Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
16 June 2018 | st marys, ga
12 June 2018 | st marys, ga
10 June 2018 | st marys, ga
07 June 2018 | st marys, ga
04 June 2018 | St Marys, GA
03 June 2018 | St Marys, GA
02 June 2018 | St Marys, GA
27 May 2018 | st marys, ga
26 May 2018 | st marys, ga
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23 May 2018 | st marys, ga
17 May 2018 | st marys, ga
13 May 2018 | st marys, ga
08 May 2018 | st marys, ga
06 May 2018 | st marys, ga
03 May 2018 | st marys, ga
01 May 2018 | st marys, ga
23 April 2018 | st marys, ga
19 April 2018 | st marys, ga
15 April 2018 | st marys, ga
Recent Blog Posts
18 August 2018 | North River, St. Marys, GA

Clayton Place: Launchie Launchie

The intrigue in the boatyard continues, at one time I suggested that it be filmed as a reality TV show. Now someone has suggested a title, Clayton Place, Clayton being the young son of the boatyard’s owner. Clayton’s mother has returned and has to go into rehab.

15 August 2018 | st marys, ga

Nonthreatening Balaclava

The outrigger canoe was launched and the comment was gee, this moves so easily. A Navy tug came in to be hauled out and I paddled the canoe to the other end of the docks only to find another boat coming in, this one being towed in. I tied the canoe up and thought about taking a picture of it. Events [...]

14 August 2018 | st marys, ga

HMS Puffington

Things are changing in the boatyard at a time of year when nothing happens here. I am looking at the launch window for Kaimu and having to step forward and find out if there is any other obstacle, let’s launch this baby.

12 August 2018 | st marys, ga

M/V Gotcha in St. Marys

The Sailing Uma vlog is at:

09 August 2018 | st marys, ga

The Monster Lives

Now I am starting to understand what may have happened to the Yamaha’s water pump. The engine ran pretty well when we got up here 2 1/2 years ago and then sat idle while repairs were made to the boat. Yamaha recommends replacing the water pump impeller every year, regardless of how much use it has [...]

06 August 2018 | St Marys, GA

Next Radio

After the first of the month I quickly scan the online sailing magazines, including Southwinds, and this month they had an article about a smart phone app that can make your smart phone into a radio receiver. I did not know that almost every smart phone in the US has AM/FM radio functionality built [...]

Clayton Place: Launchie Launchie

18 August 2018 | North River, St. Marys, GA
Capn Andy/humid
The intrigue in the boatyard continues, at one time I suggested that it be filmed as a reality TV show. Now someone has suggested a title, Clayton Place, Clayton being the young son of the boatyard’s owner. Clayton’s mother has returned and has to go into rehab.
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Kaimu has been declared ready for sea duty, yet the boatyard seems to be tied up with other projects. “Give us a couple days notice” does not mean what it implies.
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So I had a day to futz around with stuff, Toss more junk into the dumpster. My friend Capn Neil came by and it was my fault of not texting him that the launch has been delayed. We took a quick look at the boatyard, he is contemplating hauling his catamaran out for maintenance, and then went to St. Marys waterfront where we had a late lunch and I had some Sam Smith’s beer (ale) from England. A Britisher had recommended it. It was good.
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Later we walked out on the pavilion that overlooks the harbor and discussed the events of last Autumn when the hurricane and maybe an associated tornado took out most of the downtown waterfront.
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The next day it was launchie launchie in earnest, Boats in the way had to be moved. The Navy tug was blocked up out of the way. The power yacht in the slings of the travel lift was moved out of the way and put on a cradle. Two boats in cradles in front of Kaimu were moved to the side. Vehicles that had parked in the way had to be moved. Finally an alley way was set up and Kaimu moved down to the water. The empty travel lift had to be parked off to the side and the crane had to be parked midway between the travel lift pad and the travel lift well. I ran time lapse videos of some of the activity. Fork lifts brought padded lifting straps and the crane was manned and extended up to its full length. The lifting hook came down and heavy D-rings and shackles hooked together the lifting straps while the cradle mover that had brought Kaimu all the way down to the water deposited her on blocks, moved out of the way, and the yard personnel could roll the straps across underneath the hulls, going topside to shackle it all together, somehow getting me involved and holding one of the straps as the crane took up the slack.
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I hadn’t had breakfast, just coffee, and late morning I had a small, very small, tuna sandwich that was about half the size of a normal sandwich, so I was feeling peckish as they say, but I did what they asked me to do, but sat here and there to recuperate, then would take a picture or two with a camera whose battery was down near zero. Fortunately I think I got most of the good shots, but I can’t download them from the camera until I find a charged battery, or charge its battery. If I find the battery charger, it will be with a charged battery, the other battery.
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The yard tug was tied up in the spot that Kaimu had to be launched in, as well as a misplaced dinghy. They were moved. After I triced up the swimming ladder and went to climb down the extension ladder the yard had used on the starboard side, the extension ladder had been taken away, oops, it came back and I climbed down and dutifully put it away again.
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I had tied on a line on the starboard bow as a tag line to allow them to keep the boat straight as it went up, over the travel lift shed and a small tree there, around and down lower and lower into the space between the travel lift well and the floating dock just to the South of it. I had paced off the space between the well and the dock and it was about 27 feet and Kaimu is 22 feet 3 inches wide. Just fit.
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Now I was running on empty. Put a line on the bow, put a line on the stern, bring a pallet of fuel and tool boxes down to the boat, bring them aboard. Pour the fuel into the main tank, but it won’t work, the angle of the fuel fill prevents the EPA authorized fuel nozzle on the Jerry can from dispensing fuel without also drenching the poor captain, who is allergic to gasoline, in fuel. Fuel has to be decanted into a 2 gallon jug that works very well. The spigot on the 2 gallon jug does not fit the larger jugs.
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There were a couple of very helpful souls who when they show up you feel guilty accepting their help, but whenever you help someone else, it is good for both the recipient and the good samaritan. Colonel Bill offered the Miata to make a provision run, and Bill Mills the pipefitter offered to take me to get more fuel after I filled the main tank. He also had a siphon pump that was broken, which we found out, and after some time the tank was filled and the big jugs were empty, time to go out for fuel.
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At the I-95 exit for Kings Bay is a Flash Foods, (no it is not Flash Floods), that has non-ethanol gas at their pumps and it is only $.25 more than regular gas. We went there.
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I bought Bill and me my lunch and his dinner at Wendy’s, but their men’s room was out of soap and we needed to wash the gasoline off our hands.
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Back at the yard the new fuel wasn’t put in the main tank which was full, just a couple of gallons went into the day tank. The engine started up right away and it idled fine. I backed Kaimu into the outgoing tidal current and the engine stopped. We went sideways for a while. I could start the engine and it seemed like it wanted to run full speed or at idle, the mid-range jets seemed to be at fault, but we managed to keep from crashing into mud bogs, boats tied up to docks, and eventually did a large turning radius U-turn into the outgoing current and worked our way up river to Trillium, the C&C 24 I sold to Doc of Doc’s Chop Shop. Trillium had 4 anchors out and had held fast through 2 hurricanes, so I tied up to it. After rowing back to the boatyard, I brought back the backup navigation laptop I had been using in the woodshop because it had the 2 watt amplified wifi antenna and I hadn’t had any wifi connection out in the river. It worked when I set it up out in the river.
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The image is of the launch just before Kaimu is set down in the water.

Nonthreatening Balaclava

15 August 2018 | st marys, ga
Capn Andy/100 degrees F.
The outrigger canoe was launched and the comment was gee, this moves so easily. A Navy tug came in to be hauled out and I paddled the canoe to the other end of the docks only to find another boat coming in, this one being towed in. I tied the canoe up and thought about taking a picture of it. Events were happening too quickly, though.
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When I went back to Kaimu to get my camera, Rocky, chief crane operator, boatyard owner, and chief logistics officer, was parked nearby. He said he found a way to move Kaimu without using the travel lift to move the pontoon boat that is in the way. “Tomorrow morning” he said. This meant get ready now, and I continued stowing stuff on pallets, making final preparations to move the boat.
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It rained and I went back to the outrigger canoe to bail it out. My design of the outrigger did not come out exactly as I envisioned. The aka’s or arms of the outrigger were angled up too much, but it will be a minor adjustment to angle them lower. The ama or outrigger float was made out of 1/8“ doorskin plywood and it is failing, delaminating, I will have to make a whole new ama and I will use the 5mm Revolution ply from China that has held up so well.
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It rained again and when I returned to bail out the canoe it was hanging from the dock as the tide had gone out.
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Among the debris under Kaimu were the two air mattresses I had used several times. They could be useful again to nap on deck during the day. I blew them up, scrubbed them with Awesome cleaner, hosed them off, and now one of them is obviously losing air. The other seems OK. I only need one of them for about and hour or so at a time. I blow them up with the exhaust of the shop vac and it only takes a minute.
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The scene down at the travel lift well, where Kaimu will be staged for the crane and then craned into the river, is rather jumbled. There is a Navy tug there as well as a good size sloop and the owner and his wife have tons of stuff all over the place, deciding what to put on board and what to take away. They have a similar logistic lack of sense that I do.
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My daughter made a balaclava to my specs. I said it needed to have holes for the nose and mouth to prevent moisture from breath condensing or freezing on it. The image shows how she did it, and I was relieved to see it did not look like a bank robber or terrorist version of the balaclava. Unfortunately I may have gone to sea before it gets here. Small logistics problem.

HMS Puffington

14 August 2018 | st marys, ga
Capn Andy/100 degrees F.
Things are changing in the boatyard at a time of year when nothing happens here. I am looking at the launch window for Kaimu and having to step forward and find out if there is any other obstacle, let’s launch this baby.
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Instead of lading on the boat all the water and fuel and heavy tool boxes, I am going to keep them on the hard and keep the boat as light as possible. It will help the chief crane operator, boatyard owner, and chief logistics officer, Rocky, to know that my catamaran that clocked in at 19 thousand pounds will be closer to the weight when he reblocked the catamaran, about 8 1/2 tons. About a ton less. I can’t imagine the tools, water, and fuel would come to a ton, but I will let him have a lighter boat to launch if he lets me tie up and then load up the boat while it is at the dock.
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I moved the two work tables, covered with tools, etc., to the port side of the port hull, thus out of the way to move the boat. It didn’t take long and I almost gave away one of the tables, but Doc of Doc’s Chop Shop, who would have been the recipient said that he didn’t need it, but he would sell it to someone.
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Doc is now my friend, but I kind of know him. He is personally wealthy and has no real handle on prices for used boat parts. His method is to take the retail price for a boat part, then sell it at about half that. Most of the yardbirds have become disgruntled at this pricing, He is selling, sometimes, parts that have been in use for a decade, underwater, and I don’t think he can ask for some of his prices. But I have had great transactions with him, and I have given him stuff that I could not get rid of, even by donation, but have a lot of value, so let him sell it.
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He bought me a carbonated soft drink at the vending machine run by his fellow yardbird, but not his friend, and I wondered how he could pay a dollar that way. It was very enjoyable to sip the ice cold citrus soda. I didn't often go to the soda machine and spend money there.
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It’s not like I am scurrying away from a bad situation, I am scurrying away from a good boatyard, which I will come back to, but I am scurrying away to the sea with Kaimu, I am the custodian of the boat and I have to let her loose on the sea, and I won’t mind going along again. I reviewed my route plan from the sea buoy at St. Marys Entrance to Cape Hatteras to the mouth of the Chesapeake. On one of the charts the approximate center of the Gulfstream is marked and at this end of the route you’d have to go out about a hundred miles to get to the Gulfstream (you were right Capn Smith), but then off Cape Hatteras it’s only about 40 miles offshore, so I changed the route to get on the Gulfstream conveyor belt and get 30 to 40 miles boost each day. Since the whole route is less than 600 miles and a good rule of thumb is average of 5 knots, that would be 120 hours, or 5 days and with 35 miles boost per day, it would come to more like 4 days, but it will take the first day just to get to the Gulfstream, so 5 days is doable. If I instead go North and sidle over to the Gulfstream, I will save the day of going out of my way to hit the stream, but I won’t get the boost for about 3 days, about half of the trip. Another consideration is we’re taking a boat right out of the boatyard, maybe we should stay closer to shore in case any problems show up.
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So far my experience with the capes of the Carolinas and Virginia has been of unexpected weather, sudden shifts. It’s like it’s own weather pattern there. They definitely have a hard time predicting weather off Cape Hatteras. I remember having breakfast with the windsurfing club at Cape Hatteras at a local diner. The locals are called “Bankers” because it is the Outer Banks where they live. One of the locals said, “I’ve been stuck in sand before and I’ve been stuck in snow before, but I never got stuck in snow and sand at the same time.” He had gotten stuck while fishing in the surf.
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When Kevin, the boatyard master of all mechanical, came around to Kaimu, I thought he was coming to take the outrigger canoe down to the water. It turned out he was only checking the garbage cans to load them on his fork lift to take them to dump into one of the dumpsters. However he agreed to lift the outrigger canoe and bring it down to the water, the garbage cans were far from full, so he left them. We ran through the yard with an 18 foot wide load, the canoe was beam on to the fork lift. Down at the water it was low tide, no launchie launchie. Plus, the area was full of boat stuff, a logistics nightmare, for skipper Rob, who was trying to transition from landlubber to liveaboard ocean cruiser. He had too much stuff.
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Right now the boatyard is hauling out a Navy tugboat tomorrow, Wednesday, and that requires the travel lift. The same travel lift is needed to move a large pontoon boat that is in my way for Kaimu to get down to the water. I can see a couple of days delay already, on top of weeks of delay. Glaciers may be melting away, but glacial activity persists.
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Glaciers, cold weather, hard to think about that in this heat, but my daughter who is doing custom knitting and crochet, plus something called diarama, made me a balaclava. When you google balaclava, most of them look like an Islamic terror headgear, but she thankfully made me one with contrasting stripes. I had just been providing her with nautical head gear ideas, she made this on her own and is sending it to me. She has a Etsy store called handmadebysolywoda. She can make you almost anything. The image is of her diarama of one of her Puffington Pals fishing from a knitted boat called “Kaimu”.

M/V Gotcha in St. Marys

12 August 2018 | st marys, ga
Capn Andy/100 degrees F.
The Sailing Uma vlog is at:
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https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXbWsGV_cjG3gOsSnNJPVlg/videos
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It is very popular among the sailors here in the boatyard. It is a young couple who are cruising on a boat they rehabilitated themselves. Very well done.
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However, in one of the latest episodes they replace their propane stove with an alcohol stove and claim it heats up a pot of water even faster than the propane stove. Alcohol is certainly safer as it won’t form an explosive mixture in your bilge. But I don’t think their test of quickness to heat water is valid.
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On Kaimu I have used a high end alcohol stove from Sweden and a cheap propane cooktop from Harbor Freight, which seems to have discontinued it. When I was making breakfast on the Origo alcohol stove I would have to wait for the frying pan to heat up and fry the eggs and the tea kettle to boil the water for the coffee. The frying pan was a thin non-stick pan, so there was very little metal to absorb the heat. With the propane stove I started using a cast iron pan and the breakfast experience was very different. As fast as I could put the tea kettle on, start frying the ham and eggs and then add the cheese, I would be trying to put together the cone filter for the coffee and get the coffee into the filter, and sometimes it would be nonstop and breakfast was ready just like that, 2 or 3 minutes.
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I decided to go to the internet and look up the differences between alcohol and propane fuels. The BTU’s/$ is in favor of propane. It is much less expensive to cook with propane. It takes up less space. When I buy alcohol I get it in 1 gallon cans at Lowe’s Lumber. It costs about the same as a backyard grill sized propane refill, and that’s about 15-20 gallons. Plus each gallon of propane will heat more than each gallon of alcohol. Still, I was using the alcohol stove for about 2 years here in the boatyard. There is another feature of propane that usually isn’t considered when comparing to alcohol. Most serious cooks prefer a gas range to an electric range because the control of heat is more precise. When you turn down the flame the heat is brought down immediately. On an electric range there is a lag. On an alcohol stove there is no way to turn down the flame, heat is controlled by a damper that covers part of the flame, reducing the amount of heat getting to the pot. Mine no longer worked, so the stove would be on full blast all the time. I would add just the right amount of alcohol to do the cooking, about 1/3 cup to boil a pint of water.
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Alcohol burns very cleanly but I find there is a reaction to the fumes, watering eyes, that doesn’t occur when cooking with propane. The main drawback of propane is that it is heavier than air, so any leak in the system and your boat becomes a bomb. A gas detection alarm will warn if that condition happens. I use a simple gas grill regulator and the propane tank is on the sole of the dinette, so it is all contained right in one place. No solenoid valves, etc. Religiously turn off the tank when turning off the stove.
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I have been reading the biography of Gabriel García Márquez, “Gabriel García Márquez: A Life”. I remember when he died or when Google highlighted him on his birthday. It is an interesting book and gives background cultural history of the Caribbean coast of Colombia. I have only read a couple of South American authors, V. S. Naipal’s “A Bend in the River”, and Jorge Amado’s “Home is the Sailor”. For a while I thought it was written by Jose Luis Borges, another author and contemporary of Gabito Marquez as Gabriel Garcia Marquez was known.
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The term Banana Republic could refer to coastal Colombia at the turn of the century and the book goes in detail about the political situation and US business and thus our military involvement in the region. I had already read about the Panama Canal, now I could read about how US payment to Colombia for Panama, which was a part of Colombia that we annexed, caused a boom period in Colombia’s economy. At about the same time banana plantations were springing up along the coastal railway and the United Fruit Company, headquartered in Boston at that time, were shipping out huge quantities of bananas, which were a novelty at first, then began a demand for the fruit. The banana trade also inflated the coastal economy bringing jobs and improvements to the area. Telegraph, which Marquez’ father was a telegraph operator, at first, and other infrastructure improvements raised the standard of living. Marquez was raised by his grandparents and thus developed a very adult view of the world. I’m only about 1/4 the way into this book and it is enthralling, so far.
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With the engine project out of the way I could continue organizing the work area around Kaimu. Tools could be put away, and supplies had to be stowed. The boatyard suggested I put stuff on pallets, not on board, so that Kaimu would be as light as possible. The path to the edge of the water where catamarans have been launched lately is blocked by a half dozen boats, all of which would have to be moved to launch there. When we were hauled out by crane it was at the other corner of the boatyard where the travel lift well is. We don’t fit in the well, so we were hoisted out of the water outside the well and spun around on shore in front of the well. To do it in reverse and launch Kaimu the device that lifts catamarans is parked under the boat, then it is lifted and moved. The only boats in the way are a large pontoon boat and a couple of sailboats. Much easier for the yard.
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So, all my heavy tool boxes, fuel, and water will be deposited on pallets or on tables located out of the path to the launch. After launching there will be a huge job of ferrying all that stuff to the boat unless the yard lets me tie up alongside, and since the docks are full, I would be tying up alongside some other boat.
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There is or was a green wooden trawler in the boatyard, a bigger boat, maybe 42 feet or even a bit bigger. The elderly couple who cruise in it have had some health problems such that it seemed that they would not be able to get the boat back in the water before the hurricane season. An attempt to launch a few weeks ago resulted in the boat sitting in the travel lift while they waited for the seams in the wood planks to seal up as they swell in the water.
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The caulking in the seams was loose because the boat had sat in the boatyard for a long time drying out. The water came in faster than the bilge pumps could pump it out. The only thing keeping the boat from sinking was that it was still in the straps of the travel lift.
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Now back in the boatyard Ron the carpenter recaulked the hull and now it was put in the well with the travel lift once again. I along with several other yardbirds hung around the travel lift well watching how the boat fared, pumps working quite a bit even though it was only partly lowered into the water. The tide was coming in and I expected more flooding and maybe the boat would have to come out again.
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The owners had added a couple of sump pumps that were not flowing properly, the hoses were collapsing where they hung over the edge of the gunwale. I helped them tie up the hoses so they were straighter and began to put out a lot more water. The report from aboard was that they were holding their own. The tide still had to come up another foot or so and that would add more dry seams that needed to swell up and would leak quite a bit until that happened. Usually it takes a couple days for the wooden hull to swell tight. I could foresee the elderly couple needing help as the sun set and the tide rose. I had to leave though, the first NY Jets preseason football game was starting.
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The next day I did my last epoxy jobs on Kaimu, for a while, the metal hydraulic connections between the long hydraulic lines to the steering ram’s shorter lines were primed with epoxy to stop the rust that had been forming there, the broken swimming ladder step was removed and glued together for the second time, and a loose butt block in the starboard hull was lathered in epoxy and hammered back into position. All this work should have taken about 45 minutes, but it took all day due to the heat and humidity. I had to work for a while, then take a break until I felt able to continue. In late afternoon I was invited to Seagle’s Restaurant in St. Marys for a beer.
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It was cooler right at St. Mary’s waterfront, maybe because we had cooled down with a couple pitchers of beer. The sun was starting to set and I thought, this place isn’t so bad, it was named the prettiest town in Georgia. In Georgia.
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A green motor yacht was coming up the channel, too small to be a shrimper, but wait, is it our elderly couple from the boatyard? Yes, it is them. Their boat doesn’t look like it is in danger. It passed the docks and they waved at the crowd of people in the park listening to a live music concert. There was no room at the dock so they brought their yacht into the middle of the harbor and anchored. Good for them.
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The image is a photo of the green trawler, Gotcha, when it was in the yard getting painted. Photographer is Denis Poirier of s/v Matilda.

The Monster Lives

09 August 2018 | st marys, ga
Capn Andy/100 degrees F.
Now I am starting to understand what may have happened to the Yamaha’s water pump. The engine ran pretty well when we got up here 2 1/2 years ago and then sat idle while repairs were made to the boat. Yamaha recommends replacing the water pump impeller every year, regardless of how much use it has gotten. The reason is the vanes on the impeller get set and lose their flexibility, so they no longer function properly. When I replaced the impeller I did some tests when the engine’s overheat alarm went off. I didn’t expect the impeller to disintegrate. I think the impeller and the stainless steel cup it ran in overheated due to lack of water flow. This destroyed the impeller and made the cup melt the housing and distorted the housing.
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A new housing is on its way and I expect that will be the missing link to fix the pump. I will use a tub to provide water to the lower unit and not use the ear muffs. If it works, we are good to go.
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The engine is old but probably has about a thousand hours on it. This is like a car with about 40,000 miles. If it runs OK it will continue for quite a while. It’s more like a motorcycle engine than a car engine, and 40,000 miles is a lot for a motorcycle.
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50 horsepower is more than necessary to propel this boat, plus a smaller engine would weigh less, consume less fuel, and might be simpler, easier to maintain. Fuel injection would be preferable to the multiple carburettors on the 50 HP. I’ve looked at alternatives and they are not too expensive, matching the engine mount and controls might be. I will wait and see how things work out with this engine. I know it pretty well know, like the partner or wife who has some bad points as well as some good points. The pretty new little engine might have new problems, or it might be a blessing.
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It turned out the advice I got to run it in a tub and not with the earmuffs was good advice. This eliminates any problems with air leaks because the lower unit is down in the water, not up in the air with water piped into the inlets. There is air inside the lower unit and the pump will suck air and not water and then overheating.
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I borrowed a 55 gallon plastic drum with a bolt in the bottom to drain the water when I am done. Because the boat is blocked up so high, I had to put the drum up on a scaffold and some more blocks to get it high enough. I filled the drum and started the engine and everything went along smoothly. I was out of fuel again with no overheat alarm and the tell tale pisser was putting out a good stream. Some people call this the man at the dock. It is officially a water flow indicator.
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More fuel and no problems except now the engine won’t come down to it’s original idle. This is usually caused by idle jet blockage, which I had serviced last summer. I don’t want to demount the 4 carburettors and do all that all over again. A work around is to add a temporary spacer between the idle adjustment screw and the #3 carburettor butterfly arm. This will allow the neutral throttle control, which prevents shifting unless it is all the way down to idle, to be closed down while the engine still runs at idle speed using the midrange jets. In this case the engine will not have enough torque to shift into gear without stalling. The technique to get into gear is kind of brutal, you run the engine at high idle speed, then shut down the idle throttle to nothing, then jam the motor into forward or reverse before it stalls. It’s bad on the gear change which is something like a dog clutch.
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At some point usually the idle jets get clear, then you have to remove the spacer from the idle adjustment. If not, the engine will idle very high and be unusable to get into gear. I had a motorcycle that did this once at a traffic light. It started revving up and up. It sounded like a grand prix car getting ready for a big race. I had to walk it over to the side and turn down the idle control which was thankfully easy to do. It ran fine afterwards.
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During my waiting time when it might be thunderstorming or I might be waiting for parts, I have been on YouTube and watching chess matches. Also lots of chess instructions. I could play OK when I was younger, but chess is like a sport, you have to practice and keep up your skills. There is some mystery about chess because a prodigy comes along and it looks like for all your practice you might be better well served by getting some good chess genes.
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It turns out that the hereditary theory about chess genes might not be as important as the early training theory, it’s nurture vs nature. A Hungarian psychologist named Laslo Polgar thought it was the training, champions are made not born. He purposely home schooled his first daughter to play chess. He himself was not a good chess player, but he read books on how to teach and coach chess. His wife had no chess abilities at all. She just provided him with 3 daughters who each went on to great success in the world of chess. The least proficient of the daughters won several gold medals. The oldest daughter became champion of the world. The remaining daughter was not thought to be the brightest, but she worked the hardest at her game, and she became the greatest female chess player who ever lived. Judit Polgar. She beat all the best grandmasters of the world. She became grandmaster at 15 and beat Bobby Fischer’s record as youngest grandmaster.
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In chess as in music I admire those who have that proficiency that the rest of us can only wonder at. It is impossible to be the best at everything, so most of us struggle with problems that would be trivial to a proficient person.
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And so I have been advised to back off of my drive to launch and sail North, wait out the hurricane season, don’t push off now. The man I consider my sailing icon if not mentor is Webb Chiles, who is planning to set off Sept. to sail North. OK, if he goes, I go, and if I go, I bet he goes. Sailing North needs the prevailing SE flow from the Bermuda High and the Gulfstream flowing North to make it possible to get North of Cape Hatteras in good fashion before a tropical storm hits. When I was sailing South into my wreckage, it was during a Norther, which after November becomes a recurring weather phenomenon. It would be difficult to sail North in those conditions, even motoring in the ICW.
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So now it is 6 weeks past our June 28 launch dater, we will not talk about that anymore.
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I put a piece of scotch tape on the carburettor butterfly arm that contacts the idle screw and put a blob of JB weld on the end of the screw right up to the scotch tape. The idle screw is stainless steel into aluminum and is seized up, so no adjustment. The JB weld hardened overnight and in the morning I started the engine and was able to warm it up, put the neutral throttle all the way closed, the JB weld kept the carburettors open enough to keep running while I shifted into forward. This stalled the engine several times but when I throttled up in neutral then quickly shut the neutral throttle control and shifted into forward the engine didn’t stall and put out a burst that spilled a lot of water out of the 55 gallon drum. I then shut the engine, drained the drum, and put it away.
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The image is from yamahaoutboards.com and is exploded view of the carburettor linkage. The idle screw is on the third from the top.

Next Radio

06 August 2018 | St Marys, GA
Capn Andy/humid
After the first of the month I quickly scan the online sailing magazines, including Southwinds, and this month they had an article about a smart phone app that can make your smart phone into a radio receiver. I did not know that almost every smart phone in the US has AM/FM radio functionality built in. It is not a feature that any cellular service provider advertises, because not only wouldn’t the provider not get any revenue from the app, the customer using the app would not be streaming and thus paying for data. In fact, my phone was originally from Verizon and Verizon’s phones have firmware that disables the radio chip, so I will never be able to receive a local radio station directly off the air.
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In the case of natural disaster, such as a hurricane, often the internet goes down due to downed wires. Emergency information can usually be picked up on VHF radio weather channels, but being able to receive local radio would be an important safety resource. I think Verizon’s blocking of the radio chip is a public disservice.
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When I installed the app, called Next Radio, it did a quick search of local stations, but due to the radio chip being disabled it then went into a streaming radio mode through the boatyards wireless internet. I listened to a few stations and finally landed on WFAN sports radio out of NYC.
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When I first started living aboard in Connecticut while employed in Stamford I didn’t have a TV on the boat. I listened to WFAN or NPR. So, it was a nostalgic moment when I began listening to WFAN again, nice to hear the New York accents again after all this time in Georgia hearing various drawls. The main topic on the radio was a New York Yankee/Boston Red Sox series in which Boston swept the Yankees. I will probably tune in again sometime.
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The image is Next Radio’s logo from their website.
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