Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
19 April 2018 | st marys, ga
15 April 2018 | st marys, ga
14 April 2018 | st marys, ga
05 April 2018 | st marys, ga
04 April 2018 | st marys, ga
31 March 2018 | st marys, ga
29 March 2018 | st marys, ga
25 March 2018 | st marys, ga
24 March 2018 | st marys, ga
23 March 2018 | st marys, ga
23 March 2018 | st marys, ga
19 March 2018 | st marys, ga
17 March 2018 | st marys, ga
17 March 2018 | st marys, ga
14 March 2018 | st marys, ga
04 March 2018 | st marys, ga
03 March 2018 | st marys, ga
01 March 2018 | st marys, ga
26 February 2018 | st marys, ga
26 February 2018 | st marys, ga
Recent Blog Posts
19 April 2018 | st marys, ga

Pulled Pork and Cole Slaw

I worked on the fuel tank and finished applying fairing mixture on the port side of the port hull, below the waterline. The fuel tank was coated with epoxy and sanded, then painted with rustoleum enamel to protect the epoxy. I was told that it wasn’t necessary to wet sand the epoxy into the metal, [...]

15 April 2018 | st marys, ga

Hyper Collage

I said I would look for Mel’s hole and it’s on wikipedia at:

14 April 2018 | st marys, ga

Goodbye Art Bell

The work on Kaimu was delayed by the little "20 hour" dinghy project. I was hustling along, but careful not to make any mistakes. Some were saying they hadn't seen me working like this. I knew I was trying to make up time lost, but fortunately, my normal pace doesn't have to be accelerated that much [...]

05 April 2018 | st marys, ga

D4 at Rest

After 3 coats of gloss white had been applied to the dinghy hull I left it to dry while we went out for burgers at the gas station restaurant. The hull was dry to the touch when we returned and I removed the masking tape, turned the dinghy upright and removed the masking tape and plastic from the seats. [...]

04 April 2018 | st marys, ga

D4 Paint Job

After the interior of the dinghy got its last coat of epoxy, the foam pieces that fill the voids under the seats were forced into place. One of the bulkheads that is the aft seat riser for the midships seat was bowed inward and the foam pieces forced it out straight. Good. Now the foam pieces had [...]

31 March 2018 | st marys, ga

D4 ETL

Here is a link to a time lapse video of laminating the gunwales on the D4 dinghy:

Blockhead

02 December 2017 | st marys, ga
Capn Andy/chilly Fall
Now we have been hoisted up higher and blocked about 24 inches off the ground. This was in the works for a long time. It was very difficult to get any work done on the bottom of the boat with the center of the keel only about 4 inches off the ground. It was hard to even look at the damage on the keel. Now I could get a good look.
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The procedure for raising Kaimu higher and blocking it higher is interesting and a bit more complicated than you’d expect. The travel lift that is normally used for lifting boats isn’t wide enough to fit Kaimu, so it has to be lifted by crane.
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First a forklift arrives with a pile of wood blocks about 2 feet long and look like they were cut from 4X6 stock. The yardbird with the forklift starts piling up a stack of 8 blocks at each of the four corners of the boat. I comment that he is a bit old to be playing with blocks. He makes another trip after setting the pallet with remaining blocks near the boat, if we should need extras. He returns with a pallet with four pads that are placed on the ground for the crane’s hydraulic feet to rest on. These feet extend out from the crane’s frame to provide support and help prevent the crane tipping over. The pads are about 4 feet on a side and about 4 inches thick of laminated plywood. They are almost too heavy to move, but the forklift operator hustles around and puts the pads where he thinks the crane will need them. He goes off and returns again with two pallets stacked on top of one another, one pallet has coils of heavy cable, the other has very large hoisting straps rolled up on it. He puts the straps near the bow and stern of the boat. Each strap is about 60 feet long and about 10 inches wide X about 1 1/2 inches thick. The crane is rated at 50 tons and has a computer that prevents hoisting a load that will topple the crane. Because catamarans have so much beam, the crane has to lift them boomed out so far that the heaviest lift is about 10 tons. The two Lagoons we delivered recently were just under this weight. Kaimu is about 8 1/2 tons by the crane’s reconning, but my own calculations put it at around 7 tons.
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The crane then arrives under its own power and parks behind the boat and lined up with one of the pads for the crane’s feet. The foot is on a beam that extends out from the crane under hydraulic power, then the foot is deployed downward under hydraulic power. The foot at the other end of the crane is extended and its pad is put into position, then the foot is lowered. Both of these pads are on the side of the crane towards the boat, the feet on the other side are simply extended and lowered to the ground without pads.
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The crane is telescopic and extends up to around 90 feet and lowers its hook. The heavy cables are attached and consist of two cables, you can call them port and starboard, and each of them has two cables you could call fore and aft. They are hoisted up and the crane pivots toward the boat, positioning the cables above the deck. Meanwhile the large straps are pulled underneath the boat so that the ends are equal length on either side of the boat. There is one strap forward and one aft, the ends are put up on deck and each end is attached to one of the four cables. The attachment is with very large D shackles. The pins are about 1 1/2 inches in diameter.
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The crane now takes up the slack in the straps and they are carefully positioned on the hull(s) so that they are lifting at a strong point. We used the positions of the crossbeams as an indicator of where the hull is strongest. So, one strap was lifting at beam #1 and the other at beam #4. The boat is blocked at beams 2 and 3. The boat is then carefully lifted and the blocks are laid down in a box pattern, 4 layers high, then the old blocks which are larger are laid on top of the stack. Wedges are used to fill in gaps between the keel and the blocks. The boat is carefully lowered until it is supported only by the blocks.
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The reverse procedure goes more quickly, especially when the forklift operator leaves the heavy straps on the ground. He said they had “Whupped me”. He came back the next day to retrieve them.
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The difference in grinding on the hull with it up about two feet higher was significant and a lot of progress was made in the next couple of days. The photo is of one of the stacks of blocks.
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