Roaring Girl

The adventures of the yacht Roaring Girl wandering the seas.

12 August 2013 | Ipswich, England
17 July 2012
16 July 2012
10 July 2012
05 July 2012
03 July 2012
03 July 2012
03 July 2012
02 July 2012 | Shanghai (high up!)
02 July 2012 | Shanghai (high up!)
02 July 2012 | Shanghai (high up!)
02 July 2012
02 July 2012 | Shanghai
01 July 2012
01 July 2012 | Moganshan Lu, Shanghai

Some practicalities before leaving (including advice to cruisers)

05 July 2012
Noonsite says there is ‘a berth for foreign yachts’ under the Oriental Pearl Tower. We couldn’t see any space there, but there are a few pontoons with motor cruisers in that vicinity. There aren’t any charts (that we found) available online, and the pace of change suggests that UKHO Admiralty Chart 1601 will need careful checking. Noonsite also points to a requirement for a pilot and advance warning to the Chinese authorities, but seems to dismiss Shanghai as only a provisioning stop en route to the offshore islands. That’s a bit like saying that Rome might be convenient on the way to Sicily! Despite all the challenges, in the extremely unlikely event that we cruise the China Sea we would definitely try to spend time in central Shanghai.

We reckon you could buy or get made almost anything in Shanghai that a boat could need. There is a fascinating conglomeration of small workshops, tool shops, sources for wires, cables, clips, pumps, ties, pipes and all sorts of other things. It runs from the corner of Fujian Lu and Beijing Lu, immediately south of the Suzhou creek. We spent a long, hot hour hunting through the piles, including examining a jewellers tool shop in great detail. Sadly (for the vendors) we didn’t buy anything this trip, but space will be required on our way back to Roaring Girl.

The currency is yuan or renminbi, currently running at a realistic conversion rate of about 9.2 to GBP1. (It looks better on the screen but that’s before conversion costs.) You can buy it outside the country if, like us, you like to arrive with a little cash. You will get a better rate from ATMs in the country, and they are everywhere.

We felt Shanghai was very safe. Of course it’s a huge city, and there are poor and desperate people here. Just like London, Paris or Auckland. But we came much closer to having our bags dipped in Pisa this June than anywhere in China.

Transport around Shanghai is easy. The main centre east of the river is roughly square, and the streets run north/south and east/west in a grid pattern. The older warrens would be easy to get lost in, but we only ventured into the touristy areas, rather than some of the side streets between the grids that you can still see in parts of the city. Every street has a clear sign on all edges of every junction in both Chinese and English. The Metro is simple, bilingual and covers a lot of the city.

Mind you, the buses (allegedly only RMB2 to go anywhere) were only signed in Chinese and we chickened out of them! Taxis in central Shanghai seemed to be standardised at about RMB15, except in the rain when the price was anything the driver thought he could get away with. Getting to or from the airport seems to be a given opportunity for taxis to try and rip you off, but should cost about RMB180 from the centre of town. The maglev train costs RMB100 each and is quite hard work with big cases; if you will still want a cab from the inner station, it is probably worth getting one straight from the airport itself. (The maglev is great fun though, and travels at 300km per hour!)

Air conditioning was essential in Shanghai in July. The residents were complaining about the heat (caused by a high that seems to have taken up residence over Southern China) and humidity. If you go there at this time of year, make sure your accommodation has air conditioning.

Food is an adventure. We had both good and bad, and found the famed street food limited, especially compared to Hong Kong. You can find food not only from all over China but across the world, from America to Turkey. We were happy to point to a menu in Chinese or Korean, and see what came. If you want to know a bit more about what you’re putting into your mouth, find a restaurant with good pictures or an English menu.

The general advice is not to drink the water. It is technically potable, but is said to contain heavy metals from the river. It certainly tastes disgusting. Every corner has a shop selling bottled water. Buy the Chinese water with a white label with red characters: it is a quarter the price of Evian.
Comments
Vessel Name: Roaring Girl
Vessel Make/Model: Maxi 120
Hailing Port: Ipswich
Crew: Pip Harris and Sarah Tanburn
About: Captain Sarah and Chief Engineer/Mate Pip moved on board in 2003 and finally made the break in 2006. Roaring Girl, launched in 1977, has already been round the world once, and has a lot more seamiles than the two of us put together.
Extra: These pages aim to bring you our adventures as they happen, as well as Roaring Girl's sailing prowess. And to show off Pip's silverwork as well.
Roaring Girl's Photos - Main
Pictures of the nuraghe Santu Antine at Torralba
4 Photos
Created 4 August 2010
Gullivette working the boat
5 Photos
Created 6 July 2010
The amazing site at Filitosa with statue-menhirs carved in granite
8 Photos
Created 3 July 2010
Pictures from the sanctuary on Corsica, at A Cupulatta
7 Photos
Created 3 July 2010
The tower on the headland and the rocks of Iles Sanguinaire on the northern edge of the Golfe d'Ajaccio
5 Photos
Created 20 June 2010
The walk from Girolata to the road
6 Photos
Created 20 June 2010
Pictures of the harbour and buoyage in the Port of Girolata
3 Photos
Created 20 June 2010
The rock formations on the coast of the Scandola Nature Reserve
5 Photos
Created 20 June 2010
Pictures of the anchorage and headland at Ile Rousse
6 Photos
Created 20 June 2010
Pictures of the coast walk around the Desert des Agriates
6 Photos
Created 20 June 2010
Landmarks and views from the tip of Corsica
14 Photos
Created 25 May 2010
Pictures from the hills on the north coast of Elba - see post dated 25 May 2010.
5 Photos
Created 25 May 2010
Pictures of the small marina in the town
3 Photos
Created 25 May 2010
A description of our renewable energy generators, particularly our demountable ampair 100. See detailed post of 19 May 2010.
4 Photos
Created 20 May 2010
Pictures of our pals, particularly a feast for Bichon lovers. See post of 19 May 2010
7 Photos | 1 Sub-Album
Created 20 May 2010
Recording some of the more splendid dishes of our Itinerario Gusto, as described in the post of 19 May 2010
4 Photos
Created 20 May 2010
A large album of pictures showing some of the beauties of the island.
21 Photos
Created 20 May 2010
Pictures of the entrance to the Rade, the anchorage and the darsena. Relates to post of 19 May 2010
8 Photos
Created 20 May 2010
The old market of Rome is being abandoned to rot, while, right next door, a new one is taking shape.
4 Photos
Created 12 May 2010
Pictures from the basilica, especially the bronze doors from the ancient Senate and wonderful mosaic decorations
8 Photos
Created 12 May 2010
Pictures of passarelles (gangplanks to the lubbers!) See post of 9 May 2010
7 Photos
Created 9 May 2010
Pictures of Ostia, the seaside town of Rome. See post of 9 May 2010.
6 Photos
Created 9 May 2010
Pictures from the Capitoline Hill. See post dated 9 May 2010
6 Photos
Created 9 May 2010
The inside of the cathedral and the great piazza in front of it. See posts from 22 April 2010.
10 Photos
Created 25 April 2010
Detailed pix of the process of cleaning out the binnacle compass and filtering the oil. See post of 18 April 2010.
4 Photos
Created 23 April 2010

Who we are

Who: Pip Harris and Sarah Tanburn
Port: Ipswich