Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
18 August 2018 | North River, St. Marys, GA
15 August 2018 | st marys, ga
14 August 2018 | st marys, ga
12 August 2018 | st marys, ga
09 August 2018 | st marys, ga
06 August 2018 | St Marys, GA
04 August 2018 | st marys, ga
29 July 2018 | st marys, ga
26 July 2018 | St Marys, GA
22 July 2018 | St Marys, GA
16 July 2018 | st marys, ga
09 July 2018 | st marys, ga
05 July 2018 | st marys, ga
04 July 2018 | st marys, ga
01 July 2018 | Brooklyn, Connecticut
26 June 2018 | st marys, ga
26 June 2018 | st marys, ga
23 June 2018 | st marys, ga
22 June 2018 | St Marys, GA
18 June 2018 | st marys, ga
Recent Blog Posts
18 August 2018 | North River, St. Marys, GA

Clayton Place: Launchie Launchie

The intrigue in the boatyard continues, at one time I suggested that it be filmed as a reality TV show. Now someone has suggested a title, Clayton Place, Clayton being the young son of the boatyard’s owner. Clayton’s mother has returned and has to go into rehab.

15 August 2018 | st marys, ga

Nonthreatening Balaclava

The outrigger canoe was launched and the comment was gee, this moves so easily. A Navy tug came in to be hauled out and I paddled the canoe to the other end of the docks only to find another boat coming in, this one being towed in. I tied the canoe up and thought about taking a picture of it. Events [...]

14 August 2018 | st marys, ga

HMS Puffington

Things are changing in the boatyard at a time of year when nothing happens here. I am looking at the launch window for Kaimu and having to step forward and find out if there is any other obstacle, let’s launch this baby.

12 August 2018 | st marys, ga

M/V Gotcha in St. Marys

The Sailing Uma vlog is at:

09 August 2018 | st marys, ga

The Monster Lives

Now I am starting to understand what may have happened to the Yamaha’s water pump. The engine ran pretty well when we got up here 2 1/2 years ago and then sat idle while repairs were made to the boat. Yamaha recommends replacing the water pump impeller every year, regardless of how much use it has [...]

06 August 2018 | St Marys, GA

Next Radio

After the first of the month I quickly scan the online sailing magazines, including Southwinds, and this month they had an article about a smart phone app that can make your smart phone into a radio receiver. I did not know that almost every smart phone in the US has AM/FM radio functionality built [...]

M/V Gotcha in St. Marys

12 August 2018 | st marys, ga
Capn Andy/100 degrees F.
The Sailing Uma vlog is at:
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https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXbWsGV_cjG3gOsSnNJPVlg/videos
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It is very popular among the sailors here in the boatyard. It is a young couple who are cruising on a boat they rehabilitated themselves. Very well done.
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However, in one of the latest episodes they replace their propane stove with an alcohol stove and claim it heats up a pot of water even faster than the propane stove. Alcohol is certainly safer as it won’t form an explosive mixture in your bilge. But I don’t think their test of quickness to heat water is valid.
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On Kaimu I have used a high end alcohol stove from Sweden and a cheap propane cooktop from Harbor Freight, which seems to have discontinued it. When I was making breakfast on the Origo alcohol stove I would have to wait for the frying pan to heat up and fry the eggs and the tea kettle to boil the water for the coffee. The frying pan was a thin non-stick pan, so there was very little metal to absorb the heat. With the propane stove I started using a cast iron pan and the breakfast experience was very different. As fast as I could put the tea kettle on, start frying the ham and eggs and then add the cheese, I would be trying to put together the cone filter for the coffee and get the coffee into the filter, and sometimes it would be nonstop and breakfast was ready just like that, 2 or 3 minutes.
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I decided to go to the internet and look up the differences between alcohol and propane fuels. The BTU’s/$ is in favor of propane. It is much less expensive to cook with propane. It takes up less space. When I buy alcohol I get it in 1 gallon cans at Lowe’s Lumber. It costs about the same as a backyard grill sized propane refill, and that’s about 15-20 gallons. Plus each gallon of propane will heat more than each gallon of alcohol. Still, I was using the alcohol stove for about 2 years here in the boatyard. There is another feature of propane that usually isn’t considered when comparing to alcohol. Most serious cooks prefer a gas range to an electric range because the control of heat is more precise. When you turn down the flame the heat is brought down immediately. On an electric range there is a lag. On an alcohol stove there is no way to turn down the flame, heat is controlled by a damper that covers part of the flame, reducing the amount of heat getting to the pot. Mine no longer worked, so the stove would be on full blast all the time. I would add just the right amount of alcohol to do the cooking, about 1/3 cup to boil a pint of water.
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Alcohol burns very cleanly but I find there is a reaction to the fumes, watering eyes, that doesn’t occur when cooking with propane. The main drawback of propane is that it is heavier than air, so any leak in the system and your boat becomes a bomb. A gas detection alarm will warn if that condition happens. I use a simple gas grill regulator and the propane tank is on the sole of the dinette, so it is all contained right in one place. No solenoid valves, etc. Religiously turn off the tank when turning off the stove.
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I have been reading the biography of Gabriel García Márquez, “Gabriel García Márquez: A Life”. I remember when he died or when Google highlighted him on his birthday. It is an interesting book and gives background cultural history of the Caribbean coast of Colombia. I have only read a couple of South American authors, V. S. Naipal’s “A Bend in the River”, and Jorge Amado’s “Home is the Sailor”. For a while I thought it was written by Jose Luis Borges, another author and contemporary of Gabito Marquez as Gabriel Garcia Marquez was known.
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The term Banana Republic could refer to coastal Colombia at the turn of the century and the book goes in detail about the political situation and US business and thus our military involvement in the region. I had already read about the Panama Canal, now I could read about how US payment to Colombia for Panama, which was a part of Colombia that we annexed, caused a boom period in Colombia’s economy. At about the same time banana plantations were springing up along the coastal railway and the United Fruit Company, headquartered in Boston at that time, were shipping out huge quantities of bananas, which were a novelty at first, then began a demand for the fruit. The banana trade also inflated the coastal economy bringing jobs and improvements to the area. Telegraph, which Marquez’ father was a telegraph operator, at first, and other infrastructure improvements raised the standard of living. Marquez was raised by his grandparents and thus developed a very adult view of the world. I’m only about 1/4 the way into this book and it is enthralling, so far.
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With the engine project out of the way I could continue organizing the work area around Kaimu. Tools could be put away, and supplies had to be stowed. The boatyard suggested I put stuff on pallets, not on board, so that Kaimu would be as light as possible. The path to the edge of the water where catamarans have been launched lately is blocked by a half dozen boats, all of which would have to be moved to launch there. When we were hauled out by crane it was at the other corner of the boatyard where the travel lift well is. We don’t fit in the well, so we were hoisted out of the water outside the well and spun around on shore in front of the well. To do it in reverse and launch Kaimu the device that lifts catamarans is parked under the boat, then it is lifted and moved. The only boats in the way are a large pontoon boat and a couple of sailboats. Much easier for the yard.
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So, all my heavy tool boxes, fuel, and water will be deposited on pallets or on tables located out of the path to the launch. After launching there will be a huge job of ferrying all that stuff to the boat unless the yard lets me tie up alongside, and since the docks are full, I would be tying up alongside some other boat.
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There is or was a green wooden trawler in the boatyard, a bigger boat, maybe 42 feet or even a bit bigger. The elderly couple who cruise in it have had some health problems such that it seemed that they would not be able to get the boat back in the water before the hurricane season. An attempt to launch a few weeks ago resulted in the boat sitting in the travel lift while they waited for the seams in the wood planks to seal up as they swell in the water.
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The caulking in the seams was loose because the boat had sat in the boatyard for a long time drying out. The water came in faster than the bilge pumps could pump it out. The only thing keeping the boat from sinking was that it was still in the straps of the travel lift.
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Now back in the boatyard Ron the carpenter recaulked the hull and now it was put in the well with the travel lift once again. I along with several other yardbirds hung around the travel lift well watching how the boat fared, pumps working quite a bit even though it was only partly lowered into the water. The tide was coming in and I expected more flooding and maybe the boat would have to come out again.
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The owners had added a couple of sump pumps that were not flowing properly, the hoses were collapsing where they hung over the edge of the gunwale. I helped them tie up the hoses so they were straighter and began to put out a lot more water. The report from aboard was that they were holding their own. The tide still had to come up another foot or so and that would add more dry seams that needed to swell up and would leak quite a bit until that happened. Usually it takes a couple days for the wooden hull to swell tight. I could foresee the elderly couple needing help as the sun set and the tide rose. I had to leave though, the first NY Jets preseason football game was starting.
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The next day I did my last epoxy jobs on Kaimu, for a while, the metal hydraulic connections between the long hydraulic lines to the steering ram’s shorter lines were primed with epoxy to stop the rust that had been forming there, the broken swimming ladder step was removed and glued together for the second time, and a loose butt block in the starboard hull was lathered in epoxy and hammered back into position. All this work should have taken about 45 minutes, but it took all day due to the heat and humidity. I had to work for a while, then take a break until I felt able to continue. In late afternoon I was invited to Seagle’s Restaurant in St. Marys for a beer.
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It was cooler right at St. Mary’s waterfront, maybe because we had cooled down with a couple pitchers of beer. The sun was starting to set and I thought, this place isn’t so bad, it was named the prettiest town in Georgia. In Georgia.
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A green motor yacht was coming up the channel, too small to be a shrimper, but wait, is it our elderly couple from the boatyard? Yes, it is them. Their boat doesn’t look like it is in danger. It passed the docks and they waved at the crowd of people in the park listening to a live music concert. There was no room at the dock so they brought their yacht into the middle of the harbor and anchored. Good for them.
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The image is a photo of the green trawler, Gotcha, when it was in the yard getting painted. Photographer is Denis Poirier of s/v Matilda.
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