Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
14 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
09 January 2024 | St Marys, GA
23 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
10 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
25 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
03 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
26 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
17 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
11 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
04 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
20 September 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
Recent Blog Posts
23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Inside Seams

Day two of the dinghy build started out with me finishing wiring the hull bottoms together on the centerline of the bottom panels. This was much easier than the wiring of the chine edges of the bottom panels and the side panels.

15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Dinghy Day One

A Wharram Pahi 26 had been anchored in the river nearby the boatyard and was hauled out with the travel lift. I went around to look at it and talked to the owner couple. I was surprised that it had been built in Martinique in 1988. The boat is more than 30 years old.

11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Redux

The inflatable (deflatable) dinghy I had bought was deteriorating. It had bottom seams separating. It is a West Marine branded dinghy made out of PVC. HH66 is the adhesive to reattach the seams. A friend had a similar problem and bought the same adhesive. I was waiting to hear from him how it worked [...]

06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

The Clincher

We decided to go to Amelia Island for the day, probably to the beach. Our plan to cycle around on the Raleigh 20’s seemed like a bad idea, Bleu can’t keep up with a bicycle for very long and when he quits he quits. So we would walk, where?, Fort Clinch State Park. She has a forever pass for Florida [...]

26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA

Zen and Bike Maintenance

Eloisa rolled into the boatyard after a long drive down from the mountains. It was getting cold and isolated up there. I had a nasty toothache and we went to Southern River Walk. Bleu, her black American cocker was showing a bit of plumpness. I had had a sandwich and some wine already, so I didn’t [...]

14 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA

Sink the Bismarck

I continued reading Richard J Evans - The Coming of the Third Reich. It is chilling to read how a cultured, disciplined country can descend into a horrible Armageddon, not once, but twice, and bring the whole world into wars of might and ignorance. I don't know politics, but this book is a revelation. [...]

A Post About the Stern

12 June 2013 | Bodkin Inlet/Chesapeake Bay
Capn Andy/hot and humid
I finally began the work on Kaimu that had been avoided for the last 6 months.
.
The sternpost problem was the first item on the list. The soft wood that already had been removed left big divots. The starboard post lost its inner face down to deck level and about 1 ½ inches below. The port sternpost had some general removal of some of the inner face, but it was mostly intact, plus the damage didn't extend to deck level or below.
.
The soft wood was removed with die grinder with wood rasp bits. The bits were designed to be used in a drill. It happened that their shaft diameter would fit the die grinder. It was like dental work. Other tools included chisel, drill, multitool with narrow straight blade.
.
The surfaces were hit with angle grinder with a flap disc to remove remnants of staples, blobs of epoxy, and any uneven spots in the surface. Then the surfaces were primed with straight epoxy and allowed to soak in. Next a putty of epoxy and wood flour was smooshed into the cavities of the sternposts. The area that was eroded below the deck was brought up even with the deck. Larger areas that might sag were covered with a piece of stiff plastic (from an old caution sign). The plastic was held in place with a bungee cord and a piece of wood.
.
5/4 thick wood matched perfectly the thickness of the inner face that had been removed from the starboard sternpost. I wanted to use pressure treated wood to eliminate the possibility of rot. Some research showed that pressure treated wood is readily available, as it is used for house decks, a common home improvement project. The grades of lumber for residential use are mostly not acceptable for marine use. Workboat and dock repair can use these common grades, but the detailed building instructions in Wharram's plans discuss acceptable grades of wood and also how to grade any available wood. The best grade of pressure treated wood is Premium and it is used for deck planks which are usually 5/4” thickness. A trip to a quality lumber yard resulted in a piece of deck planking with no knots and the KDAT rating. KDAT means kiln dried after treatment. Normally pressure treated lumber is saturated with the treatment solution, which is usually water based, and as it slowly dries out, it warps and checks. KDAT lumber will be more dimensionally stable. I was happy with my piece of wood. It was shaped to fit the void left by the soft plank that had been removed. Stainless 18 gauge brads, 1 ½ inches, were used with the air nailer to put it all back together.
.
Epoxy with colloidal silica additive was used as glue. The glue fairs well, but it is very hard and doesn't sand easily. I used a right angle grinder with a flap disc to lightly sand off any high spots, then used an orbital sander with 120 wet dry paper to smooth the surface and provide keying for paint. Two coats of arctic white finished the job.
.
The picture is of the starboard sternpost with new wood glued in place, prior to finishing.
Comments

About & Links

SailBlogs Groups