Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
14 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
09 January 2024 | St Marys, GA
23 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
10 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
25 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
03 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
26 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
17 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
11 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
04 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
20 September 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
Recent Blog Posts
23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Inside Seams

Day two of the dinghy build started out with me finishing wiring the hull bottoms together on the centerline of the bottom panels. This was much easier than the wiring of the chine edges of the bottom panels and the side panels.

15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Dinghy Day One

A Wharram Pahi 26 had been anchored in the river nearby the boatyard and was hauled out with the travel lift. I went around to look at it and talked to the owner couple. I was surprised that it had been built in Martinique in 1988. The boat is more than 30 years old.

11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Redux

The inflatable (deflatable) dinghy I had bought was deteriorating. It had bottom seams separating. It is a West Marine branded dinghy made out of PVC. HH66 is the adhesive to reattach the seams. A friend had a similar problem and bought the same adhesive. I was waiting to hear from him how it worked [...]

06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

The Clincher

We decided to go to Amelia Island for the day, probably to the beach. Our plan to cycle around on the Raleigh 20’s seemed like a bad idea, Bleu can’t keep up with a bicycle for very long and when he quits he quits. So we would walk, where?, Fort Clinch State Park. She has a forever pass for Florida [...]

26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA

Zen and Bike Maintenance

Eloisa rolled into the boatyard after a long drive down from the mountains. It was getting cold and isolated up there. I had a nasty toothache and we went to Southern River Walk. Bleu, her black American cocker was showing a bit of plumpness. I had had a sandwich and some wine already, so I didn’t [...]

14 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA

Sink the Bismarck

I continued reading Richard J Evans - The Coming of the Third Reich. It is chilling to read how a cultured, disciplined country can descend into a horrible Armageddon, not once, but twice, and bring the whole world into wars of might and ignorance. I don't know politics, but this book is a revelation. [...]

S-S-Shakedown!

01 October 2013 | Bodkin inlet/Chesapeake Bay
Capn Andy/perfect weather
Here's how the blog should have started:
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The weather forecast was for dry weather for the next week, plus comfortable working temperatures. I was itching to take the boat out for a shakedown sail, but it would be imprudent to waste perfect conditions for a little epoxy work. There were at least 3 areas that were giving warning signs. The most obvious was a patch of deck on the starboard hull above the forward bunk. It had been repaired before, but now it had checked and looked like the wood substrate had failed. Another area was discovered while installing beam #4. On the starboard end, the gunwale stringer was soft. It extended into the pilothouse, but was fine there. It also extended aft into the storage space just in front of the sternpost. It could be inspected within this space to see if the rot came that far. Finally, a third warning area was the port stempost. It had signs of needing similar repair to that done on the sternposts.
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Instead it starts like this:
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The weather forecast was for west wind at 5-10 knots. The idea of taking the boat out and taking a break from the work grind began to take hold of me. The decks were cleared of tools and hosed down. The jib sheets for the genoa and staysail were organized and the mainsail cover came off. The engine was started and warmed up. The wind in the inlet was from the east, not the west, so the mainsail couldn't be raised without getting underway.
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The main was hoisted using my new technique. Hoist the sail with the boom supported by the lazy jacks and the topping lift. This puts the sail down near the cockpit and allows the sail cover to be secured to the boom with bungee straps. When the sail gets up high enough to begin to hoist the boom, tie off the halyard. Hoist the boom up to normal height with the topping lift. Resume hoisting sail, now without the weight of the boom. The last couple of feet of hoist is with the halyard winch. Then release the topping lift and tie off the excess lazy jacks.
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The lazy jacks on Kaimu are unusual in that they are not adjustable. There are no blocks or cleats. They are tied off up on the mast and on the boom. When the boom is lowered, the lazy jacks become taught and the sail can be lowered directly onto the boom and sail cover. The boom is at a height that allows sail cover to be removed or zipped over the furled mainsail.
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Up the main channel of the inlet we had to motor into the east wind. At the dogleg in the channel that points north into the bay the genoa was rolled out, the engine cut and raised, and the boat settled into a close reach in the light wind. We were finally sailing.
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Out in the bay the wind the wind veered to the south, but it was very light, about 4 knots, so apparent wind made us close hauled on a course to the east toward Rock Hall on the Eastern Shore. There were a couple of other boats out, one motoring, another parallel to us and to windward. They looked like a big sloop, heeled over quite a bit with a huge gennaker. I could see we were slowly gaining on them. I set the staysail. The water was gurgling at the bows and a line from the dinghy was dragging in the water bouncing along on the little wavelets.
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There was a small sloop to the north struggling along and not making much way. It was a beautiful day and an occasional gust of wind would come through and push us along, then the sails would slat as we slowed back down. I guessed we were sailing about wind speed although I didn't bother to boot up the computer to see.
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After a while I had had enough, we tacked over to port and headed for port. The wind never came up from the west and we were close hauled on the way back. We tacked up the dog leg into the inlet, bore off and reached almost to the dock. At the last part of the inlet I saw a flag indicating west wind, but we were reaching under a south wind. I quickly lowered the engine, started it, and began securing sails. It did not come from the west, it didn't come from any where. The wind totally died and the boat was brought right to the head of the dock at “a speed no greater than that which you want to hit it”.
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Now we could get back to work.
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