Voyage East from Rhode Island

Crossing the Atlantic Ocean on Runaway Bunny

Vessel Name: Runaway Bunny
Vessel Make/Model: Sloop
Crew: Crew: Eran, Rob, Joy, Charlie, Tristan, Juan.
About: Captain: Eran Gindi
16 November 2013 | Mallorca
13 November 2013 | Atlantic Ocean
06 November 2013 | 37deg42.4N 16deg16.2W
02 November 2013 | Azores
02 November 2013
30 October 2013
27 October 2013 | 35º42.932n 49º02.522w
26 October 2013 | Atlantic Ocean
26 October 2013
26 October 2013
26 October 2013 | North Atlantic
24 October 2013 | North Atlantic
24 October 2013 | North Atlantic
23 October 2013
23 October 2013
22 October 2013 | Bermuda
20 October 2013 | Bermuda
19 October 2013 | North Atlantic
19 October 2013
Recent Blog Posts
16 November 2013 | Mallorca

An ocean crossed

Tristan's final blog log

13 November 2013 | Atlantic Ocean

Tristan at the helm

Happy sailor on Runaway Bunny!

06 November 2013 | 37deg42.4N 16deg16.2W

The apples of my eye.

Tristan's blog log 7

02 November 2013 | Azores

Azores demons lost in translation

Tristan's blog log 6

An ocean crossed

16 November 2013 | Mallorca
Tristan
Tristan's final blog log
Palma, Mallorca.



So, after sailing on through med straits, dodging huge ships, and as you do, the occasional submarine ...


... we headed north up the Spanish coast and then out for Mallorca.


There have been plenty of opportunities to confront and overcome challenges, like my fear of heights ...



... and mild navigational disagreements ...


We had stopped in Gibraltar for just an hour to refuel, and we were all pretty excited to see land.
Africa on one side, Spain on the other.


However, we were all a little bummed to have to leave without stepping on shore knowing that it would be another three days before making Mallorca. So close, but feels like still such a long time to go. It seems that the closer you get to the end, the longer it takes!

We were a day off Mallorca and the forecasters were telling us of very bad weather closing in. The last night sailing was spent sailing through strong 30kt winds, and a lot of tiredness. We were all unashamedly fed up at that stage. Luckily though, we managed to miss the worst of the storm. We had an anxious listen to the aftermath on the boat's radio the next day, as a motor boat 100 miles north of us was sending out maydays. Unfortunately, we were too far to help, but very glad to hear the coastguard come over the radio and fly to the rescue.

Plowing on through the high winds we made great time, putting the hammer down and opening out as much sail as possible whenever we could.

We eventually sailed into port at 4pm on Monday.


The next couple of hours were spent washing and cleaning both inside and out on the boat. We all then went our separate ways for the evening.

I got to chat to my family, which was great, if that bit harder knowing that the trip is finished but I'm not there just yet. My prearranged flight times meant I'd have an agonising wait. However, I managed to change flights, and I am now heading back home at last to my two boys arms and lives.

It has not sunk in yet, the journey I have completed. Over 4500 miles at sea. 5 weeks living on a boat - a temporary home that never stays still.

Folks, that's 5 weeks of sleeping in a moving bed. It's 5 weeks of no shaving. It's 5 weeks with only a handful of showers. Moreover, ladies and gentlemen, it is 5 weeks of having to pee sitting down because standing in the forward bathroom trying to do so at sea would mean cleaning the walls and roof every time! I won't miss all that.

I will miss though the amazing sense of humility to the ocean ...


and the incredible sky's when sailing through the night ...


and the sunsets and sunrises that last for only a few minutes ...



and gifts from the ocean ...


and, I will really miss the boys on the boat: Juan, Eran and Rob - amazing company.


It was an incredible journey, and I have my loved ones to thank for persuading and helping me to do it.

I may be broke at present, but to have such help and support to achieve my dream of crossing an ocean ... I feel like a very rich man indeed.

Until the next journey,

T on the sea

Tristan at the helm

13 November 2013 | Atlantic Ocean
Happy sailor on Runaway Bunny!

The apples of my eye.

06 November 2013 | 37deg42.4N 16deg16.2W
Tristan
Tristan's blog log 7

37deg42.4N 16deg16.2W
Bar 1012
Log 3302
speed 11.3
course 103deg



We left the island of Faial in the Azores at 1500hrs on Sunday in no wind. Consequently, we have been motoring since. We were stuck under a High pressure and were not able to break out. It was enough to dampen anybody's spirit, especially mine ... :-)


Last night however the winds came in again just forward of the beam. Since then we've been averaging 10knots under sail. As a result, everybody is happier and in much better form. Motoring for a few days begins to take its toll; there's no rhythm to the boat, and you end up feeling very woosie. Also, the constant din and vibration of the engine just leaves your stomach unsettled.



The winds are supposed to hold for the rest of today, and then die out by tomorrow. We are happy though, because, as it was, we would have been a day off Gibraltar when we'd have run out of fuel. Now we should get there, stop for and hour to refuel, and get going again.




Juan appears to have supernatural powers.


He was on the money predicting our date of arrival in Bermuda, and then again in Faial. He has now announced that we should make the straights by Saturday afternoon, and Mallorca by Wednesday or Thursday. We'll see!

On Monday we got to follow a whale for a half hour. Amazing stuff. Nobody knows what type of whale it was though. It was about 40 long with a very flat head. Dark in colour and just cruising along the surface.

Your guess?

We have also had the company of many more dolphins. They don't stay with us for too long though - I guess it's down to us all not showering very often. Our showers are a bit more rationed now as we have to conserve fuel where we can. It's quite a reasonable excuse, nes't-ce pas?


I received some beautiful words today about Harry, one of my sons. In the last year, he has started to 'make believe'. He is three. His mother was walking with him and his younger brother Hugo in the park. As he went in through a group of trees, to make tea for himself, his mom followed him, and seeing him looking skywards, asked him what was up there. He told her that there was an apple tree, and pointed it out to her. It had lots of apples on it. She then asked if she could have one, to which he promptly replied - No! He explained why not. They were too high, and only Daddy could take them down!

Words can be very special at night on the sea.

That's it for another few days,
T on the sea.

Azores demons lost in translation

02 November 2013 | Azores
Tristan
Tristan's blog log 6
Azores Islands

Since my last post we have arrived in the little town of Horta - very pretty. We're the largest boat in the marina, so we are getting a few looks!


We had some difficult sailing the last few days, with winds shifting on us a lot. They got up to 35 knots gusting, with rather big seas.

This yacht can fairly shift along - ten years ago it reached a speed of over 16 knots. Until yesterday, Eran had the speed record trip of 14.7 knots for this trip, which is pretty god damn fast. However, I managed to smash that with 15.1 knots, so I'm feeling rather proud of myself! 


We arrived into the port in mist and rain, which wasn't very pleasant.


Then we spent the morning cleaning the boat inside and out.

Eventually, the rain dried up around lunch time, and we hung out all our wet gear to dry. We sent all our laundry off for cleaning - quite a lot at this stage, and then we all had showers, and felt clean and fresh for the first time in a good while! 





We have today off, and have all gone our seperate ways. Having been cooped up for a fortnight, space from everyone else is much needed at this stage.

We'll be setting sail again tomorrow morning for Palma Mallorca. Even after such a trek across the ocean we are only half way through the journey as it another 2000 odd miles to go!! So, depending on the weather, it will be another 10/15 days at sea!

When we go on watch we have to fill out the log with our coordinates, details of the weather, and systems check on the boat. At night, the captain may leave watch orders, such as, if the wind gets above such and such - give him a call, or if the wind goes below or above whatever degree - give him a shout.

The other night I was on the helm, and Juan did the log. He then came up and sat beside me. It was a very dark night. You couldn't really see the sea, but it was very lumpy, and there was a good breeze howling through the rigging. Quite an eerie atmosphere. I asked Juan if there were there any orders. He said there were, and told me that we were to tell Eran if the angle of the wind were to go above 130, or if the boat speed were to drop below 5kts. Then, he said we were also instructed to notify the captain immediately if a 'Man Fish' were to come out of the water. I froze. I'd never even heard of this creature.

I had a second or two of utter terror with the childlike fear of the unknown monster appearing out of the black black sea and stepping unto the boat.

Juan's English is very good, but sometimes he mixes things up. Much to my immense relief it turned out he was talking about a Mermaid. I can't say my underwear were the better for that experience! 

I am off now to do some walking and exploring.

T on the sea
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