Little Green Boat

Spruce visited Japan and Alaska in 2018 after time spent in the South Pacific, NZ, Australia and Asia.

30 January 2020 | Mazatlan - Sonora - Mexico
30 January 2020
30 January 2020 | San Blas - Nayarit - Mexico
30 January 2020
30 January 2020
30 January 2020 | La Cruz de la Huanacaxtle - Nayarit - Mexico
30 January 2020
30 January 2020
04 January 2020 | Creel - Chihuahua - Mexico
04 January 2020
04 January 2020
02 January 2020 | Batopilas - Chihuahua - Mexico
02 January 2020
02 January 2020
02 January 2020
02 January 2020
01 January 2020 | Creel - Chihuahua - Mexico
01 January 2020
01 January 2020
30 December 2019 | Creel - Chihuahua - Mexico

South to Banderas Bay

30 January 2020 | Mazatlan - Sonora - Mexico
Sue & Andy Warman
The sail south from Topolobampo started in a breeze gusting to 25-knots. Fortunately, after leaving the river mouth we turned downwind and a fast delightful sail was our lot. It took some 36-hours to cover the 220-miles to near Mazatlan, the wind held for most of the journey and, apart from getting out of the river initially, we only motored for three hours. Entering the anchorage behind a rocky islet was a little nerve wracking, it always is in the dark. The following day we picked our way into the outer harbour anchoring zone at Mazatlan.
The photo shows Sue at the summit of the hike to the lighthouse that overlooks the harbour.

30 January 2020
Sue & Andy Warman
he old town of Mazatlan is well worth a visit. More examples of Spanish colonial architecture in the cathedral and many other buildings. Often places one visits have been wrecked introducing modernity, here in Old Mazatlan town planners have done a good job of preserving the best. Contractors are still engaged in modernising dilapidated properties while retaining the period exterior fa├žades intact.

30 January 2020 | San Blas - Nayarit - Mexico
Sue & Andy Warman
Another overnight sail took us south to Bahia Matanchen, near the picturesque town of San Blas, a short taxi ride away. Canadian friends who visited two-years ago regaled tales of a pretty bay with a couple of beach side palapas (straw roofed cafes) and a cinder-block tiende (shop). We found the shop to be derelict and the whole beach front filled with large straw roofed restaurants. We arrived at the weekend to a busy scene; many folks on the beach and two pangas (seemingly converted fishing launches) towing blown up cylinders crowded with happy yelling visitors. The development of this region clearly is moving at a fast pace. On Monday almost no visitors were seen. We walked along the track behind the rather large palapas looking for a taxi into town. Energetic waiters forlornly attempted to lure us into their empty establishments.

30 January 2020
Sue & Andy Warman
San Blas itself was an interesting town. Again much of the old has been retained and small businesses proliferate in between.

30 January 2020
Sue & Andy Warman
The town square is dominated by the new church and the original one, from the eighteenth century beside. Although, the older edifice is in urgent need of some attention if it is to remain standing. Cobbled streets are plentiful, also in need of repair. Teetering along uneven cobbles reminds us why they have been replaced by modern road surfaces. San Blas has equal potential to become as much of a tourist destination as better known Mazatlan to the north.

30 January 2020 | La Cruz de la Huanacaxtle - Nayarit - Mexico
Sue & Andy Warman
A day-sail, or rather a day-motor, brought us another 50-miles south into the larger Bahia Banderas. During the winter, northerly winds continue to blow out of the Sea of Cortez. At the sheltered north side of this bay the town of La Cruz de la Huanacaxtle, a yachting mecca, is situated. There is a marina but around 30-50 yachts anchor out. A large contingent of US and Canadian vessels appear to be based here all year round. On the less sheltered side of the bay, near Puerto Vallarta, a few other marinas are located. Parts and services are available at La Cruz to a limited level. The largest chandlery is 30km away in Puerto Vallarta, the nearest sizeable supermarket is at Bucerias, 8km distant. There are buses, Uber and regular taxis, but this is not the easiest place to prepare a boat for long voyages.
The north east pacific contingent of boats aiming on sailing to the South Pacific typically depart from here. We remember a similar scene at Shelter Bay Marina in Panama during late 2012. There it was mainly sailboats from Europe, here almost all are from the USA or Canada. We appear to be the only British yacht, we briefly saw one with an Austrian flag.
Banderas Bay has large colonies of hump back whales. A mother, calf and guard whale frequently splash around the anchorage, sometimes in only 4m depth of water. They seem quite adept as avoiding boats and their anchor chains.
Vessel Name: Spruce
Vessel Make/Model: Hallberg Rassy 42 - Enderlein Design
Hailing Port: Portsmouth, UK
Crew: Sue & Andy
About: Sue is an artist, plays the flute and guitar. Andy enjoys technical challenges and hoped to learn to speak more Spanish. Unsuccessfully:-( Maybe this year?
Extra: During 2013 and 2014 we sailed across the Pacific to New Zealand and then Australia. 2015-18 brought us from Asia to Washington State via the Noorth pacific Rim. In 2019 we aim to cruise BC and then head south to Mexico.
Home Page: http://www.sailblogs.com/member/littlegreenboat
Social:
Spruce's Photos - Tuamotus 2
Photo 29 of 33 | Back To Album
Prev   Next
Added 30 June 2013