L'Eau Commotion Westabout

An (other) attempt to sail non stop Westabout around the world

Vessel Name: L'Eau Commotion
Vessel Make/Model: Northshore 38
Hailing Port: Brisbane Australia
Crew: Bill Hatfield
09 December 2017 | 3515 Miles to Cape Horn
08 December 2017 | 3580 Miles to Cape Horn
08 December 2017 | 3590 Miles to Cape Horn
08 December 2017 | 3635 Miles to The Horn
07 December 2017 | 3735 Miles to Cape Horn
07 December 2017 | 3750 Miles to Cape Horn
06 December 2017 | 25 Miles North of the Equator
06 December 2017 | 65 Miles North of the Equator
05 December 2017 | 160 Miles North of the Equator
04 December 2017 | 300 Miles North of the Equator
03 December 2017 | 445 Miles to the Equator
03 December 2017 | 465 Miles to the Equator
02 December 2017 | 540 Miles to Penedas
01 December 2017 | 655 Miles to Penedas
30 November 2017 | 755 Miles to Penedas
29 November 2017 | 835 Miles to Penedas
28 November 2017 | 15 Miles East of Ilha do Maio
27 November 2017 | 80 Miles to Boa Vista
26 November 2017 | 210 Miles to Boa Vista
25 November 2017 | 265 Miles to Boa Vista
Recent Blog Posts
22 April 2018 | FIC Jetty, Stanley

Random Notes

4:00pm Sunday 22nd April 2018 ( UTC-3 ) Please bear with me on my comments on Stanley and the Falklands as I am by no means an authority and what follows must be taken as the impressions of an occasional visitor. It has been my great good fortune to become well acquainted with Bob, Janet, Jason and Andrez, all Kelpers and all with a slightly different outlook on their surroundings and circumstances but all with the common thought that this is a great place to be; indeed this also applies to the many other people with whom I have had the pleasure of conversing. As I have mentioned before Barbara and I spent six months here 42 years ago and even then there was much talk about the potential for fishing and oil but hanging over all this was the stated threat of an Argentine takeover of the Islands and this was also a time when Britain, subsequent to WW2, had already divested itself of most of its Colonies and Empire. Because of this the Colony was very much dependent for income on practically its sole industry, wool, and the vagaries of that market. The turning point of course was the Argentine invasion in 1982 and the decision of Margaret Thatcher and her Government that this naked aggression should not go unanswered. With great heroism and at substantial loss of life to themselves the Brits overcame a more numerous well dug in foe to free the Islands from that malignant dictatorship and equally as important asserted to the world that The Falklands, now an Overseas Territory of the UK, was open for business. Substantial investment res ulted in the discovery and proving of economic quantities of oil which could proceed to production at any time but the mainstay of the economy is fishing along with tourism and wool. Careful scientific management of the fishery involving trawling for one type of squid, jigging for another type, longlining for Patagonian Toothfish and " Hoovering " for Krill has been of huge benefit to the Islands and its population and yet without any apparent downside that often occurs in such circumstances to either the people or the wildlife. Nearly 60 tourist ships visit the Islands each year carrying up to 3,000 passengers each so providing buses and tour guides for penguin and seal watching as well as cafes and souvenir shops ensure many employment opportunities. The large military bases at Mount Pleasant and Mare Harbour, though largely self contained, have positive flow on effects in the community. There are no natural trees on the Falklands though interestingly enough further South where I holed up for a while in Puerto Espanol on the Island of Tierra del Fuego fixing the rigging substantial forests were located in every fold in the land and the beaches were strewn with bleached driftwood. A few types of trees planted around Stanley and the one settlement I have been to, Port San Carlos, seem to thrive but there are absolutely none in " The Camp ". Again, not being a naturalist or a grazier, the vegetation is very low to the ground and a lot of it seeming wiry or clumped together but nevertheless is capable of supporting the former population of 650,000 sheep together with a much smaller number of cattle and horses. I believe at the present there are now about 500,000 sheep and fewer horses as much of the former work done on horseback is now done with bikes, quad bikes and Land Rovers. There are vast areas of peat bogs which formerly was the main cooking and heating f uel on the Islands, including Stanley, but is now supplanted by electricity for cooking and kerosene for central heating. As such the country can be boggy for travelling and not suitable for cropping so though appearing barren is however productive. In addition to the sheep there are large numbers of the Upland Goose which are very good to eat and almost in pest proportions as they compete with the sheep for available pasture. I still avidly read the comments on my blog which brings me to my former yacht Katherine Ann. Yes she has the identical hull shape to the Mottle 33 though this was an early creation of the Joe Adams design made by laying up C- Flex fibreglass battens on frames and building up the substantial hull thickness with additional glass and resin. The deck cockpit cabin and interior fit out is plywood and varnished wood giving a very attractive traditional appearance and she served me well in the 20,000 odd miles I did in her. I spent about 200 days solo at sea in Katherine Ann and in L'Eau Commotion about 270 days, the longest stretch being 218 days from Southport to Stanley via the Canaries and passing by Cape Horn four times. At various times I also enjoyed the company of Simon ( sadly missed ) Kerrie, Tom and my daughter KT and grandson Constantine between Cairns, Brisbane, Lord Howe Island, Sydney and Hobart for another three or four weeks at sea in both yachts. Yesterday, 21st April, was the actual birthday of Queen Elizabeth the Second, and was celebrated in fine style with a military parade, in front of Stanley House of the British Army,Navy and Air Force and a contingent of the Falkland Islands Defence Force, led by a stirring marching band of The Ghurkas, with the Governor presiding and taking the 21 gun salute from two venerable Hotchkiss Mountain Guns. In a recent referendum asking should they remain an Overseas Territory of the Crown 99.7% of the people who voted said yes. The three naysayers did not make their presence felt at the ceremony.

21 April 2018 | Stanley, Falkland Islands

Demasted

Jason and the launch crew lifted the mast out of L'Eau Commotion with consummate ease. Here it is on the FIC Jetty with Katherine Ann moored alongside.

18 April 2018 | Stanley, Falkland Islands

Katherine Ann & L'Eau Commotion

Here is a shot of Katherine Ann and L'Eau Commotion taken at the FIC Jetty this morning. For those not familiar with my past attempts I sailed Katherine Ann into Stanley Harbour two years ago after capsizing and sustaining some some damage SW of Cape Horn. I sold her to Jason who is in the process of [...]

13 April 2018 | The Camber, Stanley Harbour, Falkland Islands

Getting It Together

7.00pm Friday 13th April 2018 ( UTC-3 )

30 March 2018 | FIC Jetty, Stanley

Equipment

6:00pm Good Friday, 30th March 2018 ( UTC-3 ) Everything that I consider essential to get me back to Southport with a modicum of safety has been ordered and on its way. For electrical power a Watt & Sea Hydrogenerator should arrive shortly. I decided that solar panels were too prone to be wiped out by waves to replace them and just don't have the clear deck space to fit them flat. Again I am not installing a wind generator for the same reason as the blades are susceptible to breakage and occasionally when the wind increases rapidly sometimes the auto braking is slow to stop the very high rotational speed which is rather scary if you have to be working underneath them. I have a small 20 watt solar panel on top of the little dodger over the companionway hatch which keeps the main engine starting battery always nicely topped up and thus can use the engine driven alternator for backup power; in addition I have a stowed 80 watt solar panel I can rig in calm conditions. I intend to install an Echomax active radar enhancer which lights up and sends back a powerful pulse whenever painted by a ships radar. The Raymarine tiller pilot is back in action. It was a dual failure with a corroded wire to the clutch mechanism combined with corrosion in the electronic backbone cable. I will be able to take the mast out here at the FIC Jetty to check the rigging and replace the faulty parts, install a Tricolour masthead light and by replacing the Raymarine wind cable I hope to have the windspeed and direction instrument back in operation. The replacement element for the Katadyn e40 desalinator is also on its way, but of course I still have the manual model 35. Andrez Short, a Kelper with a vast amount of sailing experience out of the Falklands to the North Atlantic as far North as Norway has been wonderful in assisting to get the equipment here as well as fixing the staysail furling mechanism which should be a real boon in heavy weather. Bob McLeod checked out the VHF which seems to be good as I will have a spare to my favourite brand acquired from Andrez, an Icom VHF. I spent an afternoon and then a full day in the museum. The exhibits and accompanying explanations are truly of world class and are housed in buildings dating back to the time of the establishment of the colony in Stanley in the 1840's. The Conflict, the invasion by Argentina in 1982, features strongly in the narrative and brought about huge changes in the lifestyles of the population. This contrast was the more interesting as Barbara and I spent six months here in 1976 after limping in in our little yacht. It is great to yarn with Andrez about times long gone. He is a direct descendant of one of the military pensioners who volunteered to come out here in 1848 and is in the process of refurbishing one of the original cottages, which he owns, built at the same time and just few houses away from that occupied by the first Short. Back in 1976, The Colony, or in PC Speak, Overseas Territory, seemed to be struggling with quite a few failed schemes which tried to diversify the economy away from its almost complete dependence on one product - wool. The economy is now booming with the addition of a large and well managed squid and finfish industry and the likelihood of production starting up of proven oil reserves in the near future. These things were talked about 40 years ago but the threat of Argentine reprisals but a lid on any exploration.

25 March 2018 | FIC Jetty, Stanley, Falkland Islands

One Stop Shop

6:00am Sunday 25th March 2018 ( UTC-3 ) Hello John Thank you for this information. It has always been my intention to get the yacht back to a sound seaworthy condition and then sail direct back to Southport under sail alone. Quite a few people have said why don't you cruise through the South Pacific [...]

Random Notes

22 April 2018 | FIC Jetty, Stanley
4:00pm Sunday 22nd April 2018 ( UTC-3 ) Please bear with me on my comments on Stanley and the Falklands as I am by no means an authority and what follows must be taken as the impressions of an occasional visitor. It has been my great good fortune to become well acquainted with Bob, Janet, Jason and Andrez, all Kelpers and all with a slightly different outlook on their surroundings and circumstances but all with the common thought that this is a great place to be; indeed this also applies to the many other people with whom I have had the pleasure of conversing. As I have mentioned before Barbara and I spent six months here 42 years ago and even then there was much talk about the potential for fishing and oil but hanging over all this was the stated threat of an Argentine takeover of the Islands and this was also a time when Britain, subsequent to WW2, had already divested itself of most of its Colonies and Empire. Because of this the Colony was very much dependent for income on practically its sole industry, wool, and the vagaries of that market. The turning point of course was the Argentine invasion in 1982 and the decision of Margaret Thatcher and her Government that this naked aggression should not go unanswered. With great heroism and at substantial loss of life to themselves the Brits overcame a more numerous well dug in foe to free the Islands from that malignant dictatorship and equally as important asserted to the world that The Falklands, now an Overseas Territory of the UK, was open for business. Substantial investment res ulted in the discovery and proving of economic quantities of oil which could proceed to production at any time but the mainstay of the economy is fishing along with tourism and wool. Careful scientific management of the fishery involving trawling for one type of squid, jigging for another type, longlining for Patagonian Toothfish and " Hoovering " for Krill has been of huge benefit to the Islands and its population and yet without any apparent downside that often occurs in such circumstances to either the people or the wildlife. Nearly 60 tourist ships visit the Islands each year carrying up to 3,000 passengers each so providing buses and tour guides for penguin and seal watching as well as cafes and souvenir shops ensure many employment opportunities. The large military bases at Mount Pleasant and Mare Harbour, though largely self contained, have positive flow on effects in the community. There are no natural trees on the Falklands though interestingly enough further South where I holed up for a while in Puerto Espanol on the Island of Tierra del Fuego fixing the rigging substantial forests were located in every fold in the land and the beaches were strewn with bleached driftwood. A few types of trees planted around Stanley and the one settlement I have been to, Port San Carlos, seem to thrive but there are absolutely none in " The Camp ". Again, not being a naturalist or a grazier, the vegetation is very low to the ground and a lot of it seeming wiry or clumped together but nevertheless is capable of supporting the former population of 650,000 sheep together with a much smaller number of cattle and horses. I believe at the present there are now about 500,000 sheep and fewer horses as much of the former work done on horseback is now done with bikes, quad bikes and Land Rovers. There are vast areas of peat bogs which formerly was the main cooking and heating f uel on the Islands, including Stanley, but is now supplanted by electricity for cooking and kerosene for central heating. As such the country can be boggy for travelling and not suitable for cropping so though appearing barren is however productive. In addition to the sheep there are large numbers of the Upland Goose which are very good to eat and almost in pest proportions as they compete with the sheep for available pasture. I still avidly read the comments on my blog which brings me to my former yacht Katherine Ann. Yes she has the identical hull shape to the Mottle 33 though this was an early creation of the Joe Adams design made by laying up C- Flex fibreglass battens on frames and building up the substantial hull thickness with additional glass and resin. The deck cockpit cabin and interior fit out is plywood and varnished wood giving a very attractive traditional appearance and she served me well in the 20,000 odd miles I did in her. I spent about 200 days solo at sea in Katherine Ann and in L'Eau Commotion about 270 days, the longest stretch being 218 days from Southport to Stanley via the Canaries and passing by Cape Horn four times. At various times I also enjoyed the company of Simon ( sadly missed ) Kerrie, Tom and my daughter KT and grandson Constantine between Cairns, Brisbane, Lord Howe Island, Sydney and Hobart for another three or four weeks at sea in both yachts. Yesterday, 21st April, was the actual birthday of Queen Elizabeth the Second, and was celebrated in fine style with a military parade, in front of Stanley House of the British Army,Navy and Air Force and a contingent of the Falkland Islands Defence Force, led by a stirring marching band of The Ghurkas, with the Governor presiding and taking the 21 gun salute from two venerable Hotchkiss Mountain Guns. In a recent referendum asking should they remain an Overseas Territory of the Crown 99.7% of the people who voted said yes. The three naysayers did not make their presence felt at the ceremony.

Demasted

21 April 2018 | Stanley, Falkland Islands
Jason and the launch crew lifted the mast out of L'Eau Commotion with consummate ease. Here it is on the FIC Jetty with Katherine Ann moored alongside.

Katherine Ann & L'Eau Commotion

18 April 2018 | Stanley, Falkland Islands
Here is a shot of Katherine Ann and L'Eau Commotion taken at the FIC Jetty this morning. For those not familiar with my past attempts I sailed Katherine Ann into Stanley Harbour two years ago after capsizing and sustaining some some damage SW of Cape Horn. I sold her to Jason who is in the process of bringing her up to a seaworthy condition again.
Repairs to L'Eau Commotion are proceeding apace with the installation of the Watt & Sea hydrogenerator and the commissioning of the Echomax Radar Enhancer which is working as per specs. I am still waiting on the rigging parts which are in Santiago Chile waiting for load capacity on the weekly flight in.

Getting It Together

13 April 2018 | The Camber, Stanley Harbour, Falkland Islands
7.00pm Friday 13th April 2018 ( UTC-3 )

It's not over yet but on a day when every old salt is on his guard and of course adamant that no rash undertakings, such as leaving port, are even considered, everything has run along smoothly. The state of play. I have the Onwa chart plotter transmitting and receiving AIS data which is a great comfort. There are literally hundreds of fishing vessels - squid jiggers, long liners and trawlers within a hundred miles of Stanley and they are Big. 75 to 80 metres is the norm and to give you an idea of the size they will unload 2000 tonnes of frozen fish at a time to the waiting freezer ships anchored in Stanley's outer harbour, Port William. These vessels often have lots of bright working lights so small vessels just cannot be seen through the glare and the AIS can show both the fisher and the sailer each other's position. The Echomax X radar enhancer is here and all the fittings and switches have been procured ( a polite way of saying begged borrowed or stolen ) . The task of fitting and wiring should take a competent electrical fitter two hours so I will be most pleased if I can get it done in a day. The Watt & Sea turbogenerator likewise is here and the support blocks bolts and fuses are all to hand. Typically a nice easy paced Facebook video would show the task finished in five minutes so I'm hoping to get that done in a day also. I have shifted over to the North side of Stanley Harbour to The Camber which is the enclosed harbour formerly used by the British Navy as a coaling station. It is fully protected from winds from any direction and was quite comfortable in 60+ knot gusts last week. It also has a small marina style dock which will be useful to fit the hydrogenerator on the transom. On the trip of less than a mile the autopilot was engaged and seems to be working smoothly. I'm hoping to have the rigging fittings here by Monday and the mast out next week to check the wiring and install a good LED tricolour mast head light, so if all goes to plan I should be on my way to Southport within the fortnight. The weather here of course is varied. Yesterday strong winds rain and hailstorms. Today all sunshine and gentle breezes so a great day to walk around this picturesque town shopping for gear, chatting to people you meet along the way and dropping in to Bob and Janet for a cup of coffee and coming away with a cabbage and a perfect brand new drop in replacement for a rather sus distribution panel; to Andrez for some home baked bread and beautifully roasted leg of mutton sandwiches for lunch and finish making and drilling the Hydrogenerator supports, to the FIC West store for really good value and tasty mutton mince and beef sausages to go with Janet's spuds and kale; and a gentle motor across the dead still Stanley Harbour to spend the weekend away from the hustle and bustle. LG. Life's Good.

Equipment

30 March 2018 | FIC Jetty, Stanley
6:00pm Good Friday, 30th March 2018 ( UTC-3 ) Everything that I consider essential to get me back to Southport with a modicum of safety has been ordered and on its way. For electrical power a Watt & Sea Hydrogenerator should arrive shortly. I decided that solar panels were too prone to be wiped out by waves to replace them and just don't have the clear deck space to fit them flat. Again I am not installing a wind generator for the same reason as the blades are susceptible to breakage and occasionally when the wind increases rapidly sometimes the auto braking is slow to stop the very high rotational speed which is rather scary if you have to be working underneath them. I have a small 20 watt solar panel on top of the little dodger over the companionway hatch which keeps the main engine starting battery always nicely topped up and thus can use the engine driven alternator for backup power; in addition I have a stowed 80 watt solar panel I can rig in calm conditions. I intend to install an Echomax active radar enhancer which lights up and sends back a powerful pulse whenever painted by a ships radar. The Raymarine tiller pilot is back in action. It was a dual failure with a corroded wire to the clutch mechanism combined with corrosion in the electronic backbone cable. I will be able to take the mast out here at the FIC Jetty to check the rigging and replace the faulty parts, install a Tricolour masthead light and by replacing the Raymarine wind cable I hope to have the windspeed and direction instrument back in operation. The replacement element for the Katadyn e40 desalinator is also on its way, but of course I still have the manual model 35. Andrez Short, a Kelper with a vast amount of sailing experience out of the Falklands to the North Atlantic as far North as Norway has been wonderful in assisting to get the equipment here as well as fixing the staysail furling mechanism which should be a real boon in heavy weather. Bob McLeod checked out the VHF which seems to be good as I will have a spare to my favourite brand acquired from Andrez, an Icom VHF. I spent an afternoon and then a full day in the museum. The exhibits and accompanying explanations are truly of world class and are housed in buildings dating back to the time of the establishment of the colony in Stanley in the 1840's. The Conflict, the invasion by Argentina in 1982, features strongly in the narrative and brought about huge changes in the lifestyles of the population. This contrast was the more interesting as Barbara and I spent six months here in 1976 after limping in in our little yacht. It is great to yarn with Andrez about times long gone. He is a direct descendant of one of the military pensioners who volunteered to come out here in 1848 and is in the process of refurbishing one of the original cottages, which he owns, built at the same time and just few houses away from that occupied by the first Short. Back in 1976, The Colony, or in PC Speak, Overseas Territory, seemed to be struggling with quite a few failed schemes which tried to diversify the economy away from its almost complete dependence on one product - wool. The economy is now booming with the addition of a large and well managed squid and finfish industry and the likelihood of production starting up of proven oil reserves in the near future. These things were talked about 40 years ago but the threat of Argentine reprisals but a lid on any exploration.

One Stop Shop

25 March 2018 | FIC Jetty, Stanley, Falkland Islands
6:00am Sunday 25th March 2018 ( UTC-3 ) Hello John Thank you for this information. It has always been my intention to get the yacht back to a sound seaworthy condition and then sail direct back to Southport under sail alone. Quite a few people have said why don't you cruise through the South Pacific Islands but I've done that and never circumnavigated so though I don't need the incentive it will be a good excuse! Communications and supply are a little more difficult here but this is more than compensated by the great advice and practical assistance I have received from so many yachtsmen resident here in the Falklands. On a different matter I was chuffed to learn that my daughter Katherine Ann with Emma yesterday won the Club Class Australian Double Sculls Championship, an event open to all comers except those who are seeking International selection. She has also been selected in the Queensland Interstate Veterans Eight so I am understandably very proud of her for continuing a family tradition. Regards Bill

-----Original Message----- From: SailBlogs <autopilot@sailblogs.com> Sent: Sun, 25 Mar 2018 05:11:55 -0300 Subject: SailBlogs: John Brooks left a comment on your SailBlog

The following comment was left on your SailBlog:

John Brooks (jlesliebrooks@gmail.com) says:

Hi Bill, Hope you are well and that things are proceeding OK for you in the Falklands. I realise things are a bit different this time around in that you will have a serviceable craft once more when repairs are complete unlike last time when all you could do was sell up and move on. So, I am just checking to see what your plans are and if you realise that, if you continue around the Horn and if you succeed in getting home OK, you will be eligible for a Performance Certificate for a circumnavigation with one stop, thereby getting into the record books? Not as good as the big first-west-about-non-stop I know, but better than nothing for all your efforts. Cheers John

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L'Eau Commotion's Photos - Main
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