Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
14 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
09 January 2024 | St Marys, GA
23 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
10 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
25 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
03 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
26 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
17 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
11 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
04 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
20 September 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
Recent Blog Posts
23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Inside Seams

Day two of the dinghy build started out with me finishing wiring the hull bottoms together on the centerline of the bottom panels. This was much easier than the wiring of the chine edges of the bottom panels and the side panels.

15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Dinghy Day One

A Wharram Pahi 26 had been anchored in the river nearby the boatyard and was hauled out with the travel lift. I went around to look at it and talked to the owner couple. I was surprised that it had been built in Martinique in 1988. The boat is more than 30 years old.

11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Redux

The inflatable (deflatable) dinghy I had bought was deteriorating. It had bottom seams separating. It is a West Marine branded dinghy made out of PVC. HH66 is the adhesive to reattach the seams. A friend had a similar problem and bought the same adhesive. I was waiting to hear from him how it worked [...]

06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

The Clincher

We decided to go to Amelia Island for the day, probably to the beach. Our plan to cycle around on the Raleigh 20’s seemed like a bad idea, Bleu can’t keep up with a bicycle for very long and when he quits he quits. So we would walk, where?, Fort Clinch State Park. She has a forever pass for Florida [...]

26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA

Zen and Bike Maintenance

Eloisa rolled into the boatyard after a long drive down from the mountains. It was getting cold and isolated up there. I had a nasty toothache and we went to Southern River Walk. Bleu, her black American cocker was showing a bit of plumpness. I had had a sandwich and some wine already, so I didn’t [...]

14 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA

Sink the Bismarck

I continued reading Richard J Evans - The Coming of the Third Reich. It is chilling to read how a cultured, disciplined country can descend into a horrible Armageddon, not once, but twice, and bring the whole world into wars of might and ignorance. I don't know politics, but this book is a revelation. [...]

#4 Beam Pt VII

08 August 2013 | Bodkin Inlet/Chesapeake Bay
Capn Andy/thunderstorms
With the new lumber stacked to dry out and wrapped in plastic to act like a solar oven, I began finishing work on beam #4. The aft face of the beam was notched so that the width of the beam at each notch equaled the width of the existing beam brackets. The notches were in the aft face of the beam so that the front face would fit flush against the cross deck and engine box. The aft face doesn't attach to anything, so the excess width of the beam would all be on the aft face.
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The beam was faired with epoxy filled with colloidal silica to a consistency a little bit looser than vaseline. It could be painted on with a brush, yet still hold its shape. It would self level a little bit, smoothing out the rough brush strokes. I worked on two faces of the beam at a time.
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The epoxy was lightly sanded with 120 grit wet/dry paper and an orbital sander, then painted with two part acrylic urethane, color: arctic white. Painting always brings out the hidden flaws in the finish, so meticulous finishers will paint a dummy coat, sometimes two or more with contrasting pigments, to find out where additional finishing is required. On this beam a workboat finish was acceptable. Not much of the beam is visible, only the top to anyone on deck, and only the aft face to anyone approaching the swimming ladder. Of course everyone who dinghies over to visit will see the aft face of the beam, so a little extra care was taken with its fairing and finish.
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Another W A Robinson book arrived, To the Great Southern Sea, about his voyage in Varua from Tahiti to Chile to Galapagos and back to Tahiti. On the internet Grillabongquixotic wrote the last of his blog, this about helping his friends sail their boat from Hawaii to Canada. By chance I ran across a blog by Barry Spanier of windsurfing fame, recounting his years as a young man with no money, losing his cruising sailboat, and finally working as a sailmaker in Maui after arriving there with only $51 in his pocket. Bourne and Spanier became a very successful sail loft and invented many of the peculiar devices in windsurfing. That included the fully battened sail and the rotating air foil sail. He recounts his associations with most of the top sailors of that era and his business arrangement with Neil Pryde.
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The picture is of the beam with its first coat of paint on the aft face, which is facing up in the photo, right next to the old beam which continues to deteriorate.
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