A little boat and a big ocean.

19 July 2020
18 September 2015 | Beaulieu River, UK 50’27.32N 2’32.09W – Hayling Yacht Company, Hayling Island, UK 50 48.27’N 0’58.24W via Wicor Marine, UK
14 September 2015 | St Anne, Alderney 49’43.47N 2’11.35W – Beaulei River, UK 50’27.32N 2’32.09W via Studland Bay, UK
12 September 2015 | Gosselin, Sark 49’25.78N 2’22.70W – St Anne, Alderney 49’43.47N 2’11.35W
07 September 2015 | St Peter Port, Guernsey 49’27.32N 2’32.09W – Harve Gosselin, Sark 49’25.78N 2’22.70W
01 September 2015 | Tregarvan, Aulne River, France 48’15.16N 4’14.00W – St Peter Port, Guernsey 49’27.32N 2’32.09W via Cameret Sur Mer, France & Herm, Guernsey
23 August 2015 | Ile de Penfret, Iles de Glenan, France 47’43.05N 3’57.04W – Tregarvan, Aulne River, France 48’15.16N 4’14.00W via Anse de Kerautret, River Odet, France, Englishmans Cove, River Odet, France & Camerat sur Mer, France
19 August 2015 | Treac’h er Gourhed, Ile Houat, France 47’22.99N 2’56.85W - Ile de Penfret, Iles de Glenan, France 47’43.05N 3’57.04W via Port Kerel, Belle Ile, France & Port Tudy, Groix, France
14 August 2015 | La Rochelle, France 46’08.60N 1’10.09W – Treac’h er Gourhed, Ile Houat, France 47’22.99N 2’56.85W via Anse des Vieilles, Ile d’Yeu, France & Trebezy, St Nazaire, France
08 August 2015 | Anse l’Oubye, Ile de Re, France 46 09.2455 N 1’15.50W – La Rochelle, France 46’08.60N 1’10.09W
04 August 2015 | Ribadesella, Spain 43’27.81N 5’03.71W – Anse l’Oubye, Ile de Re, France 46 09.2455 N 1’15.50W
01 August 2015 | Ribadesella, Spain 43’27.81N 5’03.71W
28 July 2015 | Luarco, Spain 43’32.87N 6’32.08W – Ribadesella, Spain 43’27.81N 5’03.71W via Laurno
24 July 2015 | Ria Vivero, Spain 43’40.55N 7‘36.16W – Luarco, Spain 43’32.87N 6’32.08W via Ribadeo, Spain
21 July 2015 | Ria de Cedeira, Spain 43’39.26N 8’03.74W – Ria Vivero, Spain 43’40.55N 7‘36.16W
16 July 2015 | Vila Franca do Campo, Sao Miguel, Azores 37’43.01N 25’25.75W – Ria de Cedeira, Spain 43’39.26N 8’03.74W, via Ponta Delgada, Sao Miguel, Azores
06 July 2015 | Ponta Delgada, Sao Miguel, Azores 37’44.29N 25’39.94W – Vila Franca do Campo, Sao Miguel, Azores 37’43.01N 25’25.75W
30 June 2015 | Angra do Heroismo, Terceira, Azores 38’39.15N 27’12.97W – Ponta Delgada, Sao Migual, Azores 37’44.29N 25’39.94W
25 June 2015 | Velas, Sao Jorge, Azores 38’40.82N 28’12.16W – Angra do Heroismo, Terceira, Azores 38’39.15N 27’12.97W
19 June 2015 | Horta, Faial, Azores 38’31.99N 28’37.50W – Velas, Sao Jorge, Azores 38’40.82N 28’12.16W via Cais do Pico, Pico Azores

If I had a million dollars. I’d buy you a monkey.

22 March 2013 | Charlestown, Nevis, 17’08.14N 62’37.90W – Whitehorse Bay, St Kitts, 17’15.03N 62’39.49W
As a child you probably drew many desert islands and read about them in far fetched tales such as Robinson Crusoe or Treasure Island. Central to the island would be a smoking volcano; this would be surrounded by impenetrable rain forests where old ruins occasionally peaked out of the dense flora and fauna. Around the outside would be a couple of broken down forts, complete with cannons and there would be beaches, make of rock, ideal for wrecking boats, and sand, ideal for landing them. As an adult you could take this map and simply write on the bottom “Welcome to Nevis”.

Nevis gave up many of its delights easily and the most surprising of these were the green monkeys. These little critters are brilliant and Iain asked Fiona many times if she’d like to have one on the boat, every time she retorted that having one monkey on board was enough. Their favourite trick is to sit in fruit trees that overhang the road and munch on the ripening fruit. When the said fruit is finished they wait for a truck or car to pass by and then drop their quarry. The resulting clang or thud clearly gives them heaps of amusement and gives the driver a serious fright. The form of transport that they’d never come across before however were the Ruffian scooters and so we survived without sight or sound of any flying fruit as we scooted around the island.

One place that we couldn’t take the trusty scooters was seriously off-road where we hoped that we’d stumble upon some of the Ruins of the old plantation houses and sugar factories. We set off early doors with Willie & Irene from Quaver and headed into the hills. Within a couple of miles we’d come across a gatehouse where nature was taking over, if there is a gatehouse then there must be a house somewhere. Further up we walked and the path became smaller and smaller. Our persistence was rewarded as we found The Pinney Plantation House.

The Pinney Plantation House was the grandest building on the island, 3 stories high and set with magnificent views down into Pinney’s bay where Ruffian was moored. We could only imagine the opulence of having servants cooing to your every wish whilst you sat drinking your rum punch on your veranda. We also found the source of the money with lots of discarded industrial paraphernalia scattered around including some huge steel kettles which were used to boil and reduce the sugar cane juice. Times have changed and moved on but the rich few will clearly mourn those times.

After having a long hot and dusty walk, Nevis gave us the greatest if surprises. Nevis is a volcanic island and consequently parts of the island are superheated, some of these parts are lucky enough to be cooled by streams and the streams carry the heat down to the sea. We happened across one of these red hot streams where the water flows at over 105 degrees Fahrenheit. Socks and shoes were quickly discarded and we paddled in water that opened our pores and cleaned us like we have never been cleaned before. As you could imagine, with the state of personal hygiene on Ruffian, the stream flowed in clear and out a rather nasty murky colour but the crew of Ruffian were now squeaky clean.

Our time on Nevis was also super super social. With Mad Fish & Chewsy already in the anchorage we’d also been joined by Quaver and there was a special occasion in the offing on Quaver. Willie’s big day was upon us and it was time for cake and presents. Iain, as ever, got busy with a needle and thread producing yet another bag and Irene got busy with her cake making skills. Not only did she manage to produce a delicate light fluffy iced sponge but she’s also created a sailing scene on it. Quick as a flash Fiona identified Quaver sailing along, as there was a candle out of place and Iain, in an amazing piece of lateral thinking, identified the big lump of icing as the water spout they’d happened across on the way to Nevis.

So with the child’s desert island of Nevis explored and its delights discovered we have once again moved on. Nevis’s sister Island of St Kitts is a massive 6 miles away and we hope that she’ll give up her delights just as easily.

There is occasional rain in the Caribbean and it is usually accompanied by happy rainbows and little aquatic Leprechauns.


Nature is taking a while to takeover the sugar plantations, but takeover it will.


Larry gets ideas way above his station.


Ruffian sitting outside Charlestown under yet another volcano.


Iain finally gets Fiona to surrender. It only took a 400 year old cannon.


Ahhh soaking tired feet in the volcanic hot springs.


Iain completely agreed with the local graffiti in the bath house.


Wow. There are fish out there. The local fishermen show us how it’s done.


They say that when you can see the top of the volcano Nevis looks like a sombrero.


Devastation at a fort built in 1702. Anybody from the National Trust would have apoplexy.


Fiona rocks on her scooter. Long, long downhills really help things.


Monkeys are so very, very cool and are everywhere. If I had a million dollars, I’d buy you a monkey. Haven’t you always wanted a monkey?


It’s someone’s birthday and so it’s bag making time.


Happy birthday Willie.


Here’s looking at you kid.


Some of the plantation houses would have been truly amazing in their day, but require some serious TLC to restore them to their former glory.



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Vessel Name: Ruffian
Vessel Make/Model: Sadler 34
Hailing Port: Newcastle
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Created 29 January 2016

Who we are.

Port: Newcastle