A little boat and a big ocean.

19 July 2020
18 September 2015 | Beaulieu River, UK 50’27.32N 2’32.09W – Hayling Yacht Company, Hayling Island, UK 50 48.27’N 0’58.24W via Wicor Marine, UK
14 September 2015 | St Anne, Alderney 49’43.47N 2’11.35W – Beaulei River, UK 50’27.32N 2’32.09W via Studland Bay, UK
12 September 2015 | Gosselin, Sark 49’25.78N 2’22.70W – St Anne, Alderney 49’43.47N 2’11.35W
07 September 2015 | St Peter Port, Guernsey 49’27.32N 2’32.09W – Harve Gosselin, Sark 49’25.78N 2’22.70W
01 September 2015 | Tregarvan, Aulne River, France 48’15.16N 4’14.00W – St Peter Port, Guernsey 49’27.32N 2’32.09W via Cameret Sur Mer, France & Herm, Guernsey
23 August 2015 | Ile de Penfret, Iles de Glenan, France 47’43.05N 3’57.04W – Tregarvan, Aulne River, France 48’15.16N 4’14.00W via Anse de Kerautret, River Odet, France, Englishmans Cove, River Odet, France & Camerat sur Mer, France
19 August 2015 | Treac’h er Gourhed, Ile Houat, France 47’22.99N 2’56.85W - Ile de Penfret, Iles de Glenan, France 47’43.05N 3’57.04W via Port Kerel, Belle Ile, France & Port Tudy, Groix, France
14 August 2015 | La Rochelle, France 46’08.60N 1’10.09W – Treac’h er Gourhed, Ile Houat, France 47’22.99N 2’56.85W via Anse des Vieilles, Ile d’Yeu, France & Trebezy, St Nazaire, France
08 August 2015 | Anse l’Oubye, Ile de Re, France 46 09.2455 N 1’15.50W – La Rochelle, France 46’08.60N 1’10.09W
04 August 2015 | Ribadesella, Spain 43’27.81N 5’03.71W – Anse l’Oubye, Ile de Re, France 46 09.2455 N 1’15.50W
01 August 2015 | Ribadesella, Spain 43’27.81N 5’03.71W
28 July 2015 | Luarco, Spain 43’32.87N 6’32.08W – Ribadesella, Spain 43’27.81N 5’03.71W via Laurno
24 July 2015 | Ria Vivero, Spain 43’40.55N 7‘36.16W – Luarco, Spain 43’32.87N 6’32.08W via Ribadeo, Spain
21 July 2015 | Ria de Cedeira, Spain 43’39.26N 8’03.74W – Ria Vivero, Spain 43’40.55N 7‘36.16W
16 July 2015 | Vila Franca do Campo, Sao Miguel, Azores 37’43.01N 25’25.75W – Ria de Cedeira, Spain 43’39.26N 8’03.74W, via Ponta Delgada, Sao Miguel, Azores
06 July 2015 | Ponta Delgada, Sao Miguel, Azores 37’44.29N 25’39.94W – Vila Franca do Campo, Sao Miguel, Azores 37’43.01N 25’25.75W
30 June 2015 | Angra do Heroismo, Terceira, Azores 38’39.15N 27’12.97W – Ponta Delgada, Sao Migual, Azores 37’44.29N 25’39.94W
25 June 2015 | Velas, Sao Jorge, Azores 38’40.82N 28’12.16W – Angra do Heroismo, Terceira, Azores 38’39.15N 27’12.97W
19 June 2015 | Horta, Faial, Azores 38’31.99N 28’37.50W – Velas, Sao Jorge, Azores 38’40.82N 28’12.16W via Cais do Pico, Pico Azores

Whoop whoop. Danger danger.

28 July 2015 | Luarco, Spain 43’32.87N 6’32.08W – Ribadesella, Spain 43’27.81N 5’03.71W via Laurno
Some sports are dangerous in the extreme and can cause the participants great discomfort whilst competing. If you goad a crocodile with a sharp stick then you expect that things will probably not end well, or if you're in the front row of a scrum then at some point you're going to have your head in some smelly blokes crotch and feel sick to your stomach with the smell. Two activities that you would expect to be soft and gentle are sailing and show jumping and in both cases we have challenged the usual perception and found them extreme and uncomfortable.

As we left Luarco Iain felt like the chap in the scrum. The sky was grey, the horizon unclear and the contents of his stomach wanted to see the light of day again. As Iain hurled with all his might the thought of sniffing a smelly blokes crotch seemed preferable to the affliction of seasickness. Fiona in her own special way, instead of holding Iain's hair out of his vomit and comforting him, sat and read books, or pottered about while having cravings for the sick making treat of egg mayo sandwiches.

Finally rounding to corner into the sheltered bay of Laurno Iain got away from the proverbial stinky crotch and felt a new lease of life. The environs of the bay were alive. Thousands of people sunned themselves on the long stretch of sandy beach while above on the cliffs, loudspeakers announced unintelligible, but clearly exciting things, as flags fluttered giving the massed crowds some shade. Luarno looked like fun.

Taking to the hills we found the genteel sport of show jumping and at the highest of high levels. This was the national championship. All around us the finest beasts were groomed, warmed up and then set loose in the arena. No expense had been spared at this high level of competition from the top of the horses heads to the bottom of their feet and we were about to get a close and personal view of this investment.

We settled down by a set of 3 challenging fences that looked too high for anything equine to clear and watched in awe as horse after horse flew over them. Then disaster struck. A beast refused his masters command, reared up and threw a heavy metal shoe.

The shoe soared high into the sky until it was a mere dot and then the effects of gravity started taking over. As it plummeted towards the ground it was heading straight for Iain, who had to make a life or death decision. Protect himself and his lovely wife from the incoming object or snivel like a coward and hope for the best.

Like Batfink, with his shield of steel, Iain rose up and swatted away the offending lump of steel as it flew through the air, like it was nothing more than a fly. With this simple brave task he showed that show jumping is dangerous in the extreme for the crowd and revelled in his now found fame. The smile however quickly dropped from his face as the bruising on his arm grew and the reality of the danger the shoe posed, complete with studs and nails, to his overall wellbeing became apparent.

This really was a full on a knarly full contact; for the spectators!

Looking for a less dangerous pastime and after doing an awful lot of very painful administration (which made being impaled by a horseshoe look like fun) we have pushed on under the gaze of the Picos de Europa where rain is set to fall and mountains are set to be climbed

A stormy morning awaits us offshore.


Iain is not enjoying his trip.


That's a view we've not seen in a long time. The beach at Laurno is popular.


Jump horsey jump.


Iain with his prized 'shoe'.


Ruffian the Chinese laundry.


Poor things. They've got a 250mile beat to get here.


Ahhh. Ruffian, anchor, flat seas.


The paths go on and on and on.


We really need to invest in a selfie stick.


The coastline is dramatic with the Pico's de Europa towering over us.


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Vessel Name: Ruffian
Vessel Make/Model: Sadler 34
Hailing Port: Newcastle
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Created 29 January 2016

Who we are.

Port: Newcastle