness. I had had a sandwich and some wine already, so I didn’t [...]

14 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA

Sink the Bismarck

I continued reading Richard J Evans - The Coming of the Third Reich. It is chilling to read how a cultured, disciplined country can descend into a horrible Armageddon, not once, but twice, and bring the whole world into wars of might and ignorance. I don't know politics, but this book is a revelation. [...]

Cabinet Doors

09 February 2012 | Bodkin Inlet
Capn Andy/cold
The picture is of 3 cabinet door frames that were incompletely cured due to the cold weather, set above the catalytic heater to fully cure the epoxy glue. The lap joints at the corners are visible. These frames will be sanded and shaped for the glass windows in their centers. What follows is the carpentry to make them.

The planks of golden teak for the cabinet doors were run through a circular saw to remove the tongue and groove edges, then ripped down the middle to produce planks that are roughly 1 1/2" X 3/4". I began cutting the pieces to make the cabinet door above the microwave. I found the router bits I was using to make lap joints for the corners were burning the wood and splintering it. I noticed the wood would burn easily with the saw and belt sander also. I continued making the cabinet doors above the stove counter. All of these doors are horizontal opening downward. For the stove counter doors I used a bandsaw to carefully cut the lap joints. They came out much better than using the router.

The next day I tried a technique to make the cuts on the bandsaw even more accurate. My problem was I couldn't see the blade strike the wood due to shadows and the difficulty of making a discernable mark on the wood itself. The wood, being teak, was oily and dark. Pencil marks, ink, scratching with a sharp point, all left marks that didn't show up well enough to start a cut accurately. This time I made the first cut with the remarkable multitool with a crescent blade. That first cut was a sure guide for the bandsaw. The cuts were perfectly accurate, closer than 1/16 th an inch, close as the width of a pencil line. Also the cutting process was much quicker. I made two frames and glued them, using their cabinets to line them up with clamps and plastic to prevent them being glued in place.

The next day was cold and the epoxy hadn't fully cured, so the catalytic heater was fired up to warm the space and the stock for the remaining cabinet frames was ripped. Also stock for the original frame that came out so badly was ripped. The last two frames were for the cabinet to the right of the stovetop, a pair of doors. The bad cabinet frame over the microwave was redesigned a bit to be a full insert.

The three frames were cut, the lap joints were cut, sanded to fit, and dry clamped into their cabinets. Then the glue was mixed and the frames were clamped and forced into correct alignment within their cabinets. After they cure, they all have to be shaped with a belt sander, routed for the glass windows, and routed for the softened edges.

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