Destiny Explores

Vessel Name: Destiny
Vessel Make/Model: Ericson 33
Hailing Port: Rochester, NY
Crew: Alicia & Bill Baum
14 July 2019 | New London
11 July 2019
04 July 2019
03 July 2019 | NYC
02 July 2019 | Gravesend
29 June 2019 | Annapolis
22 June 2019 | Annapolis, MD
19 June 2019
15 June 2019 | Mill Creek, Chesapeake Bay
13 June 2019
12 June 2019 | Mobjack Bay
25 May 2019 | North of Pungo Ferry
24 May 2019 | ICW 88
21 May 2019 | Adams Creek
12 May 2019 | Ocracoke. NC
09 May 2019 | Ocracoke, NC
08 May 2019 | Oriental, NC
20 April 2018 | No Name Harbor
16 April 2018 | Key West
Recent Blog Posts
14 July 2019 | New London

New London, CT

We spent a couple days in New London and our time there coincided with Sailfest. For three days every July there are carnival rides along the downtown waterfront and a large selection of festival food tents and purveyors of summertime trinkets lining the streets. The Sailfest unfortunately had nothing [...]

11 July 2019

Long Island Harbors!

The North shore of Long Island has some very nice destinations for cruisers!

04 July 2019

Happy 4th

03 July 2019 | NYC

Welcome to NY

Up early today and moving quickly to ride the favorable currents from NY Harbor to Long Island Sound.

02 July 2019 | Gravesend

Sailing Chesapeake City to Coney Island

We are on a mission to find cooler weather. Soooooooooo, we checked the currents in the Chesapeake, the C&D canal, and the Delaware Bay. We needed to make sure that the flow was favorable for the direction we were going - North - and we made a plan. We would sail to NY Harbor.

29 June 2019 | Annapolis

Annapolis is nice ... and hot!

No, the sky is not on fire...it just feels like it.

New London, CT

14 July 2019 | New London
Mostly Bill | Sunny
We spent a couple days in New London and our time there coincided with Sailfest. For three days every July there are carnival rides along the downtown waterfront and a large selection of festival food tents and purveyors of summertime trinkets lining the streets. The Sailfest unfortunately had nothing todo with sailing - but we did learn that 150 years ago New London was a significant whaling port.

There was a fascinating vessel to tour, a visiting retired Fireboat, Fire Fighter, from the New York Fire Department. Eighty years old, it is still self propelled, using the same 16-cylinder diesel engines used on WWII diesel subs. Tom, a volunteer, retired from the Coast Guard, was great fun to talk with. A Brooklynite for life, a great baseball fan, a young fan of the New York Dodgers at Ebbetts Field, he sounded and made me feel that I was talking to my father. The accent. He was also so enthusiastic about our sailing and cruising! He said we were the real Captains. He was great!



The picture is of me (foolishly) looking down the barrel of one of the eight water cannons on this boat. The boat has tremendous pumps that take in water from the ocean and send it out these cannons. In the aftermath of 9/11 this boat was docked and used simply to refill fire trucks in lower Manhattan.
Very impressive!

Finally a front row seat
Finally a front row seat

The Coast Guard Academy is in New London, and we thanked a young woman who was out running in her cadet workout clothes.



For us it seemed we had passed a geographic and cultural boundary. The local sandwich shops were selling "grinders", not heros (or subs), and we had fantastic clam strip and fish plates for lunch. So clearly we had exited the influence of New York City, and were now in New England!

Long Island Harbors!

11 July 2019
Bill
The North shore of Long Island has some very nice destinations for cruisers!

Port Washington is a nicely protected harbor, close to New York City. There's a railroad station near the harbor that takes you to Manhattan in 25 minutes! They offer free moorings for two nights, free pumpout boat, and an attractive town. This harbor, and the East and West shores leading in, are in fact the setting of The Great Gatsby. Fitzgerald lived and wrote the book here. The amazing estates are still here. Alongside the estates it was interesting to see that the community itself has diversified-the best barbershop in town is run by three guys from South America, the laundromat shows Telemundo on TV, and the grocery store has a lot of spoken Spanish.

We stayed for three nights in Port Washington, and could have stayed longer, especially if we had chosen to go into New York.



Northport Harbor was also very nice! This is a very large, totally protected, natural harbor, with several arms and bays within, spanning perhaps 4 by 4 miles, and including the downtowns of Northport and Huntington. We anchored on the inside of one of the harbor-forming spits of beach, in a beautiful spot. This was wonderfully quiet during the week, but we found out that it gets completely crazy on weekend days when every 20-foot motorboat around anchors off this beach and parties all day. It's noisy and choppy all day, but we know that all motorboats go home at night so the night at least is peaceful, even on weekends



The town itself of Northport is very welcoming to cruisers. The photo above shows Destiny tied up to the free town dock for the day, which made all town chores so easy. Groceries, laundry, pumpout, water-fill, and of course ice cream(!). They have a dinghy dock, but bringing the big boat in was easy.



Northport is a very pretty town. There's a large shady park right at the water front, and the main street is busy with active shops and restaurants. This is an old town- there are buildings dating from the 1890's, and the concrete main street has not needed repaving since the trolley line stopped running in 1924!(the track still runs down the center).

These North shore towns are so much different than the South shore of Long Island where I grew up! These are older towns, with hills, and big rocks, and big hardwood trees. The South shore is all low lying and sandy.

A puzzling feature of visiting these harbors, for us, had been the almost complete absence of other cruisers. The towns have mooring fields with hundreds of local boats, and we do see boats anchored that hail within this local area. However, we have only seen one or two boats from far away. Our only theory on this is that when cruisers pass through The City into Long Island Sound they move quickly East to Block Island, Cape Cod, and Martha's Vineyard. We know, from our cruise in 2012, that those areas are very busy with cruisers.

Oh, well, we may meet those crowds soon enough as we continue East.

(A special treat in these harbors were the July 4 fireworks- in the days surrounding the holiday we saw ten fireworks displays, from towns in all directions!)

( For those who read earlier of our flight from The Chesapeake Heat, that has been a complete success. It is much cooler on the Long Island Sound!)

Happy 4th

04 July 2019
Alicia Baum

Welcome to NY

03 July 2019 | NYC
Alicia Baum
Up early today and moving quickly to ride the favorable currents from NY Harbor to Long Island Sound.


NY Harbor anchorage


The view up the the Hudson River


The American Copper Building (the bendy one)

Sailing Chesapeake City to Coney Island

02 July 2019 | Gravesend
Alicia Baum | Hot and largely windless
We are on a mission to find cooler weather. Soooooooooo, we checked the currents in the Chesapeake, the C&D canal, and the Delaware Bay. We needed to make sure that the flow was favorable for the direction we were going - North - and we made a plan. We would sail to NY Harbor.

We left Weems Creek (pictured above) and visited the fuel docks in Annapolis just as they opened because we needed to fill up for a long motoring event. Despite the call for a long sail we knew there was little wind in our
future.


Sunset at Chesapeake City

We motored to Chesapeake City which is mid-way through the C&D canal and stopped because the flow was going to turn against us before we could get down the Delaware Bay. We dropped the hook just before sunset and then waited. We waited for the currents in the Delaware Bay and the canal to both be neutral or favorable for getting out to the ocean.

There are lots of large vessels that take the C&D canal as a short cut (saving 300 miles) between the Port of Baltimore and NE cities and Europe.


We passed this large boat on our way to the ocean. I assume they don't adhere to any of the sailor's superstitions regarding bananas on boats.

There was little to no wind and no waves at Cape May so we took the inside route to the Cape May Channel and cleared the shoals around Cape May before sunset.

We then motored, motor-sailed and sailed our way along the Jersey coast.

We watched mysterious lights morph from what-the-heck-is-that? to a group of fishing boats? to finally reveal it self as .... Atlantic City.

We watched the stars, and Tugs with tows, and other sailboats move through the night.

We watched fishing boats and chartered boats come out at first light to drop their lines on designated reefs.

We watched the Jersey Biting Flies arrive. Now on Lake Ontario the biting flies arrive at around 2 knots or less of breeze. The Jersey Biting Flies don't know this rule. They come in many sizes, and they are tough, tenacious, terrors that handle 10 knots of breeze just fine. We spent the day swatting, swishing, and covered head to toe trying to outwit, outplay and outlast the Jersey Flies.


Finally, we sailed to the entrance of NY Harbor took down the sails and motored around Coney Island into Gravesend Bay and dropped the hook to wait the night.

BTW, Jersey Flies don't like NY. They left the boat when we anchored.

Annapolis is nice ... and hot!

29 June 2019 | Annapolis
Bill | Sticky and HOT
No, the sky is not on fire...it just feels like it.

On our final day in Annapolis it was 98°. We've spent the last few days running errands and site-seeing in the mornings and hiding out on/in the boat with misters and fans during the heat of the day. Re-emerging once the sun sinks behind the trees for a quick paddle and a cold dinner.

All in all Annapolis has been a great stop. It is very cruiser friendly. We're anchored in Weems Creek, with protection from big wind and waves. We paddle just 60 yards to a dinghy landing, where we keep our bikes locked up. Groceries 0.5 mile, Downtown 1.5 mi, and major retail 1.5 mi the other way. They even have a pumpout boat that you call on the VHF radio and they come right to our boat. It's a very pretty place.

But... it's hot! So we have to leave...

Destiny's Photos - Main
17 Photos
Created 25 May 2019
19 Photos
Created 13 April 2018
2017 Pictures
15 Photos
Created 17 January 2017
74 Photos
Created 12 January 2016
2015 Cruise
102 Photos
Created 12 January 2015
Destiny Explores 2014
74 Photos
Created 23 January 2014
15 Photos
Created 10 March 2013
3 Photos
Created 29 August 2012