SV Kiviuq

A journal of the sailing vessel Kiviuq and her owners Marilou Kosseim and Alan Teale

Vessel Name: Kiviuq
Vessel Make/Model: Van de Stadt Madeira 46
Hailing Port: Inverness
Crew: Marilou Kosseim and Alan Teale
About: Marilou is a Canadian national, retired physician and Consultant Obstetrician/Gynaecologist. Alan is a British national, retired veterinary surgeon and animal molecular geneticist. Both are currently UK-based and members of the Ocean Cruising Club.
Extra:
Kiviuq is a van de Stadt Madeira 46 in alloy, with round bilge and deeper draft options. The 46 is the scoop stern variant of the van de Stadt Madeira 44, the scoop being developed by the builder, Alexander Beisterveld of Beisterveld Jachtbouw in Steenwijk, Netherlands. Kiviuq is rigged as a [...]
13 September 2019 | Shining Waters Marine, Tantallon, Nova Scotia
05 September 2019 | St Margaret's Bay, Nova Scotia
22 August 2019 | Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia
13 August 2019 | LaHave Islands, Nova Scotia
04 August 2019 | Yarmouth, Nova Scotia
28 July 2019 | Head Harbour, Campobello, New Brunswick
11 July 2019 | Belfast, Maine
07 July 2019 | Belfast, Maine
06 July 2019 | Belfast, Maine
13 June 2019 | Belfast, Maine
01 June 2019 | Burnside Lodge
15 September 2018 | Belfast, Maine, Nova Scotia
30 August 2018 | St Peters, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia
18 August 2018 | Bay La Hune, Newfoundland
10 August 2018 | Isle aux Morts, Newfoundland
04 August 2018 | Baddeck, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia
30 July 2018 | St Peters, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia
26 July 2018 | Spanish Ship Bay, Eastern Shore, Nova Scotia
14 July 2018 | Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia
06 July 2018 | Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Recent Blog Posts
13 September 2019 | Shining Waters Marine, Tantallon, Nova Scotia

Dorian and the aftermath

We rode out Hurricane Dorian at anchor in Schooner Cove together with four other foreign boats that came in for the same purpose. All the boats rode safely to their best bower anchors, I suspect on long chain scopes of 10:1 or more. We certainly did. It seems that the latest consensus among the cruising [...]

05 September 2019 | St Margaret's Bay, Nova Scotia

Waiting for Dorian

It was going to happen sooner or later. A hurricane is heading our way. After devastating the Abacos and Bahamas and brushing Florida, Dorian is now close E of the coast of the Carolinas, and the current forecast is that it will go right over Nova Scotia on Saturday/Sunday moving quickly in a NNE'ly [...]

22 August 2019 | Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia

Downward and upward

I realise there is quite a lot of catching up to do since my last post, which left us in Grand Manan, so apologies if this becomes something of a travelogue.

13 August 2019 | LaHave Islands, Nova Scotia

Boarded!

After St Andrews it was time to begin making our way across the Bay of Fundy towards Nova Scotia. This we decided to do in two stages. The first involved retracing our wake across Passamaquoddy Bay and around the southern end of Deer Island, then up Head Harbour Passage to the northern tip of Campobello [...]

04 August 2019 | Yarmouth, Nova Scotia

Things that go bump in the night.

From Campobello we sailed southabout Deer Island, an area renowned for its cetacean populations (and thus also populated with whale-watching boats), into Passamaquody Bay and up to St Andrews. Here we picked up a mooring just 150m or so off Market Wharf, the large and well-appointed town wharf.

28 July 2019 | Head Harbour, Campobello, New Brunswick

Going Downeast

We left Belfast just over a week ago on Saturday 20th July to sail down Penobscot Bay with the intention of spending a night at anchor in Seal Bay, Vinalhaven. Seal Bay is beautiful, well protected and not that far from the popular yachting centres of Camden and Rockland. Perhaps for this reason it was [...]

Every boat needs a Marilou

14 July 2018 | Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia
Alan
We weighed anchor in Lunenburg yesterday morning a little before 0900hrs, in the process of which Marilou had the first of her morning workouts. Marilou does most of the anchoring work in Kiviuq while Alan poses in skipper mode at the helm ready to take control of the boat when the anchor breaks out. Of course the windlass takes care of the really heavy work involved in anchor and chain handling but harbours like Lunenburg add an extra task. The bottom is soft mud that was down there hundreds of years ago when Lunenburg's attractions for fishermen and seafarers began to be noticed. A lot of vessels of all kinds have anchored in there over those many years and, in consequence, the soft mud on the bottom is far from pristine. As the chain comes in it comes with a liberal coating of a microbiologist's nightmare that we certainly don't want in our chain locker. Now, unlike ships and some yachts Kiviuq does not possess a sophisticated pressure water chain wash system. The chain cleaning is done with bucketful after bucketful of seawater hauled up by hand. Each bucketful must weigh eight or nine kilos and if there is plenty of chain out, as we had out in Lunenburg due to a near miss from a hurricane, about thirty bucketfuls are required. And each must be lifted about four metres. It's quite a lot of work, sometimes enough to cause the skipper to break into a sweat in sympathy.

Once the chain and anchor were safely stowed we got underway for the passage round to Mahone Bay, which as the crow flies is a very short distance, but as the boat sails about 15nm or so due to intervening headlands.

Once into Mahone Bay, and making for Mahone Bay town, we found ourselves with 10kts or so of breeze on the starboard quarter and felt this was a good opportunity to get the big yellow asymmetric spinnaker out with the primary purpose of furling it again, but this time on the torsion rope of the Karver furling system. We had brought it down in the traditional manhandling manner on previous use as we approached Lunenburg because of a broken locking pin in the Karver furler. On reflection that probably wasn't necessary, but it seemed like a good idea at the time. As a result it was loosely bagged rather than neatly and tightly rolled around its torsion rope, and thus was occupying twice as much space in our forecabin as it should have been.

Hoisting from the bag was not without hitches, and a small section of the sail actually got into the water at one point. Only those who have had this experience know how difficult it can be to recover a large sail from the water, but we were onto it quickly and after a joint heaving effort we had it back aboard and then Marilou completed the hoist without further trouble.

Ater sailing with the asymmetric for a short while sea room was running out and the skipper wanted to see it properly furled and back in its bag. Furling without the locking pin in the system is more laborious than with the pin preventing unfurling again between heaves on the furling line, but Marilou engaged the core and put in the upper body work required, generating more sweat on the skipper's brow.

After that we had a quiet run into the Mahone Bay town harbour and set the anchor just to seaward of the mooring field. Why not pick up a mooring you ask? The answer is the Kiviuqs don't like them, and particularly don't like those with unknown credentials. By contrast, the anchor and chain are tried and trusted entities.
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Where is Kiviuq?
Kiviuq's Photos - Main
4 Photos
Created 1 June 2019
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Created 23 August 2016
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Created 22 April 2016
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Created 22 April 2016
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Created 21 April 2016
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Created 20 April 2016
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Created 22 October 2015
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Created 21 May 2014

About & Links

IMPORTANT NOTE: In Map &Tracking above you can see where Kiviuq was located when we last reported a position to the blog. But please be aware that position reporting sometimes goes down. This can be due to a technical problem on board, to a problem with the satellite system or to a problem with the blog site. Therefore...... PLEASE NOTE THAT IN THE EVENT THERE IS NO POSITION REPORTING THIS SHOULD NOT ON ITS OWN BE TAKEN AS AN INDICATION THAT KIVIUQ AND/OR HER CREW ARE IN DIFFICULTIES. Technical/electrical problems are by no means rare at sea in relatively small vessels.