Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
14 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
09 January 2024 | St Marys, GA
23 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
10 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
25 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
03 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
26 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
17 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
11 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
04 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
20 September 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
Recent Blog Posts
23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Inside Seams

Day two of the dinghy build started out with me finishing wiring the hull bottoms together on the centerline of the bottom panels. This was much easier than the wiring of the chine edges of the bottom panels and the side panels.

15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Dinghy Day One

A Wharram Pahi 26 had been anchored in the river nearby the boatyard and was hauled out with the travel lift. I went around to look at it and talked to the owner couple. I was surprised that it had been built in Martinique in 1988. The boat is more than 30 years old.

11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Redux

The inflatable (deflatable) dinghy I had bought was deteriorating. It had bottom seams separating. It is a West Marine branded dinghy made out of PVC. HH66 is the adhesive to reattach the seams. A friend had a similar problem and bought the same adhesive. I was waiting to hear from him how it worked [...]

06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

The Clincher

We decided to go to Amelia Island for the day, probably to the beach. Our plan to cycle around on the Raleigh 20’s seemed like a bad idea, Bleu can’t keep up with a bicycle for very long and when he quits he quits. So we would walk, where?, Fort Clinch State Park. She has a forever pass for Florida [...]

26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA

Zen and Bike Maintenance

Eloisa rolled into the boatyard after a long drive down from the mountains. It was getting cold and isolated up there. I had a nasty toothache and we went to Southern River Walk. Bleu, her black American cocker was showing a bit of plumpness. I had had a sandwich and some wine already, so I didn’t [...]

14 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA

Sink the Bismarck

I continued reading Richard J Evans - The Coming of the Third Reich. It is chilling to read how a cultured, disciplined country can descend into a horrible Armageddon, not once, but twice, and bring the whole world into wars of might and ignorance. I don't know politics, but this book is a revelation. [...]

Preparations

30 September 2013 | Bodkin Inlet/Chesapeake Bay
Capn Andy/perfect weather
The work to get the boat back into sailing condition continued. The rig had been loosened to take the pressure off the beam mounting bolts so that the bolts could be cinched up tight. The potential problem was that the two new beams might not match up with the two remaining beams, and the inward heel of the two hulls might be due to the old beams and not due to the downforce of the mast and rig. In fact, the new beams tightened up nicely once the rig was loose. Then the rig was tightened up again. This was done by tensioning the running backstays to the max, then restoring the shrouds and finally the inner forestay to proper tension.
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Kaimu has what is called a double triangle rig. This means that there are three main stays, forestay and two shrouds, and they are doubled so that there are two forestays, one for the genoa and one for the staysail, and two shrouds on each side, an upper and a lower shroud. Instead of turnbuckles to tension the rig, the stays are lashed to the chainplates with dynema of one ton breaking strength. The dynema is kind of like shoestring and is threaded around thimbles set into the chainplate and the eye in the end of the shroud. One end of the dynema is secured with a half hitch up onto the shroud. The rest is lead through the thimbles around and around until there are 8 standing parts. Dynema is a greasy rope making it easy to tighten the lashing just like a multipart block and tackle. When it is as tight as possible, the remaining line is half hitched around the standing parts. The half hitches are continued halfway up the standing parts, then the upper line that was secured to the shroud is brought down and half hitched down the standing parts. The multiple half hitches cover the standing parts and block ultraviolet. They also help prevent the dynema from unraveling the hitches. Dynema requires some changes to knot tying, in this case the half hitch is doubled, the line is brought around twice for each hitch. Wharram specifies dacron for his lashings and dacron will tie off using ordinary knots. There is quite a bit of discussion on the internet about tying knots with dyneema or spectra line. The lashings on Kaimu have lasted for 10 years with no evidence of unraveling. The breaking strength of the lashing is about 8 tons on each shroud.
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The forward part of the deck table had broken apart and it was cleaned up and reglued with 10% graphite epoxy thickened with colloidal silica. The original glue was given to me to try out and turned out to have poor structural strength. It is a prethickened epoxy that is despensed with a caulking cartridge gun that mixes the epoxy at the tip. The problems are that the mixing isn't complete enough, and the premixed epoxy will never mix completely enough. The recommended way to mix and thicken epoxy is to mix the epoxy resin and hardener first, then add the thickener and mix to proper consistency. The mixer caulking gun is certainly more convenient.
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The deck table is not required to get the boat sailing, but is more desirable work than scraping the mussels off the hull that have grown while in port. Other tasks are replacing the engine fuel filter, almost 40 dollars a pair including shipping, checking hydraulic fluid in the steering system, topping off batteries with distilled water, getting a jerry can of gasoline for the engine, and cleaning up the tool mess from the beam projects. In fact I made a big list and organized it. The top of the list ended up being scraping the hulls, ugh.
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The printer screwed up while printing the list, leaving out the scraping job. See, even the printer knows what to do with this nasty job. All the other jobs on the list looked OK, but scraping the hulls came out on its own printed sheet, there at the top was SCRAPE THE HULLS.
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When I last scraped the hulls it took 2 or 3 days. I tried to find my log entry about it, but perhaps I didn't write it up. Classic Wharram catamarans have a vee shaped hull that allows scraping from the waterline down to the keel. The bottom of the keel is inaccessible, but it is only a small portion of the underwater area. If there is enough tidal range this operation can be carried out while walking around the hulls. The Chesapeake does not have enough tidal range.
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I used an ice scraper/chopper from Harbor Freight, item #60572. A boat hook was duct taped to it to extend its 48” handle. The work was going to be done from the inflatable dinghy. It turned out that positioning the dinghy stern-to helped, the ends of the dinghy inflated tubes kept the transom away from the side of the catamaran hull, providing a stable work platform and defining the area to be scraped.
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On my task list the scraping job was expected to take two days, 4 hours each day. The work went quickly though, and it was all done in one awful day. It turned out that extending the handle wasn't necessary and work went faster with just the scraping tool. I remember getting nasty blisters the last time, so work gloves were necessary.
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A line was tied off from the bow to the stern and tensioned so that I could use it to keep the dinghy in place and also press it against the hull. The worst aspect of the job was getting into the spider webs under the crossdeck. Otherwise, the job was completed by the end of the day and I was off to the showers.
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A bunch of parts came in all at once including the engine gas filter replacement element, the last few sail track bolts, epoxy syringes, and while at the store I bought a few Mountain House feeze-dried meals. Freeze dried meals were recommended by Webb Chiles and the fellow who writes “The Log of the Spartina”.
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We had already tested two meals that were free samples, a beef macaroni meal from Daily Bread, and Fettuccine Alfredo from Wise. The macaroni was good but the fettucine was excellent. I like to cook and don't like the idea of prepackaged meals. It is a good idea however to have something on hand in case refrigeration dies or you get stuck on your way to reprovision in port.
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The engine fuel filter was a quick change and it fired right up. It ran up to temperature and seemed to be operating just fine. The sail track bolts were installed completing that job. The To Do list was getting shorter and if we had to take the boat out she'd be ready to go with a clean bottom and a smooth running engine.
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The helm station on deck had been covered with a tarp over the winter and it was still there, waiting for a weather cover for the little instrument panel. This panel has gauges and switches for navigation lights, depthsounder, the horn, windlass controls. My idea for a weather cover was to use a plastic food storage container that had a water tight lid and cut the bottom off and attach it over the instrument panel. The food container was a Rubber Maid deviled egg tray. The bottom was cut out with the multitool, the edges were profiled to the panel and helm station, and siliconed into position. The tarp was folded up and put away. The plastic weather cover now would have to be painted to prevent u/v degradation.
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The picture is of the helm station instrument panel.
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