Speakeasy, Over The Horizon

The Voyages of Mark & Deanna Roozendaal

24 November 2016 | 26 41.15'S:153 7.72'E, Mooloolaba, Australia
13 November 2016 | 25 54.12'S:153 01.72'E, Tin Can Bay, Australia
12 November 2016 | 25 31.69'S:152 57.91'E, Fraser Island, Australia
31 October 2016 | 24 45.38'S:152 23.72'E, Bundaberg, Australia
30 October 2016 | 23 52'S:153 55'E, On Passage - Noumea, New Caledonia to Bundaberg, Australia
29 October 2016 | 23 28'S:156 47'E, On Passage - Noumea, New Caledonia to Bundaberg, Australia
28 October 2016 | 22 57'S:159 54'E, On Passage - Noumea, New Caledonia to Bundaberg, Australia
27 October 2016 | 22 40'S:163 13'E, On Passage - Noumea to Australia
26 October 2016 | 22 22'S:166 10'E, On Passage - Noumea to Australia
18 October 2016 | 22 16.60'S:166 26.40'E, Noumea, New Caledonia
17 October 2016 | 21 37'S:168 13'E, between Vanuatu and New Caledonia
14 October 2016 | 19 31.57'S:169 26.66'E, Port Resolution, Tanna I, Vanuatu
14 October 2016 | 19 31.57'S:169 26.66'E, Port Resolution, Tanna I, Vanuatu
14 October 2016 | 19 31.90'S:169 26.98'E, Mt. Yasur, Tanna I, Vanuatu
12 October 2016 | 19 31.58'S:169 29.65'E, Port Resolution, Vanuatu
09 October 2016 | 20 14.36'S:169 46.63'E, Aneityum, Vanuatu
03 October 2016 | 20 14.36'S:169 46.63'E, Aneityum, Vanuatu
02 October 2016 | 19 39'S:172 03'E, On Passage from Fiji to Vanuatu
01 October 2016 | 18 43'S:174 16'E, On Passage from Fiji to Vanuatu
27 September 2016 | 17 40.88'S:177 23.16'E, Vuda Marina, Fiji

Giant Clams and Lepers

06 September 2016 | 17 26.50'S:178 57.09'E, Makogai Island, Fiji
Mark
Early yesterday morning we sailed away from one of our favourite villages, Savusavu, across the Koro Sea towards the main island of Fiji, Viti Levu. Our goal was Makogai island, about three quarters of the way across. It was a 50 mile trip and, with brisk beam winds and rough seas in the forecast, we were pretty sure that it was enough for one day.

The weather did not disappoint! Right from the start we had 17-22 knots of wind on the beam with short steep seas. This would have been a lot of fun, except that Dee and I both had wicked hangovers from a margarita party on Moonshadow the night before. We do have a rule that we don't drink much the night before a passage, but we completely forgot about that for some reason.

With very sore heads and queasy stomaches, we sailed towards our destination, bouncing mightily along in the rough water. We traded off helm duties so that the other one could close their eyes and get some rest from time to time. Moonshadow stayed in Savusavu, so even if they had a headache they had the luxury of waiting it out in peace. Agility was sailing with us and I'm sure they weren't feeling to perfect either.

Finally, we reached the island, threaded our way through coral heads protecting the pass, and anchored in a beautiful bay in front of a giant clam breeding station. Well, at least it was a clam breeding station until the most powerful cyclone in South Pacific history, Winston, made a direct hit in March 2016. Very few of the buildings are left and nearly all of the trees have been stripped of their leaves. With over three hundred kilometer winds, Winston leveled every strong buildings and uprooted trees. Even with the rapid tropical plant growth, after six months it still looks very beaten around here.

On shore we performed our very first Sevusevu ceremony. This is a long standing and important Fijian tradition where a visitor presents a bundle of kava root to the chief's representative and asks for permission to anchor in their bay, swim in their waters, walk on their trails, etc. All parties are sitting cross legged on the ground and the kava is put in front of the head man. If he picks it up, he has accepted you, and you are welcome to the village and are under his protection. This is a serious procedure here. After a reasonably lengthy speech in Fijiian where he was telling us that he would now take care of us we were free to explore his domain. Whenever we anchor anywhere in rural Fiji we need to find the local village that "owns" the water & land and perform sevusevu with them before we do anything else. The alternative, in days past, is that if we weren't welcome we could end up being the next meal!

That was all yesterday√Č

Today, since we all felt much better, we hiked ninety minutes through a very overgrown trail to the village on the other side of the island. Again, because of cyclone Winston, virtually all of the houses are now just piles of timber and most of the villagers live in Rotary or Unicef tents. It's pretty sad. The one bright spot is a brand new four room school that was just opened last week to replace the one that was destroyed. One of the teachers gave us a tour and was clearly proud that they, with the help of the Sea Mercy Foundation, were able to get their school reopened so quickly.

Another interesting thing about visiting a rural village is the dress code! Again, this is a very serious deal here. Women have to have their shoulders covered and be wearing a dress, no pants, that cover their legs to below the knees. Nobody can wear a hat, sunglasses, or carry any bag on their back. Men must wear a shirt and a sulu covering their legs. A sulu is basically a long wrapped piece of fabric that reaches below the knees. Women wear them all over the world, but here in Fiji the men were them too. The locals will never tell you if you offend them by dressing improperly, but we have been warned countless times to obey the dress code whenever we visit one of the rural villages. At first, it felt kind of strange for me to run around in a sulu, but the teacher we met was, of course, wearing the same thing! My sulu is plain blue and with my white shirt it turned out I was wearing the school uniform!

After a long trek back to our anchorage, we explored some of the abandoned and wrecked buildings that were part of the huge leper colony that was here until 1969. Five thousand lepers lived their lives here at any given time in a full village including hospital, theatre, etc. Up the hillside, behind the anchorage, is a large overgrown cemetery where they all rest now. The jungle has reclaimed much of this huge cemetery, but the more I looked, the more I found crosses and headstones disappearing into the bush in all direction. Dee stayed behind as I think that she was little freaked out!

Tomorrow we will be on the move again, crossing the last of the rough Koro sea and then threading our way inside the reefs on the North shore of Viti Levu.
Comments
Vessel Name: Speakeasy
Vessel Make/Model: 2007 Manta IV 42' Catamaran
Hailing Port: Victoria, BC, Canada
Crew: Mark & Deanna Roozendaal
About:
In 2005 we were lucky enough to be able to take a one year sabbatical where we sailed from Victoria BC to Mexico and Hawaii in our Catalina 42. We had a fantastic time! As soon as we returned home, we started dreaming about our next trip. [...]
Social:
Speakeasy's Photos - (Main)
3 Photos
Created 1 March 2016
For our newest pictures, please look on the right hand side of our page under FAVOURITES and click on "2015+ Photo Gallery". This will take you to Flickr where we now store all of our photos.
No Photos
Created 19 April 2015
Yelapa is a small village on the South shore of Banderas Bay, near Puerto Vallarta. Unless you own a hummer, is only accessible by boat which gives it a nice laid back vibe
10 Photos
Created 20 March 2015
Our furthest South point this year.
13 Photos
Created 20 March 2015
Manzanillo is a huge commercial port between Puerto Vallarta and Zihuatanejo. Not that much tourism here which makes it a very authentic Mexican city
5 Photos
Created 20 March 2015
Pictures from Tenacatita and a few other anchorages in the area.
17 Photos
Created 20 March 2015
A few pictures from our Christmas visit to Barra & Melaque
11 Photos
Created 19 January 2015
A quick visit to the small fishing village of Chamela
5 Photos
Created 28 December 2014
Isla Isabella is an island about 20 miles offshore Mexico, between Mazatlan and Puerto Vallarta. it is a nesting ground for a number of sea birds and has been the subject of several documentaries. The birds and lizards on the island have no fear of humans.
26 Photos
Created 16 December 2014
13 Photos
Created 16 December 2014
9 Photos
Created 16 December 2014
From Bahia Santa Maria to Cabo San Lucas
15 Photos
Created 14 November 2014
Sailing from Turtle Bay to Bahia Santa Maria, Mexico
12 Photos
Created 14 November 2014
We participated in the rally again this year. Here are a few pics from the pre-start party, the start, and the first leg to Turtle Bay, Mexico. Credit to Dave Tolman for most of the pictures.
25 Photos
Created 12 November 2014
We spend the better part of a week first in Catalina Harbor and then in the opposite side of the isthmus in Two Harbors
7 Photos
Created 17 October 2014
Our time in the big city
4 Photos
Created 17 October 2014
A few pics from our brief stop in this richie rich tourist town
4 Photos
Created 17 October 2014
Morro Bay, California
15 Photos
Created 2 October 2014
11 Photos
Created 25 September 2014
Big waves at Morro Bay from a low pressure system that rolled through North of us
10 Photos
Created 25 September 2014
7 Photos
Created 25 September 2014
Our side trip to the Delta and Sacramento from the San Francisco Bay
27 Photos
Created 9 September 2014
20 Photos
Created 21 August 2014
27 Photos
Created 21 July 2014
Prior to our departure, we hauled out at Canoe Cove, BC, Canada.
13 Photos
Created 26 June 2014
"Speakeasy" is a 2007 Manta 42 MKIV Catamaran. We purchased her in 2013 from the original owners. Manta's come fairly well equipped from the factory for offshore cruising. We will be adding the rest of the necessary equipment.
23 Photos
Created 10 February 2013
1 Photo | 2 Sub-Albums
Created 15 May 2011
1 Photo | 15 Sub-Albums
Created 1 December 2006
1 Photo | 9 Sub-Albums
Created 1 December 2006
1 Photo | 2 Sub-Albums
Created 1 December 2006
25 Photos
Created 1 December 2006
1 Photo | 5 Sub-Albums
Created 1 December 2006

Speakeasy - Manta 42 Catamaran

Who: Mark & Deanna Roozendaal
Port: Victoria, BC, Canada

Where are Mark & Deanna?