Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
14 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
09 January 2024 | St Marys, GA
23 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
10 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
25 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
03 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
26 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
17 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
11 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
04 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
20 September 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
Recent Blog Posts
23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Inside Seams

Day two of the dinghy build started out with me finishing wiring the hull bottoms together on the centerline of the bottom panels. This was much easier than the wiring of the chine edges of the bottom panels and the side panels.

15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Dinghy Day One

A Wharram Pahi 26 had been anchored in the river nearby the boatyard and was hauled out with the travel lift. I went around to look at it and talked to the owner couple. I was surprised that it had been built in Martinique in 1988. The boat is more than 30 years old.

11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Redux

The inflatable (deflatable) dinghy I had bought was deteriorating. It had bottom seams separating. It is a West Marine branded dinghy made out of PVC. HH66 is the adhesive to reattach the seams. A friend had a similar problem and bought the same adhesive. I was waiting to hear from him how it worked [...]

06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

The Clincher

We decided to go to Amelia Island for the day, probably to the beach. Our plan to cycle around on the Raleigh 20’s seemed like a bad idea, Bleu can’t keep up with a bicycle for very long and when he quits he quits. So we would walk, where?, Fort Clinch State Park. She has a forever pass for Florida [...]

26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA

Zen and Bike Maintenance

Eloisa rolled into the boatyard after a long drive down from the mountains. It was getting cold and isolated up there. I had a nasty toothache and we went to Southern River Walk. Bleu, her black American cocker was showing a bit of plumpness. I had had a sandwich and some wine already, so I didn’t [...]

14 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA

Sink the Bismarck

I continued reading Richard J Evans - The Coming of the Third Reich. It is chilling to read how a cultured, disciplined country can descend into a horrible Armageddon, not once, but twice, and bring the whole world into wars of might and ignorance. I don't know politics, but this book is a revelation. [...]

#1 Beam Pt IV

07 September 2013 | Bodkin Inlet/Chesapeake Bay
Capn Andy/80, dry
We ran into one of the marine carpenters who works on Witchcraft, the 1906 ketch berthed locally. He said my lack of progress was due to not putting in full work days, and also that I needed “professional help”. He is referring to carpentry not psychiatry. He also implied that sailing a Hobie cat instead of working on the big boat would keep me from ever getting the job done so that I could sail the big boat. I asked him about his own boat project, which is a Pearson 30 monohull. It is not ready to sail, but he has been restoring it and may get it sailing soon.
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There are a slew of monohull sailboats available in the 30 foot range and some are free or at a very low price, although they usually need restoration before they can be of use. Back in the old days a 30 foot boat would be acceptable for extensive cruising. William Robinson's circumnavigation was with a 32 footer. Although some boats in this size range are more suited for day sailing, many have enough room and storage for longer voyages. Coastal cruising doesn't require large tanks of water and fuel or provisions for weeks and weeks. The best time to shop for a small cruising boat like this is in the off season when the seller is faced with winter storage and the boat, if it has been in use, will be in running order. Then it can be taken south for the winter by the new owner.
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On our docks there are a couple of boats like this, a Seafarer and a Hunter 27. I don't think either of these boats cost more than $2000 and they are both in the water in sail away condition. There is an organization named C.R.A.B., Chesapeake Regional Accessible Boating (I think), that sells donated boats at very reasonable prices. Most are smaller, but some are in this 30 foot range and capable of ocean sailing.
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I did sail a little monohull sloop for a while, but after sailing a catamaran I was no longer happy to be limited by a keel boat's hull speed. It was not possible to get a 34 foot sloop going any faster than around 6 ½ knots and in light winds it crawled along.
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After running out of colloidal silica, I went sailing on the Hobie and had a great time even though the wind was only about 8 knots. The colloidal silica is from Raka, Inc. and it is very reasonably priced. This last bunch was two 8 oz bags which look like over a gallon of powder each. I was surprised that I used it up. I reordered 3 lb which now costs about $40, three times more quantity than my last order for about twice the price. It is mixed with the resin in ratios of 1:1 (runny) on up to about 3:1 (like vaseline).
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It was time to do some non epoxy type of things while the order of silica was on its way. The air compressor was moved up to the boat shed. The builder's mess on deck could be cleaned up a bit. Kaptain Kris showed up and revealed he had some silica on hand and I could borrow some till my shipment came in.
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The voids in the beam's glue joints were few and far between, but they had to be filled completely. Also the edges of the planks had been rounded off in manufacture, so even with planing, there remained divots in the glue joints that had to be filled. The runny silica mix was used to penetrate any voids, then when that had cured, a filling of thicker consistency was used to fair the beam.
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The picture is of the beam during the fairing process. The beam weighs 266 lbs with additional 16 lbs of epoxy and filler. The old beam weighs more due to rot making it like a sponge soaking up rainwater. So, the four beams, as designed, weigh together a little more than half a ton.
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