Our Ever-Changing Backyard--Sailing with Scoots

25 November 2019 | On passage from Fiji to New Zealand
21 November 2019 | On passage from Fiji to New Zealand
19 November 2019 | On passage from Fiji to New Zealand
14 October 2019 | Savusavu, Fiji
27 July 2019 | Tavoro Waterfalls, Taveuni Island, Fiji
15 July 2019 | Viani Bay
23 June 2019 | En route to Savusavu, Fiji, from N. Minerva Reef
20 June 2019 | North Minerva Reef
17 June 2019 | In the ocean, NE of New Zealand
14 June 2019 | In the ocean, NE of New Zealand
13 June 2019 | In the ocean, NE of New Zealand
12 June 2019 | Marsden Cove Marina, Ruakaka, NZ
06 May 2019 | Paradise Taveuni Resort
04 March 2019 | Koro Island

Radar fun, an inland tour, goodbye Nuku Hiva, hello to two new islands, and some Fun Facts

20 June 2016 | Hanavave Bay, Fatu Hiva, Marquesas
Vandy
Shortly after we returned to Taiohae Bay, our radar and chartplotter finally arrived! We picked up the three big boxes containing the components on a Saturday afternoon, started the installation on Sunday morning, and were done on Tuesday. Of course, we only worked on it during the day, reserving the evenings for socializing with friends, including listening to our San Jose Sharks play in the Stanley Cup Finals over the wifi.



Go Sharks!

The installation required many trips up to the top of the radar arch, where we balanced tools, the radar machinery, and ourselves, in the frequently rolly anchorage - and as many trips back down again. It also required a trip to the local hardware store to purchase a 1-inch drill bit. This turned into an impromptu guys' trip as Eric brought our friends Morris and Tom along because who doesn't like to peruse a hardware store?



On the radar arch

We also needed to drill four new holes in the stainless steel plate beneath the radar, as the pattern of holes needed for the new radar was different from the ones already there. Fortunately, Eric had brought along our big, heavy Cole hand drill, which can cut through stainless steel, though it takes awhile. Unfortunately, it's stored in a cubby waaaay back under the mattress in the aft cabin, which is currently crammed from bunk to ceiling with storage (hey, we're on a long trip, give us a break). So we had to redistribute the items from the aft cabin all over the rest of the boat, which looked "like a bomb had gone off inside of SCOOTS," according to one of our brutally honest friends who happened to visit during the process.

We would have had to empty the cabin anyway, so that we could remove the ceiling there to allow access to the wiring above it during the part of the radar installation lovingly known as "threading the wire."



Threading the wire

This part of the process went well enough, the wire being lubricated with a smattering of sailor words and a prodigious amount of perspiration, as it snaked its way from the top of the radar arch, down through the radar arch tubes, through Hell (as we call the cramped space beneath the aft part of the cockpit), up into the aft cabin ceiling, through the hanging locker, then up to the new chartplotter perched under the dodger in the forward part of the cockpit.

When the radar was installed, we fired it up and were happy to see lots of bright red blobs appear on the chartplotter screen, in the exact positions where boats were anchored. In other words, it worked!



It works!

And, a surprise feature of dubious benefit, our radar is also equipped with two sets of blue LEDs, one on each side of the device, that will allow us to light up the stern of our boat like a disco, with a night-vision-destroying, UFO-like blue glow. In case we ever want to do that.

With the radar installed, and our Sharks beaten in the Stanley Cup Finals, it was time for us to leave Nuku Hiva. But not without one final hurrah...our friends Tom and Sylvia from s/v Cinnabar arranged a land tour for six of us: themselves, Eric and I, and Morris and Debbie from s/v Impulsive.



The intrepid tourists

So on one particularly swelly day, when our boats were rolling like crazy and we all needed a break from the rock and roll, we dinghied to the small quay and met Jocelyn, our tour guide for the day. Jocelyn drove us all around the island, stopping at breathtaking overlooks, fascinating archaeological sites, and modern cultural centers, sharing all sorts of interesting information along the way, including these Fun Facts...

Fun Fact #1: the first butterflies arrived on Nuku Hiva only 13 years ago, as stowaways on some road construction equipment brought from Tahiti.

Fun Fact #2: False acacia trees, which now cover most of the island, were planted on Nuku Hiva with the intention that livestock would eat it. Unfortunately, they don't eat it. Also unfortunately, the trees produce large pods with seeds that are scattered on the wind, making their proliferation the floral equivalent of a wildfire. Oh well, another attempt by humans to "fix" nature gone awry.

Jocelyn also gave us a resident's view of what it was like when the first Survivor season was shot in two different bays on Nuku Hiva (Daniel's Bay and Controller's Bay) in 1999. In short, there were good aspects (Wifi was installed on the island so that the producers of the show could communicate easily with the rest of the world) and bad aspects (the two bays and the land surrounding them were off-limits for the duration of the filming).

We stopped for lunch at Yvonne's Restaurant in Hatiheu, where Eric, Morris, and Tom had a pancake breakfast on the day they hiked over the hill from Anaho Bay. Though Sylvia, Debbie and I had declined to make that hike, we eventually got to visit Hatiheu, and eat at Yvonne's, after all. Afterwards, Jocelyn took us to the archaeological site that the guys had visited, and filled us in on all the details as we walked through.



Eric getting the details

Fun Fact #3: Banyan trees like the one below are sacred to the Marquesans and are never cut down. Ancient Marquesans used to stash human skulls among the roots, some of which are still being found today.



Eric and the banyan

Trip #1. We said goodbye to Nuku Hiva on June 11, seven weeks after first arriving. We headed out of Taiohae Bay in the late afternoon, headed for the island of Tahuata, about 85 miles away to the southeast.


Map of the Marquesas

This would be an overnight trip, the first since our Pacific passage. It was nice to be out on the open ocean again, and we had fun trying out our new radar and chartplotter. The night passed uneventfully, and when the sun rose, we could see the dark shapes of the islands of Hiva Oa and Tahuata up ahead.

Mid-morning, we glided into Hanamoenoa Bay on Tahuata. 09 54.5'S, 139 06.3'W

Six boats were already anchored in the bay, so we took a spot on the edge of the pack. The bay is lovely, with clear water and fish that will come to the boat if you feed them. It's like floating on an aquarium.


Hanamoenoa Bay beach

During our time at Hanamoenoa Bay, we went snorkeling and kayaking, and explored the white sand beach, and yes, did some boat projects. We met five sailors on two boats from Norway, a single-handing Swede, a woman from Brazil, a man from Portugal, and a couple of Americans. One afternoon, we all met on the beach for a lunch potluck, which was a lot of fun.



Beach bum

At sunset, four of the boats set sail for Nuku Hiva. Eric conched them all out of the anchorage. We arrived as strangers and left as friends. That's one of the things we love about cruising.



SCOOTS in Hanamoenoa Bay

Trip #2 from the map.
After a wonderful week in Hanamoenoa Bay - which is currently my favorite bay in the Marquesas - we set sail for the island of Fatu Hiva, home of the famed penis rocks, 45 miles way. We had a spirited upwind sail, in 15-20 knots of apparent wind, with 1.5 meter seas, many of which SCOOTS used to wash her bow and the kayak. No worries; Fatu Hiva is also know for its rain.



Arriving in Hanavave Bay
10 27.9'S, 138 40.1'W

We arrived in mid-afternoon, joining five other boats who were already anchored in the part of the bay that has reasonable depths, so we motored to the edge of the pack and anchored in 80 feet. We have lots of room here, which is good, because as the wind funnels up the bay, it sets all the boats to dancing around in the shifting wind.


Fun Fact #4: Hanavave Bay's original French name was Bay of the Penises. When the missionaries came, prudes that they were, they renamed it Bay of the Virgins. I wondered, why virgins? Why not some other, equally Christian-approved name? Well, it has to do with the French language...Bay of the Penises in French is "Baie des Verges"; Bay of the Virgins is "Baie des Vierges." So by misspelling the name by adding one little "I" the missionaries were able to de-phallus the name. But the rocks are definitely still here.



Those famous rocks

As is a cool rock formation that looks like - depending on whom you ask - the Virgin Mary, or the knight from the chalice room in "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade," or the face on Mars, or Jesus, or the devil. An interesting variety of opinions, don't you think? What do you think it looks like?



The rock face
Comments
Vessel Name: SCOOTS
Vessel Make/Model: Able Apogee 50
Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA
Crew: Eric and Vandy Shrader
About: We've been living aboard full time since September 2014. We sailed to Mexico with the 2014 Baja Haha and had fun exploring Mexico until April 2016, when we turned SCOOTS west and headed to the South Pacific. As of late Nov. 2016, SCOOTS and her crew are exploring New Zealand.
Social:
SCOOTS's Photos - Main
3 Photos
Created 13 October 2019
43 Photos
Created 28 September 2019
27 Photos
Created 27 July 2019
1 Photo
Created 15 July 2019
11 Photos
Created 3 July 2019
3 Photos
Created 6 May 2019
13 Photos
Created 4 March 2019
2 Photos
Created 26 November 2018
16 Photos
Created 18 November 2018
11 Photos
Created 27 October 2018
12 Photos
Created 1 October 2018
6 Photos
Created 21 September 2018
9 Photos
Created 19 July 2018
7 Photos
Created 19 June 2018
No Photos
Created 19 June 2018
11 Photos
Created 18 October 2017
7 Photos | 1 Sub-Album
Created 24 July 2017
14 Photos
Created 12 April 2017
35 Photos | 1 Sub-Album
Created 20 March 2017
18 Photos
Created 2 March 2017
19 Photos
Created 16 February 2017
4 Photos
Created 18 January 2017
30 Photos
Created 14 December 2016
29 Photos
Created 5 November 2016
52 Photos
Created 23 October 2016
24 Photos
Created 12 October 2016
49 Photos | 1 Sub-Album
Created 15 September 2016
43 Photos
Created 2 September 2016
46 Photos
Created 4 August 2016
32 Photos
Created 21 July 2016
12 Photos
Created 1 July 2016
15 Photos
Created 20 June 2016
17 Photos
Created 5 June 2016
1 Photo
Created 3 June 2016
45 Photos
Created 11 May 2016
10 Photos
Created 2 May 2016
2 Photos
Created 1 April 2016
13 Photos
Created 22 March 2016
12 Photos
Created 14 March 2016
2 Photos
Created 9 March 2016
5 Photos
Created 19 January 2016
7 Photos
Created 27 December 2015
6 Photos
Created 16 December 2015
No Photos
Created 27 November 2015
4 Photos
Created 1 November 2015
19 Photos
Created 28 July 2015
4 Photos
Created 23 July 2015
6 Photos
Created 11 July 2015
13 Photos
Created 21 June 2015
9 Photos
Created 15 June 2015
12 Photos
Created 28 May 2015
No Photos
Created 28 May 2015
17 Photos
Created 5 May 2015
2 Photos
Created 30 April 2015
35 Photos
Created 24 April 2015
8 Photos
Created 25 March 2015
8 Photos
Created 10 March 2015
49 Photos
Created 14 February 2015
7 Photos
Created 10 February 2015
20 Photos
Created 26 January 2015
24 Photos
Created 20 December 2014
No Photos
Created 20 December 2014
10 Photos
Created 11 December 2014
5 Photos
Created 3 December 2014
11 Photos
Created 14 November 2014
34 Photos
Created 10 November 2014
4 Photos
Created 26 October 2014
4 Photos
Created 26 October 2014
5 Photos
Created 18 October 2014
8 Photos
Created 1 October 2014
16 Photos
Created 1 October 2014
6 Photos
Created 24 September 2014
9 Photos
Created 23 September 2014
8 Photos
Created 21 September 2014
4 Photos
Created 20 September 2014
5 Photos
Created 18 September 2014
5 Photos
Created 10 September 2014
4 Photos
Created 26 August 2014
1 Photo
Created 25 July 2014
2 Photos
Created 14 May 2014
49 Photos
Created 3 November 2013
32 Photos
Created 8 August 2013
Pics from our trip time aboard Scoots in July 2013.
23 Photos
Created 7 July 2013