Steen Rally

Follow us on our sailing adventure from France to Australia

30 December 2015 | Sydney
29 July 2015 | Sydney
15 January 2015 | Sydney
22 December 2014 | Sydney
21 November 2014 | Cairns, Australia
02 November 2014 | Cairns, Australia
21 October 2014 | Port Vila, Vanuatu
01 October 2014 | Fiji
20 September 2014 | Fiji
08 September 2014 | Fiji
24 July 2014 | Neiafu, Tonga
06 July 2014 | Tahaa. French Polynesia
23 June 2014 | Moorea
23 June 2014 | Moorea
15 June 2014 | Papeete, Tahiti
14 May 2014 | Marquesas, French Polynesia

Fiji- Chilling in Savusavu

02 November 2014 | Cairns, Australia
Voahangy
Fiji, Savusavu – Aug 11- 17, 2014

The 3 day passage from Tonga was very nice. Downwind sailing all the way, successful fishing (1 wahoo kept, 2 marlins caught and released), we experienced a few squalls here and there but nothing nasty. Our track took us thru the Lau group of islands on the eastern edge of Fiji, where white sandy beaches and green hills beckoned, but the country’s rules are very strict: all boats must check in a designated port of entry before stopping anywhere. So we pushed on to Savusavu on the northern island of Vanua Levu.

Clearing into Savusavu was very easy, despite the reports of picky officials. We ticked all the boxes: early notice of arrival, coffee and cookies on board… Anne practised her waitress’ skills offering drinks around. We were sprayed for “chickungunya”, asked the usual questions about fresh products, inspected and told they should take some stuff away but they don’t like to do that, so asked that we keep all organic stuff onboard. Customs barely looked at the wine, the frozen meat or the cheese and inspected the boat more out of curiosity than anything else. So we’re all good! The whole process took 6 hours, mostly due to waiting for the officials to come to the anchorage: no one is allowed to go ashore or leave the boat until we’re cleared in, and we had to wait for 2 teams: health and quarantine first, immigration and customs second. It was a Monday morning, the busiest day we were told, and indeed we were boat number 9 on the list of 12! Once cleared, we were offered a mooring by the Copra Shed marina, but as we anchored in 30 meters of water and we had 75 meters of chain down, skipper decided he would lift the anchor only once: to leave Savusavu! So we are sitting at the entrance of the bay, it turns out to be the best spot, the water is still nice and clear enough to make water, we’re far enough away from shore to be free of bugs and we wake up to great views of the mountains and the bay. Hot springs boil out among fractured coral ashore making the beach ashore steamy and somewhat eerie looking, but that’s all part of the charm.

Town is a motley collection of Indian and Chinese small shops, MH supermarkets with everything you could possibly want for, the best find being Savusavu wine and spirits shop that has a fairly large selection of wines from all over the world at quite reasonable prices. I was very tempted to stock up, but as I had just completed the boat inventory and established we had plenty to drink until Australia, I refrained. Also skipper thought we had been lucky to go thru Fiji customs with so much wine already, and doesn’t believe we’ll get away with more. They also have a large deli section with products from the US, Australia, New Zealand which is kind of appealing after weeks of island provisions. If you have a craving for Ghirardelli chocolates, Ocean Spray cranberry juice or fresh feta cheese…this is the place to go. For local stuff, the market is a feast for the eyes. Compared to western fresh markets, the selection is limited: island grown fruits and vegetables (pineapples, bananas, mangoes, cabbage, eggplants, tomatoes, green peppers, bok choy, onions, taro…), spices thanks to the large Indian community and lots of kava! However, what it lacks in variety it makes up for in the freshness of the produce: most of the local stuff is grown in the mountains and sold the same day. The imported products like red pepper or apples are expensive and look quite tired after a long journey thru cold rooms! Beside a small selection in the supermarkets, meat is sold in 2 small “hole in the wall “kind of places: Fiji Meat and Maravu meats. The former has a wide choice of more “gourmet” cuts ( ham, salami, or rib-eye steaks) while the latter is cheaper and offers more “local” fares like chicken giblets, livers and pecking duck

Walking along Savusavu’s main (and only) street feels like being in a technicolour movie, with a myriad of shades and sounds. Native Fijians with dark complexions, bushy hair, bright and perpetual smiles mix with Indians seriously busy running shops and restaurants, some of the women looking exquisite in their brightly coloured dresses. We walk past shops selling Bollywood movies on DVDs as well as (no doubt) pirated versions of western films (judging by the faded makeshift covers), numerous hardware stores, kava saloons displaying “Grog pounding here” signs, and barber shops offering men’s haircuts for FJD2 (A$ 1.20)! Everywhere we smell curry and freshly baked bread, we can’t resist buying rotis in the street for FJD1, while declining spicy nut snacks offered by young men who hover around the bus station. It is a bustling little town, made even more appealing by the presence of the Copra Shed marina who not only facilitates the clearance procedures (contacting and bringing the officials to our boats in their tender) but also offers facilities such as bar, restaurants, rubbish disposal, laundry and a large lawn area for the kids to run around and adults to run yoga classes! As nearly all boat arriving from Tonga, Samoa, or New Zealand make landfall here, it is a place where we met old friends and made new ones. Easy to see how some crew arrived 4 weeks ago and didn’t want to leave!

We organised a field trip with crews from TRIBE, WINDARRA and ONE WHITE TREE (OWT) and took off for a day in a mini bus to tour the island. Our driver, Raj, actually took us on the road leading to Labasa, the big town in Vanua Levu: imagine Savusavu, only 5 times bigger, busier and dustier! The Indian population is much larger there; the main industry is sugar cane. Having lived in FNQ for years, the sight of trucks loaded with sugar cane barrelling down the main street was not such a big deal for us, nor was the line of sugar cane laden trucks in front of the mill, but our US friends screamed excited and amazed when spotting them and the cane train (“look carriage number 9!”), or driving past the sugar mill which was working at full capacity. Had it been a week day, we would have been in for a tour of the mill. It was quick town visit, mostly consisting of a cheap curry lunch followed by a splitting of our group of 15: the men took off looking for boat parts (unsuccessfully) while us girls strolled thru various sari shops and inexpensive toy stalls.

The highlight for Anne was a visit at the Snake Temple, a Hindu temple known as Naag Mandir on the way home: famous internationally (apparently), the temple was build 60 years ago around a natural rock formation shaped like a rising cobra. Hindus from all over Fiji and overseas come here and worship, praying and making offerings to Ganesh, and other deities… The day of our visit, the temple was empty but for one family who performed the ritual of coconut offering, incense burning and praying. I think the kids liked walking up the 108 steps to the altar, which represents the 108 steps to xxx??? We had scheduled another stop at the waterfalls in the thick of the Waisali rainforest reserve, but when the driver mentioned the FJD10 access fee we all baulked. That’s the problem with us, well-travelled yachties: some of us have experienced Niagara Falls in the US, Angel Falls in Venezuela, or Iguacu Falls in Brazil…so to pay FJD150, this Fijian waterfall would have to be pretty spectacular, which according to Raj, it wasn’t. He described it rapids running over big rocks that local kids slide on. Anyway, it was getting late, and we all elected to drive back to the boats before sunset.

Another day saw us attending a cruising seminar hosted by Curly Carswell, a long term Savusavu resident hailing from New Zealand. Organised weekly, this is the opportunity to get firsthand knowledge of Fijian culture: very modest people, Fijians pay much attention to the respect of traditions, particularly in remote villages. Women should dress appropriately, with long skirts and shoulders covering tops. Men should wear long trousers or a sulu (some type of sarong) over their shorts, though they seem to get away with the bare legs more than women! The most important thing when visiting a village is the sevusevu: this is a ceremony where guests (us) are expected to offer a bunch of kava (called Yagoona in Fiji) to the village chief, in exchange for a warm welcome. It is not only poor form to show up empty handed, but can also be seen as offending if a boat anchors off a village and does not even set foot ashore. Armed with this information, we bought 9 bunches of Kava (one for each of the villages we planned on visiting), extra groceries that I packed in individual bags to trade (maybe for lobsters or handicraft?) and stocked up on enough Fiji Bitters to last a couple of weeks. With Malcolm (Terry’s middle son) flying in for a couple of weeks, the last thing we wanted, was to run out while cruising the outer islands… Beside his knowledge of the local culture, Curly has also accumulated a wealth of cruising information over the past 40 years or so, and is happy to share navigation tips, waypoints and itineraries with whoever asks, for a fee smaller than the price of a cruising guide.

By the end of the week, we were all equipped and crew complete. Our cruising permit and domestic clearance out of Savusavu (all free) were all we needed to take off exploring!

Fiji, Savusavu. Du 11 au 17 Aout 2014

La navigation de puis Tonga fut agréable. Vent arrière pendant 3 jours, bonne pêche (1 tazard pour le frigo, 2 marlins relâchés), on a bien essuyés quelques grains ici ou là, mais rien de méchant. Nous sommes passés au milieu des iles Lau, à l’extrême Est de Fiji, ou les plages de sable blanc et les collines verdoyantes étaient très attrayantes, mais la règlementation du pays est très stricte : tous les bateaux doivent d’abord se rendre dans un port d’entrée autorise avant de s’arrêter ou que ce soit. On a donc pousse jusqu’à Savusavu, sur l’ile de Vanua Levu.

On nous avait prévenus que les autorités étaient difficiles, mais les formalités d’entrée à Savusavu se sont passées sans problèmes. On a coche toutes les cases : préavis d’arrivée, café et biscuits à bord…Anne a démontré ses dons de serveuse en offrant des boissons a tout le monde. On nous a traite contre le chickungunya, à coup de fumigation, pose les questions habituelles sur nos produits frais, inspecte le bateau (sommairement) et avise que certaines denrées devraient être confisquées mais les officiers n’aiment pas faire ça (par pitié ?) donc ils nous ont prié de garder toute matière organique à bord. Le douanier a quasiment ignore le vin, la viande surgelée ou le fromage, et a fait le tour du bateau plus par curiosité qu’autre chose. Tout va bien donc ! La procédure a duré 6 heures, passées en grande partie à attendre que les autorités viennent à bord : personne n’avait le droit de mettre le pied à terre ou même quitter le bateau avant d’être « cleared » et il fallait attendre 2 équipes : sante et phytosanitaire d’abord, puis douane et immigration. C’était un lundi matin, apparemment le jour le plus charge, et pour dire nous étions bateau numéro 9 sur une liste de 12 ! Une fois « cleared », la marina du Copra Shed nous a offert un corps-mort mais étant mouille dans 30 mètres de fond avec 75 mètres de chaine, notre skipper a décidé qu’il ne lèverait l’ancre qu’une seule fois : au moment de quitter Savusavu ! Alors nous voilà à l’entrée de la baie, en fait on ne peut pas trouver mieux, l’eau est assez claire pour faire marcher le dessalinateur, on est relativement loin de la berge donc hors de portée des insectes et on se réveille avec une vue imprenable des collines et de la baie. Des sources chaudes bouillonnent à travers le corail sur la rive, enveloppant la plage d’un halo de vapeur, vision quelque peu sinistre mais ça fait partie du charme !

La ville est un mélange hétéroclite de magasins indiens et chinois, des supermarchés MH ou on peut acheter tout ce qu’on veut, et la meilleure trouvaille « Savusavu wine & spirits shop » qui offre une sélection assez variée de vins du monde entier à des prix très raisonnables. J’étais très tentée de faire le plein, mais ayant tout juste fini l’inventaire a bord et déterminé qu’on a encore assez pour la durée du voyage je me suis retenue. D’autant plus que Terry pense qu’on a déjà de la chance d’avoir passé la douane avec autant de vin, et il ne croit pas qu’on puisse s’en tirer avec plus. Il y a aussi une section « deli » pleines de produits américains, australiens, et néo-zélandais ce qui a un certain attrait après des semaines d’approvisionnement dans les iles. Une envie irrésistible pour les chocolats Ghirardelli, du jus d’airelles Ocean Spray ou encore de la feta fraiche…vous savez ou allez maintenant. Pour les produits locaux, le marché est un régal pour les yeux. Compare aux marches occidentaux, la sélection est limitée : des fruits et légumes cultives sur place (ananas, bananes, mangues, choux, aubergines tomates, poivrons, bok choy, oignons, taro…) des épices grâce a la communauté indienne et beaucoup de kava ! Mais ce qui manque en variété, est largement compensé par la fraicheur des produits : la plupart sont récoltés dans les collines environnantes et vendus le même jour. Les importations comme les poivrons rouges ou les pommes coutent chères et ont un air bien tristounet après un long trajet dans des chambres froides. Hormis une petite sélection dans les supermarchés, on trouve de la viande dans 2 échoppes : Fiji Meat et Maravu Meats. La première a un choix plus « gourmet » (jambon, salami ou faux filet). Alors que l’autre est moins chère et offre des morceaux plus basiques tels que gésiers de volaille, foies et canard rôti.

En se promenant dans la rue principale de Savusavu on se croirait sur un plateau de cinéma, enveloppé dans une myriade de couleurs et de sons. Les fidjiens de souche avec leurs peaux sombres, leurs chevelure touffue, et des sourires perpétuellement éclatants se mêlent a des indiens sérieusement occupes à gérer boutiques et restaurants, les femmes sont d’une beauté exquise dans leurs robes multicolores. On passe devant des magasins vendant des DVD de films Bollywood ainsi que des versions piratées de films occidentaux (à en juger par les couvertures délavées), de nombreuses quincailleries, des bars a Kava, et des coiffeurs pour hommes proposant des coupes a FJD2 (1 euro) ! Partout règne l’odeur de curry et de pain frais, on ne peut résister a acheter des rotis sur le trottoir pour FJD1, tout en déclinant les snacks de noix épicées que nous tendent les jeunes hommes autour de la station de bus. C’est une petite ville très animée, rendue d’autant plus intéressante par la présence de la marina Copra Shed qui non seulement facilite les formalités douanières (en contactant les autorités et les acheminant à bord) mais offre aussi des installations telles que bar, restaurants, poubelles, buanderie et une grande pelouse ou les enfants peuvent s’ébattre et les adultes prendre des classes de yoga ! Comme presque tous les bateaux en provenance de Tonga, Samoa ou la Nelle-Zelande atterrissent ici, c’est l’endroit idéal pour revoir des amis ou s’en faire des nouveaux. Je comprends pourquoi tant d’équipages arrives il y a un mois ont du mal à décoller !

Un jour on a organisé une excursion en bus avec les familles de TRIBE, WINDARRA et ONE WHITE TREE (OWT) et sommes partis faire le tour de l’ile. En fait, notre chauffeur, Raj, nous a emmenés sur la route de Labasa, la plus grande ville sur Vanua Levu : imaginez Savusavu, en 5 fois plus grande, plus animée et plus poussiéreuse ! La population indienne y est beaucoup plus importante, l’industrie principale est la canne à sucre. Ayant vécu dans le Far North Queensland pendant des années, la vue de camions charges de canne à sucre fonçant sur la route n’était pas si incongrue, de même pour la longue queue de camions et leurs cargaisons attendant devant la raffinerie, mais nos amis américains eux étaient tout excites a la découverte de la locomotive (« regarde, la voiture numéro 9 ! ») et l’entrée de la raffinerie qui marchait à temps plein. Si on était un jour de semaine on aurait pu faire une visite guidée de la raffinerie. Au lieu de ça, ce fut une visite rapide de la ville, constituant principalement d’un déjeuner « curry » rapide et pas cher suivi d’une séparation de notre groupe de 15 : les hommes sont partis à la recherche de pièces pour les bateaux (sans succès) et les femmes et les enfants se sont balades dans de multiples boutiques de sari et des magasins de jouets pas chers.

L’évènement le plus marquant pour Anne a été la visite du Temple du Serpent, un temple hindou connu sous le nom de Naag Mandir, sur le chemin du retour : De réputation internationale (apparemment), le temple a été érigé il y a 60 ans autour d’un rocher à la forme d’un cobra qui se dresse. Des hindous viennent de tout Fiji et du monde entier pour s’y recueillir, prier et offrir leurs offrandes a Ganesh et autres divinités…Le jour de notre visite, le temple était désert a part une famille célébrant le rituel et offrant noix de coco, encens et prières. Je pense que les enfants ont aimé monter les 108 marches menant à l’autel, un symbole hindou. Nous avions prévu de faire halte à une cascade au fin fond de la réserve de Waisali, mais quand notre chauffeur a mentionné les FJD10 par personne de droits d’entrée, nous avons tous change d’avis. C’est le problème avec des plaisanciers qui voyagent beaucoup comme nous : certains ont vu les chutes du Niagara aux Etats-Unis, Angel Falls au Venezuela ou bien les chutes d’Iguaçu au Brésil…pour FJD150 il aurait fallu que la cascade de Fiji soit spectaculaire, ce qui d’après Raj n'était pas le cas. Il nous l’a décrit comme des rapides coulant parmi de gros rochers ou les gamins locaux s’amusent à glisser. Et puis il commençait à se faire tard et on souhaitait tous revenir aux bateaux avant la nuit.

Un autre jour nous avons assisté à un séminaire de navigation organise par Curly Carswell, un résident de Savusavu depuis longtemps et originaire de Nouvelle Zélande. Ayant lieu toute les semaines, c’est l’occasion d’obtenir des informations sur la culture fidjienne : de nature modeste, les Fidjiens sont très sensibles au respect des traditions, particulièrement dans les villages recules. Les dames doivent s’habiller correctement : jupes longues et épaules couvertes. Les hommes eux doivent porter un pantalon ou un sulu (une sorte de paréo) couvrant leurs shorts, bien que les jambes nues de ces messieurs semblent mieux tolérées que pour nous les femmes ! Le plus important lors d’une visite dans un village est le sevusevu : une cérémonie durant laquelle les visiteurs (nous) sont censés offrir un « bouquet » de kava (appelé ici yagoona) au chef du village, en échange d’un accueil à terre. C’est non seulement malpoli de se pointer les mains vides mais peut carrément être considéré offensant si un bateau mouille en face d’un village sans même se rendre à terre. Munis de ces informations, nous avons acheté 9 paquets de Kava (un pour chacun des villages que l’on comptait visiter), des victuailles supplémentaires que j’ai emballe individuellement pour faire du troc (peut-être pour une langouste ou de l’artisanat ?) et assez de bières Fiji Bitter pour nous durer une quinzaine de jours. Avec Malcolm (le fils de Terry) nous rendant visite pendant 2 semaines, on ne voudrait pas être à court de bières au milieu de nulle part…Hormis sa connaissance inégalée de la culture fidjienne, Curly a également accumule des tonnes d ;information nautiques sur la région depuis une 40aine d’années et partage volontiers des tuyaux sur la navigation , des waypoints et même des itinéraires pour qui le souhaite, tout ça pour une somme bien moindre que le prix d’un guide nautique.

En fin de semaine nous étions prêts : ravitailles et équipage au complet. Une dernière ronde à faire pour obtenir le permis de croisière et la clearance domestique de Savusavu (tous gratuit !) avant de partir à l’aventure !

Comments
Vessel Name: VOAHANGY
Vessel Make/Model: Lagoon 560
Hailing Port: Sydney
Crew: Terry, Voahangy, Marc, Anne Steen
About:
Terry, 71, skipper, ex-pilot, surfer, aerobatics champion, can fix anything, never sea sick, loves a beer, hates the cold, is happiest anchored off a deserted beach. [...]
VOAHANGY's Photos - Main
84 Photos
Created 20 November 2014
2 glorious months, cruising various parts of Fiji. So many different experiences in one country: lush rainforests, colourful indian towns, blue lagoons, traditional villages, great fishing, fancy resorts... And the best part was sharing the cruising with family and friends. Can't beat Fiji with company! Here is a collection of our favourite moments (and there are a few!!!)
1 Photo | 8 Sub-Albums
Created 12 October 2014
Some of the whales actions we witnessed in Tonga, to read with the Whales action post by Anne!
7 Photos
Created 1 October 2014
Whale watching, snorkelling, bonfires, making new friends...One of the most remote and austere destination, far away from big tourism, with friendly people holding on to their traditions. Weather a bit chilly, but who cares???
46 Photos
Created 10 September 2014
49 Photos
Created 25 July 2014
15 Photos
Created 25 July 2014
9 Photos
Created 25 July 2014
38 Photos
Created 30 June 2014
20 Photos
Created 30 June 2014
72 Photos
Created 28 June 2014
55 Photos
Created 23 June 2014
27 Photos
Created 15 May 2014
37 Photos
Created 11 May 2014
40 Photos
Created 30 March 2014
1 Photo | 3 Sub-Albums
Created 15 March 2014
The time finally came to leave...a month of celebrations and sadness!
30 Photos
Created 5 March 2014
Another holiday within the holiday! Spent 13 fantastic days in Whistler, British Columbia joined by Aussie friends David and Denise. First time on skis for them, perfecting camps for Marc and Anne, loads of fun for everyone.
70 Photos
Created 8 February 2014
Nothing like having family and friends coming for a visit in the sun. Lots of eating, drinking, swimming, laughing...showing everyone our small paradise.
99 Photos
Created 30 January 2014
End of school year in Puerto, many get togethers before flying off to Paris for a family Christmas.
25 Photos
Created 23 January 2014
Day of the Dead festival, a friend visiting from Australia, Anne participating in her first martial arts tournament,...As usual a lot of eating and socialising!
40 Photos
Created 2 December 2013
68 Photos
Created 6 November 2013
Having visitors means putting on our tour guide hat "Voahangy & Co in Mexico", much exploring and eating: ruins, cenotes, beaches, villages, markets,... . I shared Mexican cooking lessons and was repaid with Dutch baking classes from our French guest. We ate a lot of cakes this month! So much sugar, no candies needed for Halloween this year, just parties...
74 Photos
Created 1 November 2013
This is the slowest month of the year in Mexico: hurricane threats, hot and humid weather, torrential rains drive the tourists away and confine the rest of us indoors. It poured for 22 days non stop! We still managed a dive (in the rain) for Father's Day, a day of all you can eat and drink at the local resort for Terry's birthday, and as usual lots of cooking and eating. Just on cue, the weather cleared at the end of the month for the arrival of Marie Suzanne, a French girlfriend. So lots of touring and catching up. Celebrated Mexican Independence Day all month long (it seems), eating black beans and pork verde!
47 Photos
Created 10 October 2013
No excursions this month. Just hanging around Puerto Aventuras, school, friends, ...Sat thru a couple of storms, torrential rains, big winds...Nowhere to go so more time spent in the galley and writing about it!!!
33 Photos
Created 12 September 2013
Holiday month for everyone: visitors from the USA, kids in and out, parties, US National Day celebration, French National Day celebration, Tulum for a night (bliss...) The start of a new food blog meant a month spent in the galley experimenting. Not much in terms of local food, mostly home cooked French. Chocolate cake anyone?
41 Photos
Created 24 August 2013
Holiday Seasons with old and new friends, provisioning and preparing to leave the USA...
54 Photos
Created 16 July 2013
End of school year performances, lots of baking/cooking for school festivities, Marc hospitalised, first tropical storms testing our nerves, road trip to Belize... Eat ceviche, my latest food addiction!!!
15 Photos | 1 Sub-Album
Created 8 July 2013
Lots on! An interesting road trip to the Chiapas region, wonderful ruins of Palenque, green and lush Tabasco, Anne's birthday, Cozumel by boat, Kids sports graduation...Eat chilaquiles, breakfast with a difference.
26 Photos | 3 Sub-Albums
Created 2 July 2013
Settling down and mixing with the locals: kids are off to school, birthday parties, more of Tulum, unexpected reunion with fellow cruisers. Eat: black bean soup!
30 Photos
Created 2 July 2013
Not much tourism this month. We finally made the decision to stay for the rest of the year. So it's head down with school, get together with cruising friends ( they're passing thru while we stay behind) and switching to "landlubber's" mode. Resolved to eat at home more often, back to healthier diet.
19 Photos
Created 13 June 2013
Exploring the Yucatan peninsula by car, to Uxmal ruins and Merida. More of Tulum. Marc's Birthday. Try Flyboarding. Join in the local community of Puerto Aventuras. Xel-Ha. Discover Playa del Carmen. Eat nachos.
27 Photos | 2 Sub-Albums
Created 13 June 2013
Landfall in Isla Mujeres, find our way around our new home in Puerto Aventuras, excursion to Coba ruins, discover Tulum, swim with dolphins, eat tacos...
31 Photos | 2 Sub-Albums
Created 13 June 2013
Our last few weeks (even months) have been spent in Puerto Aventuras, Mexico. Not much cruising for us, more like enjoying company of new friends, safety of a protected harbor, and relaxing for a while, knowing we don't have to go anywhere for a while...
25 Photos
Created 2 April 2013
2 weeks in an island where time has stood still for 50 years! Road trip La havana - Vinales- Cienfuegos - Trinidad - La Havana. Cruise down the west coast, beautiful beaches, good fishing, diving,... Warm waters at last!!!!
3 Sub-Albums
Created 5 February 2013
To be enjoyed while reading the post!
43 Photos
Created 31 December 2012
Exploring Charleston and Savannah
1 Photo | 2 Sub-Albums
Created 27 December 2012
2 weeks shore leave, driving to Shenandoah National Park: lots of hiking, eating "country style" food, looking for bears, avoiding bears...Long drive across to Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, to visit the Wrights brothers memorial and Cape Hatteras.
28 Photos
Created 25 December 2012
Caught up with friends, left the boat on display at the 2012 Boat Show, toured historic downtown and US Naval Academy, watched a football game...welcome to the US sailing capital!
51 Photos
Created 25 December 2012
Unforgetable summer cruising around Block island, Nantucket, and Martha's Vineyard.
1 Photo | 3 Sub-Albums
Created 16 December 2012
46 Photos
Created 17 October 2012
A leisurely cruise from New York to Newport. Quite anchorages, fresh ocean breeze, ...a million miles away from Big City living!
37 Photos
Created 5 September 2012
July and September in the Big Apple. Cruise, Eat, Shop, Walk,...Look at some of our best memories (work in progress, I am still sorting thru thousands fo photos!)
1 Photo | 4 Sub-Albums
Created 3 September 2012
Museums, memorials, parks, bike trails...the most photogenic city.
85 Photos
Created 15 August 2012
First voyage in July, on our way to Washington DC. Passing thru quaint and historical towns, sampling crabs and oysters in hot summer nights... Returned in September, enjoying all Annapolis has to offer (well, nearly), and the spectacle of autumn foliage.
20 Photos
Created 15 August 2012
Where there are some seriously clever people!
22 Photos
Created 15 August 2012
29 Photos
Created 20 July 2012
Shore leave: Make believe, dreams come true, thrills, fast food...Anything goes here!!!
42 Photos
Created 20 July 2012
Welcome to America! Our port of entry, last moments with friends, base for a mini-refit, and our first taste of the USA...
18 Photos
Created 30 June 2012
59 Photos
Created 31 May 2012
17 Photos
Created 25 May 2012
33 Photos
Created 25 May 2012
52 Photos
Created 25 April 2012
19 Photos
Created 14 April 2012
30 Photos
Created 14 April 2012
28 Photos
Created 30 March 2012
28 Photos
Created 5 March 2012
40 Photos
Created 12 February 2012
36 Photos
Created 12 February 2012
25 Photos
Created 28 January 2012
49 Photos
Created 8 January 2012
37 Photos
Created 4 January 2012
40 Photos
Created 28 December 2011
What happens during a transat?
40 Photos
Created 14 December 2011
44 Photos
Created 19 November 2011
22 Photos
Created 19 November 2011
40 Photos
Created 19 November 2011
13 Photos
Created 19 November 2011
18 Photos
Created 19 November 2011
30 Photos
Created 17 November 2011
21 Photos
Created 30 October 2011
18 Photos
Created 22 October 2011
24 Photos
Created 1 October 2011
21 Photos
Created 8 September 2011

S.V VOAHANGY

Who: Terry, Voahangy, Marc, Anne Steen
Port: Sydney