MangoandMe

14 December 2012
30 June 2012 | ASCENSION ISLAND
30 June 2012 | ASCENSION ISLAND
04 June 2012
28 May 2012 | St Helena, South Atlantic Ocean
28 May 2012 | St Helena, South Atlantic Ocean
25 May 2012 | Riviera Beach, Florida
23 May 2012 | Riviera Marina, Riviera Beach FL
23 May 2012 | Riviera Beach Marina, Riviera Beach, Florida
19 May 2012 | En route to Riviera Beach, Florida
18 May 2012 | En route to Riviera Beach, Florida
17 May 2012 | En route to Riviera Beach, Florida
16 May 2012 | En route to Riviera Beach, Florida
15 May 2012 | En route to Riviera Beach, Florida
14 May 2012 | En route to Florida
13 May 2012 | Destination:Riviera Beach Marina, Riviera Beach, Florida
12 May 2012 | Destination:Florida
11 May 2012 | On the way to the Caribbean

STOPPING SHEARWATER!

08 July 2010 | Entrance to Papeete Harbor, Tahiti
david
No sooner than we left the lee of Rangiroa in the Tuamotos, the seas and wind completely negated ALL weather reports(except my friend, Clyde:'get in by Thursday'). Before we knew what happened, we were in 25 knot winds and rough seas. We were taking it all on the beam - on this tack we felt the full force of the wind as opposed to racing before the wind where ones boat speed is subtracted from the wind speed. We battled through this caldron in the dense black of night, all night. Banging Shearwater hard ... water everywhere - enormous waves covering her every few minutes.

Morning came and as the light revealed this ocean and its angry face, it became evident that we faced now the challenge of stopping Shearwater before the Tahiti Harbor entrance which, coincidentally was exactly on the same course - 200 degrees. The seas now had built even more, frothing at their highest points. A few particularly big waves from the side would slam Shearwater and for but a few moments she would seem to stagger sideways, stunned in her tracks, then shake it off as a boxer shakes of a stunning blow.

As the winds now built to sustained 30 gusting 35, the problem became...how to get the sails down for I feared damage due to the violent luffing that would take place the moment of heading into wind.

Where was their a quieter sea? Was there a lee somewhere?

I made a few calls on the radio as to knowledge of the entrance and to whether any shielding from the wind. No response.

Land was closing in. Examining the chart and picking a spot further up the coast, a small little bay, I was hoping that there... there might be some small respite from this onslaught, enough to get those sails down.

I hated to be be rushing directly to shore in this search.... now only half mile off... Shearwater unchanged but reaching 15 knots sporadically... hunting for less wind and realizing that if anything went wrong we were now very close to land. A myriad of emotions ...amazement, anger, frustration, fear and cursing the gods!....plied those fleeting moments.

Engines on.

I studied the windspeed indicator and made the decision that as soon as I saw a '19 knot' I would instantly head her into wind.

I riveted my eyes on the readout....25......24......30......32......closer and closer to shore, waves still pounding our side.....27....24......22....and then......18 knots!.... we turned the rudders hard and gunned the engines into wind....rushed to the front, let the halyards go and wrestled the dacron monsters to the ground, tied them up....and... we were done.

We now could enter the harbor as calmly as ever, as though nothing at all had happened and, as I called Harbor Control for permission to enter.....I smiled at my now apparent coolness.
Comments
Vessel Name: Shearwater
Vessel Make/Model: CONSER 47 Racer/Cruiser Catamaran
Hailing Port: West Palm Beach Florida
Crew: MANGO AND ME
About:
Mango is a smart, funny, sensitive and totally unique wheaton/sheepdog. . He is my partner on this patently undoglike voyage but remains cheerful about the whole affair. [...]
Extra: Shearwater is a 47 foot, very sleek and light catamaran. She is part of a fleet of 11 that were built - its a sister ship of Shearwater that holds the unofficial speed record. 31 knots! Of the this fleet, only one has flipped...so we are on the side of good odds!
Shearwater's Photos - Main
Lesley, Kelly, John, Karol and David successfully transit the canal....a few misc shots
27 Photos
Created 13 March 2010
2 Photos
Created 12 June 2009

Who: MANGO AND ME
Port: West Palm Beach Florida