A little boat and a big ocean.

19 July 2020
18 September 2015 | Beaulieu River, UK 50’27.32N 2’32.09W – Hayling Yacht Company, Hayling Island, UK 50 48.27’N 0’58.24W via Wicor Marine, UK
14 September 2015 | St Anne, Alderney 49’43.47N 2’11.35W – Beaulei River, UK 50’27.32N 2’32.09W via Studland Bay, UK
12 September 2015 | Gosselin, Sark 49’25.78N 2’22.70W – St Anne, Alderney 49’43.47N 2’11.35W
07 September 2015 | St Peter Port, Guernsey 49’27.32N 2’32.09W – Harve Gosselin, Sark 49’25.78N 2’22.70W
01 September 2015 | Tregarvan, Aulne River, France 48’15.16N 4’14.00W – St Peter Port, Guernsey 49’27.32N 2’32.09W via Cameret Sur Mer, France & Herm, Guernsey
23 August 2015 | Ile de Penfret, Iles de Glenan, France 47’43.05N 3’57.04W – Tregarvan, Aulne River, France 48’15.16N 4’14.00W via Anse de Kerautret, River Odet, France, Englishmans Cove, River Odet, France & Camerat sur Mer, France
19 August 2015 | Treac’h er Gourhed, Ile Houat, France 47’22.99N 2’56.85W - Ile de Penfret, Iles de Glenan, France 47’43.05N 3’57.04W via Port Kerel, Belle Ile, France & Port Tudy, Groix, France
14 August 2015 | La Rochelle, France 46’08.60N 1’10.09W – Treac’h er Gourhed, Ile Houat, France 47’22.99N 2’56.85W via Anse des Vieilles, Ile d’Yeu, France & Trebezy, St Nazaire, France
08 August 2015 | Anse l’Oubye, Ile de Re, France 46 09.2455 N 1’15.50W – La Rochelle, France 46’08.60N 1’10.09W
04 August 2015 | Ribadesella, Spain 43’27.81N 5’03.71W – Anse l’Oubye, Ile de Re, France 46 09.2455 N 1’15.50W
01 August 2015 | Ribadesella, Spain 43’27.81N 5’03.71W
28 July 2015 | Luarco, Spain 43’32.87N 6’32.08W – Ribadesella, Spain 43’27.81N 5’03.71W via Laurno
24 July 2015 | Ria Vivero, Spain 43’40.55N 7‘36.16W – Luarco, Spain 43’32.87N 6’32.08W via Ribadeo, Spain
21 July 2015 | Ria de Cedeira, Spain 43’39.26N 8’03.74W – Ria Vivero, Spain 43’40.55N 7‘36.16W
16 July 2015 | Vila Franca do Campo, Sao Miguel, Azores 37’43.01N 25’25.75W – Ria de Cedeira, Spain 43’39.26N 8’03.74W, via Ponta Delgada, Sao Miguel, Azores
06 July 2015 | Ponta Delgada, Sao Miguel, Azores 37’44.29N 25’39.94W – Vila Franca do Campo, Sao Miguel, Azores 37’43.01N 25’25.75W
30 June 2015 | Angra do Heroismo, Terceira, Azores 38’39.15N 27’12.97W – Ponta Delgada, Sao Migual, Azores 37’44.29N 25’39.94W
25 June 2015 | Velas, Sao Jorge, Azores 38’40.82N 28’12.16W – Angra do Heroismo, Terceira, Azores 38’39.15N 27’12.97W
19 June 2015 | Horta, Faial, Azores 38’31.99N 28’37.50W – Velas, Sao Jorge, Azores 38’40.82N 28’12.16W via Cais do Pico, Pico Azores

Corner queen. Eyes like a laser beam.

17 April 2013 | Magens Bay, St Thomas, USVI, 18’21.90N 64’55.41W – Trellis Bay, Beef Island, BVI 18’26.79N 64’32.03W via Hawkshead Bay, St Johns, USVI & Waterlemon Bay, St Johns, USVI
Empires were built on many things. The Romans built theirs on a mixture of cunning military strategy and slavery; In Peru, according to Larry, the Mayans used the undeniable power and flexibility of Llama's to conquer the high mountain passes of the Andes, whilst the English empire was built on the best of foundations; tea. This is typically mixed with milk and if you are a builder a good few sugars. The conquering of oceans by Ruffian usually starts with a good dose of tea and you can therefore imagine the pain Fiona has gone through when we realised that tea was not on the menu as we readied ourselves to leave the USVI's and make for the BVI's where we had our first deadline since the Canaries.

There was going to be an early start from Magens Bay in St Thomas as we were going to be on our way to the marine park that is the whole of St Johns. As we awoke, into the brewed tea went the milk, which came out in lumps. Not a problem, we'd just have to revert to powdered milk from the bilges. This was made up and it looked like something that was more akin to coming out of a horror movie than a cow. There would now be no tea until we got to the Road Town in the BVI's in days to come. Horror. Fiona was grumpy with a big grump.

After sailing off our anchor at Magens and getting a little round of applause from a charter boat tea starved spirits were lifted as we came into the marine park. The seas were, as usual, sparkling and flat, but spirits rose to a new high when we found that we could pick up the wifi from the posh resort across the way. What followed was so 21st century. We'd check mail, swim with fishies, download data, swim with fishies, pull gribs and swim with fishies. We like the marine park, it's fishies and the posh resorts with open internet.

Our journey through the marine park continued and en route to meet our deadline of seeing Quaver at Trellis Bay, we happened across more stunning bays, restored sugar plantations and even some other participants in the Salty Dawg Rally which will help us get to America in the coming weeks.

Fiona clearly wanted to get to Road Town quickly to get the tea situation resolved. Heading into the British waters of the BVI's we entered into an upwind battle with a 45ft catamaran. With the incentive of tea and the honour of all monohull sailors resting on our shoulders we nailed the cat and entered Road Town streets ahead. It helped that Fiona, now known as "The corner queen", got every layline exactly right and called every wind shift. You can take the racing sailor out of the raceboat, but she's still a racing sailor at heart.

With renewed vigour, and of course now full of tea, we entered Trellis Bay to meet up with Quaver, having last seen her in Anguilla. Upon entry we were faced with a sea of mooring balls. Boats were packed together like sardines, but without the tomato sauce and we simply didn't think that there was anywhere to anchor. Once we realised however that we'd be paying an outrageous $30 to pick up a ball we searched for a space with renewed vigour. This was going to be the bravest, closest and shallowest anchoring that we'd done to date. All that time in Scotland and Spain was now going to pay dividends.

With the anchor set in a space where we could nearly step off Ruffian onto 3 other boats or even onto the reef. We welcomed Willie onboard like a long lost friend, satisfied that we'd both saved ourselves $30 and also made our first deadline in months. Now it's time to explore the playground of the BVI's.

Sailing upwind makes a bit of a change and brings a smile to the face.


Until you look forward and realise you're having to pound through the seas.


Flat anchorages, stunning scenery. Welcome to the marine park of St Johns.


Sitting on the high side.


The powerhouse of the sugar plantation. The windmill.


Another opportunity for stunning swimming and snorkelling amongst colourful fishies.


Welcome to the BVI's where the hot rod seems to reign.


Welcome to the BVI's where the pussers outpost reigns.


The tea situation resolves itself.


The most crowded anchorage at Trellis Bay. We just found space enough to anchor behind the shallows and saved ourselves the outrageous $30 cost of picking up a mooring ball.


Comments
Vessel Name: Ruffian
Vessel Make/Model: Sadler 34
Hailing Port: Newcastle
Ruffian's Photos - Main
Photos 1 to 8 of 8
1
 
1
1 Photo
Created 29 January 2016

Who we are.

Port: Newcastle