Sellixs Set Sail

Vessel Name: Pied-a-Mer III
Vessel Make/Model: Seawind 1160 Catamaran
Hailing Port: Clatskanie, OR
Crew: Pam & Eric
About: Pam (the Admiral among other things) Our wonderful boat cat Rose spent her final year with Terrell in the US. She lived a good life, loved to sail!
Extra: Pied-a-Mer III is our home. We live where the wind takes us. Currently on the hard in The BoatYard in Neiafu, The Kingdom of Tonga.
09 May 2018 | Vava’u, The Kingdom of Tonga
07 February 2018 | Samoa
07 February 2018 | Tonga
28 April 2017 | Great Barrier Island
05 February 2017 | Opua, New Zealand
09 November 2016 | Bay of Islands, New Zealand
26 October 2016 | Baie de Kuto, Isle of Pines
11 October 2016 | PortmSud
10 October 2016 | Port Moselle Marina. Noumea, New Caledonia
12 August 2016 | Vuda Marina, Fiji
09 July 2016 | Isle de Pines
30 May 2016 | Queensland
21 April 2016 | Queensland
21 April 2016 | The Boat Works
18 April 2016 | Tasman & Coral Seas
31 March 2016 | Newcastle, NSW
16 March 2016 | Rozelle Bay, Sydney Australia
05 January 2016 | Balls Head Bay, Sydney Harbour
Recent Blog Posts
09 May 2018 | Vava’u, The Kingdom of Tonga

Getting Pied-a-Mer ready for sailing

After a whirlwind 2 1/2 months in the US visiting family, friends and taking care of restaurant business, we are back in the Kingdom of Tonga. We left the boat at The Boat Yard in Vaipuua on Vava’u. We had readied the boat for cyclone season and had made arrangements with the Boatyard to have her checked a couple of times a week. Other than a scattering of moldy patches, all was good inside the boat. The real work was to put Pied-a-Mer back together again and ready for the passage to Hawaii. Eric’s “to do” list included the following: MOTORS-Stops for Starboard prop, Check oil in both engines, remove oil from starboard, add oil to port, polish fuel, replaced air filter medium, new hose on starboard raw water, calibrate starboard throttle. HONDA GENERATOR-Run some and run dry, empty carburetor bowl, change oil. STANDING RIGGING-Tune mast, let inner diamonds loose, set bend with outer diamonds both port/starboard & fore/aft, reset inner diamonds to same tension as outer diamonds, set rake using jib and upper shrouds, reset lower shrouds. RUNNING RIGGING-finish stack pak ropes, ........In January we had ordered a new main and jib from Barracouta Sails in Australia, the maker of our original sails. Our new sails arrived on April ........We took our ripped main to Phillip at Vava’u Canvas Repair. This rip, right in the middle of the Sail between second and third reef was one of the reasons we had turned around in November. Once our main had been repaired we packed up the main and jib and rearranged storage space for our “spare sails”. We also waited for a part for the Sail drives which we had forgotten to purchase while in the US.

07 February 2018 | Samoa

Tonga to Samoa

November 2017, Heading Home From Neiafu, Tonga we made a four night passage to Apia, Samoa which is on the island of Upolu. With the exception of the last hour, it was an easy passage as we motor sailed the entire way----not the way we like to get from point A to B but sometimes it's the best way. [...]

07 February 2018 | Tonga

26 Day Passage Round Trip to Pago Pago

We seem to be making a habit of turning around. Our current “turn around” put us in The Kingdom of Tonga in cyclone season. In May we left Opua, New Zealand only to turn around after two and a half days at sea and return to Opuaâ€�"â€�"Cyclone Donna was in our way. In December, sixteen days after leaving Pago Pago, American Samoa for Hilo Hawaii, we turned around and headed back to Pago Pago. This second “turn around” was not due to a cyclone but to a ripped main, an engine that wasn’t working and a 5kt./ 400 mile wide current going the wrong way. We were out 26 days only to return to American Samoa where we sorted out our engine problemâ€�"â€�"-bad fuelâ€�"â€�"and then motored to The Kingdom of Tonga where we hauled out in The Boat Yard in Neiafu, Vava’u. Our “Iridium Go” allowed us to email the Boatyard to make sure they had room for us. Great grassy area at the Boatyard, perfect for marking Sail for repairs.

28 April 2017 | Great Barrier Island

PIED-a-Mer III Sails, Finally

After several months at anchor or on a pile mooring in Whangarei we finally headed south and had a wonderful time exploring Great Barrier Island-Aotea . Great Barrier Island was named by Captain Cook for the Barrier it forms between the Hauraki Gulf and the open sea. About 850 people live permanently [...]

05 February 2017 | Opua, New Zealand

Eric's Solar Project

We spent a month at anchor outside of the Bay of Islands Marina in Opua, NZ. Ten days were spent with seminars, tours, BBQ's and socializing, all part of the Island Cruising Associations "All Points Rally". After the Rally, Eric got down to the business of replacing existing solar and adding more solar. Hours of "design thoughts" went into the project and finally the plan and specs were ready for implementation. In order to mount the four 200 watt panels that were ordered, Eric needed to remove the two panels that were original to the boat and the two flexible panels that we added in Mexico. The four replacement panels were larger than our existing panels which meant their installation would require some creative engineering with stainless, aluminum, canvas and welding----right up Eric's engineering ally, with the exception of the welding which we had done in the boatyard in Opua. With modified stainless supports, the panels above the stern were installed, they are a a little longer than the original ones but they fit. The other two panels were installed on either side of the targa replacing the canvas pieces which held the flexible panels. We had recently bought a Sailrite sewing machine, which had been on Eric's "wish list" for several years, so we used the existing canvas to fill in the gaps and installed clear windows in the canvas at the two helms-----now we can see sail trim without leaning our heads around the helms. Our original solar plan of 330 watts was satisfactory in the tropics for keeping our freezer, refrigerator and most other things in electricity all day and all night long, but it would take until 4 or 5 in the afternoon before our batteries were at 100% which is appropriate to get through the evening. With our new panels of 840 watts---- on a bright day in NZ we are at 100% by 11:00 am. This is good because our next project is "sonic hull cleaning" which will take up 38 amp hours per day over and above our current usage of approximately 70 amp hours----a little over a 50% increase. Next Blog entry-------road trips!

09 November 2016 | Bay of Islands, New Zealand

Passage to New Zealand

We have been in Opua, New Zealand now for 5 days, long enough to do laundry, provision, locate boat parts and reconnect with cruising friends and meet new friends. Last night we got down to analyzing our passage from Noumea, New Caledonia to Opua and deemed it a good one. We had some very good winds, periods of very little wind, a few rain showers, daily SSB contact with friends, Jenny and Rich on sv Plan Sea and yes, we did have a couple of boat issues----does anyone know a boat that doesn't have a glitch or two on an ocean passage? Our first 24 hours out we covered 160.65 mm---which, for us, is very good. For the first couple of days the seas were pretty rolly but the sun was blazing---we were smiling. We would occasionally hit a "no wind" pocket, turn on an engine for a short time and then be back under sail. Day #3 we started the starboard engine and discovered that the prop was not functioning, now we are down to just the port engine. Now, we were OK with one functioning engine however, we knew we would need the starboard fuel as we still had at least 5 days of passage before we reached NZ. Day #3 was a day of continual wind shifts, confused seas, sail changes and motor motor sailing. Day # 4 was a good day of sailing, bad valve on propane tank (which Eric was able to temporarily solve) and we traded shorts for long pants and long sleeved shirts. This was the last day that we were able to see svPlan Sea----they changed course a bit and motor sailed ahead of us. We were trying to sail as much as possible. On my 1200-0400 watch on Day#5, the sky was as black as I had ever seen it. At 0605 we went to third reef with the main and reefed the jib-----sailed through the day. At 0600 on Day#6 Eric woke me up, the second reef line had broken and there was a ripped seam in the main sail. Eric immediately grabbed tape, etc. and, with me keeping the boat into the wind, taped the sail hoping to prevent further tearing. Our other major project for Day #6 was decanting two jerry cans of diesel into the port tank. Then, Day #7 brought successfully siphoning diesel from the starboard engine into jerry cans and then decanting the jerry cans into the port engine----all of this was done inside the boat---we didn't have to go out in the wind and rain. We had always talked about what we would do in a situation like this and now we know----it can be done. This was a good excercise. Maybe our success was due to pod of dolphins and a pod of whales that shared our "spot on the "ocean----we wished they had had AIS or nav lights. Day #8-----0942, at the Customs dock in Opua.

Getting Pied-a-Mer ready for sailing

09 May 2018 | Vava’u, The Kingdom of Tonga
Pam
After a whirlwind 2 1/2 months in the US visiting family, friends and taking care of restaurant business, we are back in the Kingdom of Tonga. We left the boat at The Boat Yard in Vaipuua on Vava’u. We had readied the boat for cyclone season and had made arrangements with the Boatyard to have her checked a couple of times a week. Other than a scattering of moldy patches, all was good inside the boat. The real work was to put Pied-a-Mer back together again and ready for the passage to Hawaii. Eric’s “to do” list included the following: MOTORS-Stops for Starboard prop, Check oil in both engines, remove oil from starboard, add oil to port, polish fuel, replaced air filter medium, new hose on starboard raw water, calibrate starboard throttle. HONDA GENERATOR-Run some and run dry, empty carburetor bowl, change oil. STANDING RIGGING-Tune mast, let inner diamonds loose, set bend with outer diamonds both port/starboard & fore/aft, reset inner diamonds to same tension as outer diamonds, set rake using jib and upper shrouds, reset lower shrouds. RUNNING RIGGING-finish stack pak ropes, ........In January we had ordered a new main and jib from Barracouta Sails in Australia, the maker of our original sails. Our new sails arrived on April ........We took our ripped main to Phillip at Vava’u Canvas Repair. This rip, right in the middle of the Sail between second and third reef was one of the reasons we had turned around in November. Once our main had been repaired we packed up the main and jib and rearranged storage space for our “spare sails”. We also waited for a part for the Sail drives which we had forgotten to purchase while in the US.

Tonga to Samoa

07 February 2018 | Samoa
Pam
November 2017, Heading Home From Neiafu, Tonga we made a four night passage to Apia, Samoa which is on the island of Upolu. With the exception of the last hour, it was an easy passage as we motor sailed the entire way----not the way we like to get from point A to B but sometimes it's the best way. Our last hour we were watching a huge black cloud which quickly turned the 15 kt wind to 30 kt and brought torrential rains----furled the jib/went to third reef and proceeded to the harbor entrance. As we've experienced in all foreign countries, checking into Samoa involved raising our Q flag, a series of VHF calls with a fishing boat, the Port Authority and then, aided by another cruiser, simply taking a side tie at the small marina. Several hours and much confusion later we were official and could raise our Samoan courtesy flag. The check in process when entering a new country is one of the many "adventures" we experience as cruisers and we embrace each check in with smiles, frowns and questions. This particular afternoon we ended the process with a cold bottle of Valima beer, poolside at Aggie Grey's Hotel, which according to Lonely Planet is Samoa's most famous address. Aggie Grey's was founded in 1933 and became a popular hangout of American servicemen during WWII. It is said that James Michener, in Tales of the South Pacific, patterned the character of Bloody Mary after Aggie Grey. After a couple of boat repairs and a trip to Digicel for SIM cards we began to play "tourist". First on our list was The Robert Lewis Stevenson Museum. The museum is housed in a 100 year old plantation home that was originally built by RLS, partially damaged by cyclones and restored. We were asked to take off our shoes before beginning the tour---first time to visit a museum with bare feet. The author's burial site is adjacent to the museum in the Mt. Vaea Scenic Reserve. A 45 minute hike up a steep, quite muddy, root covered trail brought us to the stately Victorian tomb.

Our plan the next day was to attend a free cultural show at the Samoan Information Center. The word " free" caught our attention----sweet words to a cruiser's budget. Samoa's history spans 3000 years and it's people were the first Polynesians to reclaim independence following European colonization. As such, the Samoans have held firmly to their customs. We spent several hours at the center and were immersed in the Samoan culture. We were taught how to weave palm fronds into plates and, after a demonstration of traditional cooking techniques for bananas, taro, breadfruit and fish, we ate a meal on our frond plates.

We were surprised to learn that all Tapa cloth is still made the "old" way by hand and what a long arduous process. Wood carving was being done by young men from surrounding villages. It was good to see traditional skills being passed from generation to generation. Our big splurge in Samoa was, along with friends on sv Armagh, renting a car for a week and touring the island. We traveled the coastal roads of Upolu and the inland arteries and the entire time we felt like we were in a huge botanical garden. Three nights were spent at the Matareva Beach Fales on the southwest coast. Arriving at the turn off that would take us to the resort we paid our 10 Tala to the village (the village fee) and drove a ways down a one-way dirt road. Matareva Beach is a postcard setting with white sand, clear blue/green water, palm trees and fabulous snorkeling. On our last night we had quite a rain squall that had the Matareva staff running around putting tarps up on our open air accommodations----we're cruisers, it was fresh water, we could deal with it! Another day we packed up our snorkel gear and headed to the village of Savaia where we snorkeled with giant clams in a marine protected area. The multicolored clams looked like they were artificial----purple, aqua, turquoise, pink, green and yellow. They were absolutely huge, 24-36 inches across, really big clams!! Am going to quit as I need to get this to Alicia before the newsletter deadline. To be continued next month. Eric & Pam Sellix sv Pied-a-Mer III

26 Day Passage Round Trip to Pago Pago

07 February 2018 | Tonga
Pam
We seem to be making a habit of turning around. Our current “turn around” put us in The Kingdom of Tonga in cyclone season. In May we left Opua, New Zealand only to turn around after two and a half days at sea and return to Opuaâ€�"â€�"Cyclone Donna was in our way. In December, sixteen days after leaving Pago Pago, American Samoa for Hilo Hawaii, we turned around and headed back to Pago Pago. This second “turn around” was not due to a cyclone but to a ripped main, an engine that wasn’t working and a 5kt./ 400 mile wide current going the wrong way. We were out 26 days only to return to American Samoa where we sorted out our engine problemâ€�"â€�"-bad fuelâ€�"â€�"and then motored to The Kingdom of Tonga where we hauled out in The Boat Yard in Neiafu, Vava’u. Our “Iridium Go” allowed us to email the Boatyard to make sure they had room for us. Great grassy area at the Boatyard, perfect for marking Sail for repairs.

PIED-a-Mer III Sails, Finally

28 April 2017 | Great Barrier Island
Pam
After several months at anchor or on a pile mooring in Whangarei we finally headed south and had a wonderful time exploring Great Barrier Island-Aotea . Great Barrier Island was named by Captain Cook for the Barrier it forms between the Hauraki Gulf and the open sea. About 850 people live permanently on the island and some aspects of modern life that we take for granted are simply absent. There are no main power stations, public water supply or sewage system, no banks or ATM's. Individual property owners provide their own power mostly through generators or solar. The lack of island power is very evident at night as there are no street lights. From anchor the island is very, very dark. Many of the reptiles, amphibians and birds on Atoea are now rare or extinct on mainland New Zealand.

We spent three days hiking Ateoa . The highlite was our second day when we stood atop Hirakimata/ Mt. Hobson, the highest point on the island at 621 meters above sea level. The Department of Conservation maintains walking tracks which are quite well marked and rated for level of fitness. All of the tracks that we took were rated for a moderate level of fitness, but after several hours of up and down, fording streams, clinging to hillsides and numerous rest stops, I do question their rating system! I was pleased, however, and surprised when, the morning after our Hirakimata hike, Eric enthusiastically suggested we dinghy to Port Fitzroy and take a short 90 minutes hike on what is called The Old Lady Track. The hike was a good one though definitely not for "old ladies".

We continue to be amazed and pleased at the freedom we have had in New Zealand as we visited the untouched wilderness areas. We have not seen fenced off areas on steep hillside tracks, we have used tree roots and branches handrails in the bush, no warnings about slippery rocks as we ford streams and no barriers as we look out over mountain tops. On occasion we have seen warning signs saying that we must be careful of steep drop-offs, and we are careful. Safety is our responsibility, we are responsible for ourselves, a refreshing concept!

Eric's Solar Project

05 February 2017 | Opua, New Zealand
Pam
We spent a month at anchor outside of the Bay of Islands Marina in Opua, NZ. Ten days were spent with seminars, tours, BBQ's and socializing, all part of the Island Cruising Associations "All Points Rally". After the Rally, Eric got down to the business of replacing existing solar and adding more solar. Hours of "design thoughts" went into the project and finally the plan and specs were ready for implementation. In order to mount the four 200 watt panels that were ordered, Eric needed to remove the two panels that were original to the boat and the two flexible panels that we added in Mexico. The four replacement panels were larger than our existing panels which meant their installation would require some creative engineering with stainless, aluminum, canvas and welding----right up Eric's engineering ally, with the exception of the welding which we had done in the boatyard in Opua. With modified stainless supports, the panels above the stern were installed, they are a a little longer than the original ones but they fit. The other two panels were installed on either side of the targa replacing the canvas pieces which held the flexible panels. We had recently bought a Sailrite sewing machine, which had been on Eric's "wish list" for several years, so we used the existing canvas to fill in the gaps and installed clear windows in the canvas at the two helms-----now we can see sail trim without leaning our heads around the helms. Our original solar plan of 330 watts was satisfactory in the tropics for keeping our freezer, refrigerator and most other things in electricity all day and all night long, but it would take until 4 or 5 in the afternoon before our batteries were at 100% which is appropriate to get through the evening. With our new panels of 840 watts---- on a bright day in NZ we are at 100% by 11:00 am. This is good because our next project is "sonic hull cleaning" which will take up 38 amp hours per day over and above our current usage of approximately 70 amp hours----a little over a 50% increase. Next Blog entry-------road trips!

Passage to New Zealand

09 November 2016 | Bay of Islands, New Zealand
Pam
We have been in Opua, New Zealand now for 5 days, long enough to do laundry, provision, locate boat parts and reconnect with cruising friends and meet new friends. Last night we got down to analyzing our passage from Noumea, New Caledonia to Opua and deemed it a good one. We had some very good winds, periods of very little wind, a few rain showers, daily SSB contact with friends, Jenny and Rich on sv Plan Sea and yes, we did have a couple of boat issues----does anyone know a boat that doesn't have a glitch or two on an ocean passage? Our first 24 hours out we covered 160.65 mm---which, for us, is very good. For the first couple of days the seas were pretty rolly but the sun was blazing---we were smiling. We would occasionally hit a "no wind" pocket, turn on an engine for a short time and then be back under sail. Day #3 we started the starboard engine and discovered that the prop was not functioning, now we are down to just the port engine. Now, we were OK with one functioning engine however, we knew we would need the starboard fuel as we still had at least 5 days of passage before we reached NZ. Day #3 was a day of continual wind shifts, confused seas, sail changes and motor motor sailing. Day # 4 was a good day of sailing, bad valve on propane tank (which Eric was able to temporarily solve) and we traded shorts for long pants and long sleeved shirts. This was the last day that we were able to see svPlan Sea----they changed course a bit and motor sailed ahead of us. We were trying to sail as much as possible. On my 1200-0400 watch on Day#5, the sky was as black as I had ever seen it. At 0605 we went to third reef with the main and reefed the jib-----sailed through the day. At 0600 on Day#6 Eric woke me up, the second reef line had broken and there was a ripped seam in the main sail. Eric immediately grabbed tape, etc. and, with me keeping the boat into the wind, taped the sail hoping to prevent further tearing. Our other major project for Day #6 was decanting two jerry cans of diesel into the port tank. Then, Day #7 brought successfully siphoning diesel from the starboard engine into jerry cans and then decanting the jerry cans into the port engine----all of this was done inside the boat---we didn't have to go out in the wind and rain. We had always talked about what we would do in a situation like this and now we know----it can be done. This was a good excercise. Maybe our success was due to pod of dolphins and a pod of whales that shared our "spot on the "ocean----we wished they had had AIS or nav lights. Day #8-----0942, at the Customs dock in Opua.
Pied-a-Mer III's Photos - Main
Josh Bell, the surveyor that Pantaenius sent from Brisbane, spent a day and a half going over the boat. We have waited a week for his report to be completed and sent to Pantaenius—-waiting, waiting. Day to Day events remain pretty much the same in the harbor except for one huge change. The derelict fishing boats were ordered to move by marina officials. We now have a view and no clanging and banging.
26 Photos
Created 7 June 2018
Arriving May 15 in American Samoa, under motor bringing mast along side the boat.
10 Photos
Created 25 May 2018
This was our second attempt to do a passage to Hawaii. Last November we left from American Samoa but had fuel, engine and ripped main issues. May 11 we again tried to do the passage leaving from Neiafu, Tonga. On May 15, we dismasted but we’re able to lash the mast on to the port side of the boat and motor to Pago Pago, American Samoa.
30 Photos
Created 25 May 2018
We continue to wait in Nieafu. We waited for finishing boat work, new sails from Australia, and leaving the boatyard, repairing the port engine once we had splashed, Eric's elbow to heal, Honda generator and oitboard to be fixed or not fixed.
13 Photos
Created 5 May 2018
Returned to Pied-a-Mer after a three month visit in the US. Arrangements had been made for someone to check the boat a couple of times a week and other than a film of mold,which we expected, everything was good. The weather is hotter that #@¥^_¥£ and it takes longer to do very simple tasks. It’s necessary to wear a sweat head band or it’s impossible to see.
8 Photos
Created 2 April 2018
More of road trip with Patty and Steve.
26 Photos
Created 12 March 2018
Arriving back in Neiafu with torn main. Sail repair and readying the boat for a 2 1/2 month visit to the states.
13 Photos
Created 27 February 2018
Leaving the boat in The Boatyard in Nieafu for storm season——spending 2 1/2 months in the states with family and friends.
40 Photos
Created 27 February 2018
Checking back into Tonga, Christmas.
39 Photos
Created 1 January 2018
Neiafu to Hawaii——nope, Tonga
11 Photos
Created 1 January 2018
2017–First visit to Pago Pago in 2017 with Patty and Steve on SV Armagh.
40 Photos
Created 1 January 2018
Two weeks in Samoa. Pied-a-Mer III in a slip at Apia Marina along with Armagh. Wonderful visit in a very laid-back, beautiful country. Probably the neatest, tidiest,most pristine island we have seen in The Pacific.
55 Photos
Created 6 November 2017
Joan & Mike Mellon visit from Santa Cruz, Calif. a wonderful three weeks of friendship, snorkeling, and rudders.
9 Photos
Created 30 October 2017
Many activities surrounding the birthday of King Aho'eitu Tupou VI Two nights of a Military Tattoo, an Agricultural Fair, Feasts, decorated boats. We saw and were close to the King on several occasions. Close enough to see his feet with black and silver NIKES.
63 Photos
Created 30 October 2017
Arrived in Nuku'alofa on Sunday May 28, 2017 from Opua, New Zealand. 10 days and 9 nights at sea. February 2018 Tongatapu was badly damaged by Cyclone Gita. Worst storm to hit the island in 60 years. Pied-a-Mer III was in Neiafu, Vava'u and Eric and I were in Oregon.
21 Photos
Created 21 July 2017
30 Photos
Created 23 April 2017
Wonderful anchorage, beautiful land.
13 Photos
Created 23 April 2017
Wonderful hiking on Great Barrier.
33 Photos
Created 20 April 2017
A morning tour of Hobbiton. When we made our reservation, I thought the price of $79.00/ person was a little steep but it was so worth the money. Great place.
30 Photos
Created 8 April 2017
Visiting Min & Terrell
11 Photos
Created 7 February 2017
Home base New Zealand, pile mooring at Town Basin.
8 Photos
Created 25 January 2017
Great day trip.
12 Photos
Created 25 January 2017
6 Photos
Created 25 January 2017
Hosted by Gary McGuire who we met in Mexico at one of our potluck S.
10 Photos
Created 25 January 2017
6 Photos
Created 24 January 2017
Indian Celebration--Ratha Yatra. Parade through the streets of Whangarei. Music, dancing and a sumptuous lunch---vegetarian--in the Cafler Park Rose Gardens.
15 Photos
Created 24 January 2017
Arrived in Whangarei on December 9, 2016. On a pile mooring at Town Basin.
15 Photos
Created 13 January 2017
November 4, 2016-December 8, 2016
84 Photos
Created 30 December 2016
Noumea, New Caledonia to Opua, New Zealand.
30 Photos
Created 27 October 2016
A week on a mooring ball off the uninhabited island of Laregnere. Fantastic snorkeling, beach walks, afternoon games and a yummy potluck with sv Plan Sea and sv Dream Car her.
14 Photos
Created 26 October 2016
Along with friends, Mike and Joan Mellon, we sailed the Mamanukas and Yasawa islands. We had a fabulous time.
27 Photos
Created 10 October 2016
Pittwater, Cowan Creek, Cottage Point, The Basin, Newcastle and Bar Hopping.
25 Photos
Created 24 April 2016
Milson's Point-The Bridge Walk, Elizabeth Farm, Rosehill NSW
20 Photos
Created 24 April 2016
This album includes travel by ferry, bus,might rail and train. All part of Sydney's mass transit system, using our OPAL cards.
20 Photos
Created 21 April 2016
Our trip down south. Wanted to take Pied-a-Mer III back to Woolongon as that's where she had been built. Jervis Bay was a highlight because that's where we were able to meet Melinda Mathews Brogan, Melinda Altamirano's Australian pen pal (and we didn't take one photo of her)
23 Photos
Created 19 April 2016
Balls Head Bay, Snails Bay, Rozelle, Middle Harbour, Port Hacking, Wollongong, Jervis Bay and back to Sydney.
65 Photos
Created 16 February 2016
Nieafu and island anchorages
9 Photos
Created 16 September 2015
Hiking Yelapa
11 Photos
Created 28 March 2013
Puerto Vallarta with Sellix,Altamirano and Choumanes
14 Photos
Created 1 January 2013
On the Bow.
4 Photos
Created 17 September 2012
First Photos
12 Photos
Created 2 June 2012
Noumea
32 Photos
Created 31 December 1969

About & Links

SailBlogs Groups