Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
14 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
09 January 2024 | St Marys, GA
23 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
10 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
25 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
03 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
26 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
17 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
11 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
04 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
20 September 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
Recent Blog Posts
23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Inside Seams

Day two of the dinghy build started out with me finishing wiring the hull bottoms together on the centerline of the bottom panels. This was much easier than the wiring of the chine edges of the bottom panels and the side panels.

15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Dinghy Day One

A Wharram Pahi 26 had been anchored in the river nearby the boatyard and was hauled out with the travel lift. I went around to look at it and talked to the owner couple. I was surprised that it had been built in Martinique in 1988. The boat is more than 30 years old.

11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Redux

The inflatable (deflatable) dinghy I had bought was deteriorating. It had bottom seams separating. It is a West Marine branded dinghy made out of PVC. HH66 is the adhesive to reattach the seams. A friend had a similar problem and bought the same adhesive. I was waiting to hear from him how it worked [...]

06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

The Clincher

We decided to go to Amelia Island for the day, probably to the beach. Our plan to cycle around on the Raleigh 20’s seemed like a bad idea, Bleu can’t keep up with a bicycle for very long and when he quits he quits. So we would walk, where?, Fort Clinch State Park. She has a forever pass for Florida [...]

26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA

Zen and Bike Maintenance

Eloisa rolled into the boatyard after a long drive down from the mountains. It was getting cold and isolated up there. I had a nasty toothache and we went to Southern River Walk. Bleu, her black American cocker was showing a bit of plumpness. I had had a sandwich and some wine already, so I didn’t [...]

14 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA

Sink the Bismarck

I continued reading Richard J Evans - The Coming of the Third Reich. It is chilling to read how a cultured, disciplined country can descend into a horrible Armageddon, not once, but twice, and bring the whole world into wars of might and ignorance. I don't know politics, but this book is a revelation. [...]

#4 Beam Pt. III

27 June 2013 | Bodkin Inlet/Chesapeake Bay
Capn Andy/hot humid
The temporary support for the aft cross deck and engine box was a 2 ½ “ diameter schedule 40 pipe that ran across under the cross deck framing and under the engine box. At either end a 1/2” rope was tied on with a rolling hitch and the rope was tensioned above the cross deck on the running back stay winches. This temporary support was immediately in front of the crossbeam that was to be replaced.
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The crossdeck support frame is a lattice of aluminum channel welded together, powder coated, and bolted to the crossbeams. Plywood deck panels are bolted to the support frame. To remove the #4 crossbeam, the crossdeck frame had to be unbolted from the beam. It is now supported by the temporary heavy gauge pipe. The bolts were well bedded into the beam and crossdeck frame, and took quite an effort to remove. These were large bolts and a 3 foot pipe extension was necessary on the socket wrench. Once the bolts could move, they were run out with an electric drill with a socket adapter.
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After the bolts were removed, the only thing holding the crossdeck and engine box in place was residual paint and epoxy. These started to release once the bolts were out of there, and there was a creaking, crunching sound. This was not like cutting a limb off a tree while sitting on the limb, but it had that element of asking “what if?”. If the temporary support gave way, we would be dumped into the Bodkin, engine and all. The support did hold, and the crossdeck and engine box settled to a level about 1 ½ inches lower.
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Now the beam could be lifted out of its troughs. The porta power has an attachment that can wedge into a narrow space, then expand when pumped up. It was placed under the beam at the gunwale and lifted the beam a few inches at a time.
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The picture is of the old beam being lifted above the cross deck. The cracks are the result of moisture infiltrating the beam, causing it to swell, and cracking the glass/epoxy coating. This beam will be flipped on its side to serve as an 18 ½ foot work table on which the new beam will be laminated.
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