Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
01 March 2024 | St. Marys, GA
23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA
26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
14 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA
09 January 2024 | St Marys, GA
23 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
10 December 2023 | St Marys, GA
25 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
17 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
03 November 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
26 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
17 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
11 October 2023 | Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield, MD
04 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
03 October 2023 | Alice B. Tawes, McReady Pavilion, Crisfield, Maryland Eastern Shore
Recent Blog Posts
01 March 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Dinghy Alternative Seats

The rain event was more wind than rain, strong winds with gusts up to 44 mph. We drove into town to see what the harbor was like. There was a small sailboat that had dragged anchor and was sitting close to shore. The tide was out. We left and played with Bleu at Notter’s Pond.

23 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Inside Seams

Day two of the dinghy build started out with me finishing wiring the hull bottoms together on the centerline of the bottom panels. This was much easier than the wiring of the chine edges of the bottom panels and the side panels.

15 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Dinghy Day One

A Wharram Pahi 26 had been anchored in the river nearby the boatyard and was hauled out with the travel lift. I went around to look at it and talked to the owner couple. I was surprised that it had been built in Martinique in 1988. The boat is more than 30 years old.

11 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

D4 Redux

The inflatable (deflatable) dinghy I had bought was deteriorating. It had bottom seams separating. It is a West Marine branded dinghy made out of PVC. HH66 is the adhesive to reattach the seams. A friend had a similar problem and bought the same adhesive. I was waiting to hear from him how it worked [...]

06 February 2024 | St. Marys, GA

The Clincher

We decided to go to Amelia Island for the day, probably to the beach. Our plan to cycle around on the Raleigh 20’s seemed like a bad idea, Bleu can’t keep up with a bicycle for very long and when he quits he quits. So we would walk, where?, Fort Clinch State Park. She has a forever pass for Florida [...]

26 January 2024 | St. Marys, GA

Zen and Bike Maintenance

Eloisa rolled into the boatyard after a long drive down from the mountains. It was getting cold and isolated up there. I had a nasty toothache and we went to Southern River Walk. Bleu, her black American cocker was showing a bit of plumpness. I had had a sandwich and some wine already, so I didn’t [...]

St Marys Thanksgiving Week

25 November 2023 | St. Marys, GA
Cap'n Chef Andy | mild
The last two posts represented my accumulated writing while packing a rental car, driving 11 hours South, unpacking, and getting readjusted to the boatyard in St. Marys. It was not convenient to post to the blog during that time.
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We were discussing bolognaise sauce and I thought I had many recipes of it. It ended up I had Martha Stewart’s, which is very good, and the others were recipes I came across on the internet but didn’t download and save.
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This one looks promising, by Mary Berry of The Guardian:
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Generous knob of butter
100g smoked streaky bacon, finely diced
1 onion, finely diced
1 carrot, finely diced
2 sticks celery, finely diced
250g coarsely minced beef, at room temperature
40g chicken liver, finely chopped
150ml whole milk
Nutmeg, to grate
150ml dry white wine
400ml tin plum tomatoes
1. Melt the butter in a large flameproof casserole set over a gentle heat, and then add the bacon. Once the bacon fat has started to melt, add the onion, and cook gently until softened, then tip in the carrot, and cook for 5 minutes before adding the celery and cooking for a further 2 minutes.
2. Crumble the beef into the pan and brown, stirring occasionally to break up any lumps. Season, then stir in the liver, and let it cook for another 5 minutes.
3. Pre-heat the oven to 125C. Pour in the milk, and grate a little nutmeg over the top. Simmer gently until almost all the milk has evaporated, which should take about half an hour.
4. Pour in the wine and the tomatoes and stir well. Put the casserole into the oven, with the lid slightly ajar, and cook for at least 3 hours (4 is even better) until the meat is very tender. Check on it occasionally, and top up with a little water if it seems too dry, although this probably won’t be necessary. Serve with pasta or gnocchi, and grated Parmesan or pecorino cheese.
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Geoff says he never makes it the same way twice. Bolognese has milk or cream in it and just a little tomato, a sauce with more tomato and no dairy would be Neapolitan, what most Americans recognize as meat sauce.
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A fellow named Houston was interested in my old windsurf gear, so we kind of pieced together what he would need to get started. I found that many of the old windsurf parts are not available. He chose an F2 slalom board, carbon mast, adjustable mast base, boom, and a sail which he has yet to pick out. I expect I will end up helping him learn the ancient art of windsurfing.
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I was invited to help make gumbo at Geoff and Karen’s house. This was a massive cook off. I got to chop veggies and also chicken. There was about 4 gallons of gumbo when all was done. Geoff had learned to make gumbo at a place in New Orleans where the chef took him back into the kitchen and he learned they don’t cook gumbo in a pot, it is all done in ovens in baking trays. Geoff follows the tradition pretty closely. He brought us down to Southern River Walk where the place was packed with yacht club members and visiting cruising sailors. We had a couple glasses of wine and returned to the gumbo.
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Geoff made some rice while I learned the NY Jets bungled another game, badly. I drank more wine. We ate out on the porch. I had seconds. This gumbo is good.
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The next day I went with Komputer Ken on errands. I bought ingredients for Ole Mole sauce, a large bowl, a hose nozzle, orange marmalade, natural peanut butter, a bunch of hot dogs, a large salsa jar, and a box of Black Box Pinot Noir. I had been out of wine and it was time to get some more.
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I cleaned up a pot to make my mole sauce in. Well, mole means sauce in Aztec. I used 2 tablespoons of most of the ingredients. A partial list would include chili powder, cumin, cocoa, peanut butter, and orange marmalade. The medium salsa has the tomatoes, onion, and garlic that I would laboriously chop up otherwise. I started with a couple tablespoons of vegetable oil. The only oil I had was EVOO. Also some water, not very much. Heat and mix. When it’s all bubbly, turn off the heat. I’m trying my poaching technique. The hot dogs go in in two batches as well as the large jar of salsa, put some in, bring to a boil, add more. The rule is, when it comes to a boil, mix it, and when you’re sure it is all the same temperature, shut off the heat. Of course it’s covered and it just sits there stewing in its own Mexican juices.
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I was tasting this sauce as it came together and simmered, adjusted the spices, which meant slugging down some pinot noir and having a chili dog. This stuff stains like nobody’s business. Like most complex sauces it was raw and needed time to mellow. I ate one of the dogs with some of the immature sauce. It had its raw sharp edges, but I guess the balance was about right. You can’t adust the spices until the sauce sits for a while.
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The tradition of this sauce is from Mexico, from the very early days, when a pot was brewing and whatever you thought might be OK for the sauce went into the pot. It just kept cooking and food was taken out to be eaten and ingredients were thrown in when they became available. So, there are a million mole recipes and they are regional, mostly because some of the ingredients were indigenous to that region. It’s kind of like barbecue sauce or chili in the USA, the recipes are guarded secrets and they all say they are the best.
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That’s why my attempt at a traditional Mexican sauce is just as valid as any other of the sauces made down there. I’d like to keep things simple, but instead of two dozen ingredients I’m down to a half dozen.
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I kept the chili dogs and mole in the fridge overnight, heated them up again, and poured the concoction into a plastic bowl. Geoff and Karen arrived and took me to the Southern River Walk where other foods were being arrayed on a couple of tables off to the side. Geoff had his 4 gallons of gumbo and a pot of rice.
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The place got crowded and I took my place on a bench seat on the fringe of the crowd. Soon more cruising sailors showed up and it was really crowded. Karen brought me a bowl of gumbo and rice. Geoff exclaimed they ate all the gumbo and all your chili dogs. I don’t think there was much food left. We packed our empty pots and pans and left.
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I hoped to take a day off but the bulk of the Thanksgiving Feast had to be peeled, cut, boiled, roasted, and I went to the kitchen to help. We peeled 20 lbs. of potatoes that were riced and mashed with butter and cream. Then 10 lbs. of carrots were peeled and sliced lengthwise for glazed carrots. Hams and turkey breasts were sliced. Then I was invited for libations at Southern River Walk. I returned to Kaimu to change my shirt and ran into Jimmy, a sailboat owner I had skippered for. He and his family were in town and I suggested the restaurant. There would be appetizers provided by the restaurant but a cash donation was expected.
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The appetizers consisted of mainly chicken wings and spring rolls. There was what looked like a salsa, maybe a corn salsa, and chips. The place was soon jammed with plenty of boat people to talk to.
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When I returned to Kaimu I fielded a couple phone calls that kept me up late. In the morning I texted Geoff “what time” and took a shower. Karen showed up to take me to the kitchen. It was time.
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We ran a couple trays of meat to a home that would heat them up, I think. Then we returned and loaded up the back of the vehicle with trays of food. There was a large pot of gravy and one of cranberries in sauce. The restaurant was starting to crowd up with hungry guests. We uncovered the trays. I thought I would wait till the food line wound down. The restaurant had three sections and an adjacent section was quieter. Geoff and I began a pinot noir bottle from Chile with a third glass for Karen who was running around managing the Feast. She went out to acquire more utensils. I snuck into the end of the food line and had a nice plate of the usual Thanksgiving dinner.
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We finished off a second bottle of wine and eventually made it to their house where I begged some ibuprofen. I had overdone it. The next day they were off on vacation and I took the day easy. The NY Jets played in the first Black Friday NFL game. They lost in embarrassing fashion.
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The image is a night photo of the restaurant where our Thanksgiving Feast took place.
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