04 August 2021 | 17 32.383'S:149 34.232'W, Papeete Marina, Tahiti, French Polynesia
03 August 2021 | 16 35.765'S:148 31.906'W, At Sea, French Polynesia
02 August 2021 | 15 04.691'S:146 50.444'W, At Sea, French Polynesia
01 August 2021 | 13 26.365'S:145 00.927'W, At Sea, French Polynesia
31 July 2021 | 11 57.570'S:143 22.215'W, At Sea, French Polynesia
30 July 2021 | 10 20.271'S:141 36.000'W, At Sea, French Polynesia
25 July 2021 | 08 55.038'S:140 05.994'W, Nuku Hiva , Marquesas
17 July 2021 | 08 55.038'S:140 05.994'W, Nuku Hiva , Marquesas
11 July 2021 | 08 55.038'S:140 05.994'W, Nuku Hiva , Marquesas
10 July 2021 | 08 55.038'S:140 05.994'W, Nuku Hiva , Marquesas
08 July 2021 | 08 55.038'S:140 05.994'W, Nuku Hiva , Marquesas
06 July 2021 | 08 55.038'S:140 05.994'W, Nuku Hiva , Marquesas
02 July 2021 | 08 55.038'S:140 05.994'W, Nuku Hiva , Marquesas
01 July 2021 | 08 55.038'S:140 05.994'W, Nuku Hiva , Marquesas
30 June 2021 | 08 55.038'S:140 05.994'W, Nuku Hiva , Marquesas
27 June 2021 | 08 55.038'S:140 05.994'W, Nuku Hiva , Marquesas
26 June 2021 | 08 55.038'S:140 05.994'W, Nuku Hiva , Marquesas
25 June 2021 | 08 55.038'S:140 05.994'W, Nuku Hiva , Marquesas
24 June 2021 | 08 55.038'S:140 05.994'W, Nuku Hiva , Marquesas
23 June 2021 | 08 55.038'S:140 05.994'W, Nuku Hiva , Marquesas

Day 18, lets start goose winging

09 June 2021 | 04 53.353'S:111 51.748'W, At sea to Nuku Hiva
NC
9th June

04 53.353 S

111 51.748 W



Weather; cloudy, wind 10 - 20 knots, waves 2 - 3 metres



The sun finally managed to peep through the clouds at around midday and with it the wind died away somewhat. The clouds began to clear from the sky and by mid-afternoon we had a lovely sunny couple of hours where we weren't being bounced all over the place and were continuing along at around 6 knots. I have to say that lethargy has well and truly found its home at the moment, neither of us can be bothered to do anything that we don't have to do. Reading is almost too much effort, "I spy" is worn to a mere thread and "guess that tune" takes far too much energy to play. Normal card and board games are out of the question as the bits would be flying all over the cockpit so that leaves us with staring at the water as it rushes by or slaps us broadside on. I hate to say it but even meal times are more hassle than it's worth but we know that we have to eat or we would fade away to nothing (as if!) We wondered aloud what meals other people have when they are on a long and bumpy p
assage, it strikes us that the easiest things are ready made stews, curries and hot pots that just need zapping for a couple of minutes at the appropriate time, eaten out of bowls, with a spoon (plates are really not an option as everything slides off them and knives are just asking for trouble!) We would be really interested to know any quick and simple menu items that we could add in that don't take long to prepare, are simple to throw together and above all are tasty. Talking of tasty, if I ever get offered a muesli bar for breakfast after this trip I think the offending person will be counting the stars swirling around their heads. Anyway back to yesterday, the afternoon slipped quietly away with Gerry having his nana nap and me doing nothing on watch. After dinner and the sun setting behind the building line of cloud our night watches started as per usual with me going first and then Gerry following. At around 1.30 am, when he came up to change over watches, the wind h
ad shifted a fair bit and I had changed our course a couple of times but the sails were still back winding and crashing about, we were still doing around 6 knots but it was getting increasingly noisier and difficult to maintain full sails. Gerry made an executive decision to furl away the staysail followed by the jib and then to try goose winging the jib and the main. Sounds like a simple solution but remember it is pitch black, we couldn't see where the next wave was coming from and we are bowling along at 6 knots. The process was for Gerry to go out on deck and firstly to take down the jockey pole, stash it and then move the preventer to run to the bow. With this secure we now had to get the spinnaker pole, on the opposite side to the main, ready to fly and hold the jib out in place. Gerry was shouting directions at me to winch or loosen the various sheets and down hauls to make this happen whilst he winched at the mast . Eventually everything was lined up correctly and th
e jib was deployed and tightened down to a satisfactory level. The wind stayed to our stern and filled both the main and the jib so we had achieved what we set out to do without any sailor speak ( I think we were both too tired to bother speaking!), without anyone going overboard and without any incidents. Back in the safety of the cockpit we congratulated ourselves on a job well done in the dark and it was time for me to disappear below and try to get some sleep. For the remainder of the night we bowled along fairly comfortably at between 6 and 7 knots, the swell died away somewhat and we were able to return to our proper heading, the stars came out to play, the sky was clear of cloud but the moon was still absent. We had spent a little time yesterday discussing what the correct time is for our current location as although we have moved our clock back an hour we are finding that sun set and rise are increasingly later, I consulted the world clock on my iPad which told us th
at we will be some 4 hours behind Panama time in Nuku Hiva which means that we will need to alter our clocks over the next or so by at least 3 more hours, to that end Gerry is going to change it by an hour today which should bring sunset and rise closer to where we expect it to happen. Again there have been no sightings of anything in the last 24 hours. We have covered a further 167NM( new record!) and not run the engine in that time. So the plan for the day is to do more of nothing, catch up with some sleep as we can, and watch the miles count down to the next way point (699 NM to then followed by a further 1000 to reach Nuku Hiva Ð it can't come quickly enough).
Comments
Vessel Name: Opal of Queensland
Vessel Make/Model: Tayana 52AC
Hailing Port: Bundaberg
Crew: Nicky, Gerry and Priss
About: Motley mostly, especially the cat
Opal of Queensland's Photos - Main
14 Photos
Created 17 July 2021
65 Photos
Created 11 July 2021
41 Photos
Created 10 July 2021
33 Photos
Created 13 May 2021
49 Photos
Created 3 May 2021
59 Photos
Created 9 April 2021
34 Photos
Created 5 April 2021
9 Photos
Created 5 April 2021
68 Photos
Created 4 April 2021
21 Photos
Created 12 March 2021
26 Photos
Created 27 February 2021
plenty of broken bits and things to fix in Colombia
44 Photos
Created 25 February 2021
25 Photos
Created 13 February 2021
27 Photos
Created 13 February 2021
29 Photos
Created 13 February 2021
36 Photos
Created 13 February 2021
20 Photos
Created 13 February 2021
13 Photos
Created 5 December 2020
Wind indicator replacement
12 Photos
Created 24 November 2020
15 Photos
Created 3 November 2020
leaving Port Louis marina, travelling to Spice Island Marine yard and hauling out to do the anti fouling
60 Photos
Created 3 November 2020
10 Photos
Created 29 July 2020
20 Photos | 2 Sub-Albums
Created 5 July 2020
28 Photos
Created 26 June 2020
62 Photos
Created 20 June 2020
10 Photos
Created 4 June 2020
155 Photos
Created 4 December 2019
104 Photos
Created 4 December 2019
55 Photos | 2 Sub-Albums
Created 1 November 2019
The life and antics of Miss Priss aboard Opal
27 Photos
Created 1 November 2019

Who: Nicky, Gerry and Priss
Port: Bundaberg