Umnyama Blog

24 December 2020
24 December 2020
02 December 2020
01 December 2020
01 December 2020
30 November 2020
30 November 2020
30 November 2020
02 August 2020
07 July 2020 | Grenada
30 June 2020 | North Atlantic Ocean
21 June 2020 | South Atlantic Ocean
18 June 2020 | South Atlantic Ocean
06 June 2020
21 April 2020 | St Helena
02 April 2020 | St Helena

Barbados (in English)

24 December 2020
Dick van Geldere
So we had to go to Barbados to get visas for the US, because we are going to sell Umnyama there. With an ESTA, a visa waiver, you can only enter the country with an official carrier, not with your own boat. The US Embassy in Grenada does not do visas, the Embasssy in Curacao and in Nassau in the Bahamas were closed, so we had no choice but to go to Barbados, where we could by exception make an appointment after a long wait, a lot of paperwork and a lot of money.
Barbados is a hundred miles east of the rest of the Caribbean islands, nice after a transatlantic maybe, but not if you're already in the real Caribbean. With the hurricane season ending at the end of November, the trade winds are starting to blow again, so a trip eastward is no mean feat, against wind, current and waves.
So I asked for advice on Facebook's Grenada Cruisers Information. Many reactions, of which here are a few examples:
- "Wait for a no-wind day. The trades and seas will bash you mercilessly, heading east to Barbados. "
- "Fly, it will be easier and probably cheaper in the long run."
- "Brace!"
- "Hey Dick, don't worry since you have great cat."
So when a weather window appeared with a little less wind, we left on December 8th.
Close hauled to Bequia, then tacked to Barbados. The plan was to sail upwind in two days - 100 miles as the crow flies = 220 miles through the water. Gentlemen don't sail upwind, we know. But there was so little wind that we soon decided to motor straight into the wind. 21 hours later we were in Bridgetown, the capital of Barbados, flying the yellow Q flag. Because of Covid we unfortunately had to clear in there (and not much easier in St Charles), so in the large seaport where the cruise ships normally moor. Now there was only one, the Freedom of the Seas, without guests, of course, and which, moreover, soon left again, to drift aimlessly off the coast together with other gigantic cruise ships, in order to save port dues.
After a slow but very friendly customs clearance, without PCR test and without quarantine, as we came from ultra low risk Grenada, we anchored in Carlisle Bay. And we've been there for two weeks now, close to town and close to the Barbados Yacht Club. More on that later.
On December 23, Monique had her interview at the US Embassy and my interview will follow on January 4. Hopefully departure on January 11, 2021, to sail via Martinique and Antigua to the Bahamas and then to Florida to sell the boat in March? 1400 miles to go, downwind ;-)
So we celebrate Christmas and New Year here, without children or friends from the Netherlands, unfortunately, who we send the best wishes from our luxurious Covid-free existence here.

Barbados

24 December 2020
Dick van Geldere
We moesten dus naar Barbados om visa voor de US te krijgen, want daar gaan we Umnyama verkopen. Met een ESTA, een visa waiver, mag je alleen het land in met een officiële carrier, niet met je eigen boot. De US Embassy in Grenada doet geen visa, de Embasssy in Curacao en in Nassau in de Bahamas waren gesloten, dus er zat niets anders op dan naar Barbados te gaan, waar we bij uitzondering een afspraak konden maken na een lange wachttijd, veel papierwerk en veel geld.
Barbados ligt honderd mijl ten oosten van de rest van de Caribische eilanden, leuk na een transatlantic misschien, maar niet als je al in de werkelijke Carieb bent. Nu het hurricane season eind november is afgelopen beginnen de passaatwinden weer flink te waaien, dus een trip oostwaarts is geen sinecure, tegen wind, stroom en golven in.
Dus maar eens advies gevraagd op Facebooks Grenada Cruisers Information. Gelijk tal van reacties, waarvan hier een paar voorbeelden:
- “Wait for a no-wind day. The trades and seas will bash you mercilessly, heading east to Barbados.”
- “Fly, it will be easier and probably cheaper in the long run.”
- “Brace!”
- “Hey Dick, don’t worry since you have great cat.”
Dus toen zich een weather window voordeed met even wat minder wind zijn we vertrokken op 8 december.
Hoog aan de wind tot aan Bequia, toen overstag richting Barbados. Het plan was om op te kruisen in twee dagen - 100 mijl hemelsbreed = 220 mijl door het water. Maar er was zo weinig wind dat we al snel besloten om regelrecht tegen de wind in te gaan motoren. 21 uur later waren we in Bridgetown, de hoofdstad van Barbados, met de gele Q vlag in het want. Vanwege Covid moesten we helaas daar inklaren (en niet veel eenvoudiger in St Charles), dus in de grote zeehaven waar normaal de cruiseschepen liggen. Nu lag er maar een, de Freedom of the Seas, zonder gasten uiteraard en die bovendien al snel weer vertrok, om samen met andere giga cruiseschepen doelloos voor de kust te liggen drijven, om havengeld uit te sparen.
Na een trage maar uiterst vriendelijke inklaring, zonder PCR test en zonder quarantaine, want we kwamen uit ultra low risk Grenada, gingen we voor anker in Carlisle Bay. En daar liggen we nu al twee weken, dicht bij de stad en dicht bij de Barbados Yacht Club. Daarover later meer.
Op 23 december had Monique haar interview op de US Embassy en mijn interview volgt op 4 januari. Hopelijk dan vertrek op 11 januari 2021, om via Martinique en Antigua naar de Bahamas te varen en dan naar Florida om de boot te verkopen in maart? Nog 1400 mijl te gaan...
Kerst en Oud & Nieuw vieren we dus hier, zonder kinderen of vrienden uit Nederland helaas, die we wel de beste wensen sturen vanuit ons luxe Covidvrije bestaan hier.

From Grenada to Carriacou and Barbados

23 December 2020
Dick van Geldere

After months in Grenada, Dick four and a half months and me exactly three months, the time has come, we're leaving! Monday November 23 is the day. We first go to Carriacou, a small island north of Grenada, sailing 35 miles close hauled. We were able to convince Karl, the Irish sailor from Australia, to go there too. He has to overcome a hangover from the exuberant weekend, but even leaves an hour earlier than us.
I paddle to my favorite beach, Grand Anse, for a last walk and swim the last laps there. When I pull my kayak into the water, I traditionally do what is wrong: I bend, pull and turn, all at the same time. And there goes my back again. The trip to Carriacou will not be a happy first sailing trip for me. I lie flat on the couch and every movement hurts. Dick sails, enjoys the speed, the wind and the open water. We do a radio check with Karl, and stomp through rough water. We make some good hits, and have a speed of more than 11 knots upwind and have to tack the last miles.

We arrive at Carriacou almost at the same time, Karl anchors just a little earlier. We anchor in the bay at Hillsborough, the main town of Carriacou. Tyrell Bay is more sheltered, but overcrowded and is also called the parking lot. Many boats that have been there for months and sailors who live there almost permanently. The bikes are put on land and we hit the road, and I cycle every day. Up and down to Tyrell Bay, to Paradise Beach, and also to High North, which is pretty tough, because some steep parts and the rusty folding bike has only three gears left. Carriacou is small and quiet, with no big chain hotels like the other islands, and little traffic. Opposite Paradise Beach is the beautiful Sandy Island, where sailing yachts throng to moor next to this sandbank with palm trees. It is indeed a nice spot, but you can walk from one side to the other in five minutes. Then rather look at this beautiful island from the other side, where you can walk and cycle.

After more than a week we decide to move to L’Esterre Bay off Paradise Beach where it is a bit calmer in terms of wind, and yes, it is a beautiful place, with a cozy bar / restaurant, run by Allison. She is from Carriacou, but has lived in New York for over 20 years and knows how to run a good business. Once a week the brushes and pots of paint come on the table and pieces of wood, and all sailors can get to work artistically. Paint the name of your boat, and then put the final artsy product on the wall at the bar. And in the meantime there is of course drinking and eating.

I get what I want in terms of sports and exercise. Yoga on the beach of Tyrell Bay, after I first paddled to the shore and cycled a bit. Some more walks and also a long bike ride with Karl through the north of the island. Dick should not think about all those activities in the heat. The heat has been hard on him all over the world - his thermostat is not working properly.
In the meantime, studies are underway on how to get to Barbados, which is where we unfortunately have to go to get our US visas - 120 miles ENE upwind, which can be very unpleasant. Many advised us against it and told us to fly, a few said that it is possible. Dick studies hard on the weather reports, and eventually there is a chance to go, with a less powerful trade wind from the east. We leave after having been on Carriacou for more than two weeks and head for Barbados, after a special meeting at the fuel jetty in Tyrell Bay.

I had already seen the somewhat dilapidated catamaran in Tyrell Bay. Three years ago, when we had sailed all over the Caribbean, and we made another stop at Bequia Island on the way back to Curaçao. We go for a drink at Plantation Hotel, and a bunch of men next to our table are cheerful and noisy and one of them says something comical in Afrikaans, to which I respond. Surprised that I can understand him, we start talking. Turns out his wife is lying flat on the bed, with a lot of back pain. Sounds familiar to me, just in the process of healing from acute spinal hernia. I paddle to their boat in the dark, find a very bedraggled woman in a lot of pain, flat on the couch. I give her some advice and some hefty painkillers. The next morning I paddle past again. The woman, thanks to painkillers, feels much better. She takes my hand and thanks me. I am her angel who saved her - well no, it's small and blue and it's called Oxycodone! Three years later in Tyrell Bay I have already recognized the boat, and at the fuel dock I think I see the couple. When I speak to them I hear the unmistakable South African accent. They are indeed the couple from three years ago. They look at me somewhat vague and do not recognize me immediately. But when I bring up her back pain from three years earlier, she smiles, takes my hand and says again, "You were my angel and you saved me then!" As we sail away from the fuel dock, we pass their boat. She is waiting there with a large conch shell in her hand and starts blowing the conch as we sail past. A sea salutation, how nice. The sailing world can sometimes be very small!

Van Grenada naar Carriacou en Barbados

23 December 2020
Dick van Geldere

Na maanden in Grenada geweest te zijn, Dick vierenhalve maand en ik precies drie, is het zover, we vertrekken! Maandag 23 November is het zover. We gaan eerst naar Carriacou, een klein eiland ten noorden van Grenada, 35 mijl varen aan de wind. We hebben Karl, de Ierse zeiler uit Australië, kunnen overtuigen om daar ook naar toe te gaan. Hij moet even een kater van het uitbundige weekend overwinnen, maar vertrekt zelfs een uur eerder dan wij.
Ik peddel nog even naar mijn favoriete strand, Grand Anse, voor een laatste wandeling en de laatste baantjes zwemmen daar. Als ik mijn kayak het water intrek doe ik klassiek dat wat fout is: ik buk, trek en draai, allemaal op hetzelfde moment. En daar gaat mijn rug weer. De trip naar Carriacou wordt voor mij geen vrolijke eerste zeiltrip. Ik lig plat op de bank en elke beweging doet pijn. Dick zeilt, geniet van de snelheid, de wind en het open water. We doen een radiocheck met Karl, en stampen voort over onstuimig water. We maken wat rake klappen, en hebben even een snelheid van ruim 11 knopen hoog aan de wind en moeten het laatste stuk kruisen.
We komen bijna tegelijk aan bij Carriacou, Karl ankert net even eerder. We gaan liggen in de baai bij Hillsborough, de hoofdplaats van Carriacou. Tyrell Bay is wel meer beschut, maar overvol en wordt dan ook wel de parkeerplaats genoemd. Veel boten die er al maanden liggen en zeilers die er bijna permanent wonen. De fietsen gaan de kant op, en ik fiets er op los. Mijn rug is inmiddels weer beter. Op en neer naar Tyrell Bay, naar Paradise Beach, en ook naar High North, wat aardig pittig is, want wat steile stukken en de verroeste vouwfiets heeft nog maar drie versnellingen. Carriacou is klein en rustig, zonder grote hotelketens zoals op de andere eilanden, en er is weinig verkeer. Tegenover Paradise Beach ligt het mooie Sandy Island, waar zeiljachten zich verdringen om toch maar bij deze zandplaat met palmbomen te liggen. Het is inderdaad een mooi plekje, maar je loopt in vijf minuten van de ene kant naar de andere. Dan maar liever naar dit mooie eilandje kijken vanaf de overkant, waar er gelopen en gefietst kan worden.
We besluiten na ruim een week te verkassen naar Paradise Beach waar we iets rustiger liggen qua wind, en ja, het is een prachtige plek, met ook nog eens een gezellige bar/ restaurant, gerund door Allison. Ze is van Carriacou, maar heeft ruim 20 jaar in New York gewoond en weet hoe je een goede zaak moet runnen. Een keer per week komen de kwasten en verfpotten op tafel en stukken hout, en alle zeilers kunnen artistiek aan de gang gaan. Naam van je boot schilderen, en daarna gaat het plankje aan de muur bij de bar. En ondertussen wordt er natuurlijk gedronken en gegeten.
Ik kom wel aan mijn trekken qua sport en beweging. Yoga op het strand van Tyrell Bay , nadat ik eerst naar de kant heb gepeddeld en een stukje gefietst heb. Nog wat meer wandelingen en ook nog een lange fietstocht samen met Karl via het noorden van het eiland. Dick moet niet denken aan al die activiteiten in de warmte. De warmte valt hem al de hele wereldreis zwaar - zijn thermostaat wekt niet goed.
Ondertussen wordt er druk gestudeerd op hoe in Barbados te komen, waar we dus helaas heen moeten om US visa te verkrijgen - 120 mijl ENE tegen de wind in, wat bijzonder onplezierig kan zijn. Velen raadden het ons af en adviseerden te gaan vliegen, een enkeling zei dat het wel kan. Dick studeert hard op de weerberichten, en uiteindelijk is er een kans om te gaan, met even een minder krachtige passaatwind uit het oosten. We vertrekken na ruim twee weken op Carriacou te zijn geweest en gaan richting Barbados, na eerst nog een bijzondere ontmoeting bij de brandstofsteiger in Tyrell Bay.
Ik had de wat verlopen catamaran al zien liggen in Tyrell Bay. Drie jaar geleden, toen wij door de hele Carieb hadden gezeild, en we op de terugweg richting Curaçao weer een stop maakten bij Bequia eiland. We gaan een borrel drinken bij Plantation Hotel, en een stel mannen naast onze tafel zijn vrolijk en luidruchtig en een ervan zegt wat komisch in het Afrikaans, waar ik op reageer. Verbaasd dat ik hem kan verstaan, raken we aan de praat. Blijkt dat zijn vrouw plat op bed ligt, met enorm veel rugpijn. Klinkt mij bekend in de oren, zelf net aan het genezen van een acute rughernia. Ik peddel in het donker naar hun boot, vind een zeer verkreukelde vrouw met veel pijn, plat op de bank. Ik geef haar wat advies, en forse pijnstillers. De volgende ochtend peddel ik weer langs. De vrouw, dankzij pijnstillers, voelt zich veel beter. Ze grijpt mijn hand en bedankt mij. Ik ben haar engel die haar gered heeft - nou nee, het is klein en blauw en heet Oxycodon! Drie jaar verder in Tyrell Bay heb de boot al herkend, en bij het fuel dock denk ik dat ik het echtpaar zie. Als ik ze aanspreek hoor ik het onmisbare Zuid-Afrikaanse accent. Ze zijn het. Ze kijken wat wazig naar mij, maar herkennen mij niet direct. Maar als ik over haar rugpijn van drie jaar daarvoor begin, lacht ze, grijpt mijn hand en zegt weer: “Je was mijn engel en je hebt mij toen gered!”. Als we weg varen van het fuel dock, komen we langs hun boot. Zij staat daar met een grote Conch hoornschelp in haar hand te wachten en begint op de schelp te blazen als we langs varen. Een zeegroet, hoe leuk. De zeilwereld kan soms heel klein zijn!

Monique in Grenada (English)

02 December 2020
Dick van Geldere
After four months of care and arranging matters  for my mother in the Netherlands, and after a long flight from Amsterdam, via London and Barbados, I finally fell back into Dick's arms, in Grenada. A bit illegal, because I am officially quarantined despite two negative Covid tests. The first ten days my only getaway is to the beach - walking and swimming, while keeping a good distance from everyone. "Every disadvantage has its advantage", said Cruijff, our most famous soccer player, and my advantage is that Dick has to do the shopping in those days! After ten days of isolation, I can get back to work, and six of the seven days we go to Grenada Marine to work on the boat.
We quickly get into a routine, where Dick sleeps in, I run on the beautiful endless beach of Grand Anse or seriously swim laps in warm, clear water.
Then with lunch and drinks in the cool-bag to the boat, where we  work and sweat. It is sticky warm, and it is hard to work inside the boat. I'm mainly scrubbing and cleaning all the covers of the couches and beds, and endlessly scratching bird droppings from the boat, while Dick does the more intelligent work.
Grenada is a lovely island, green, mountainous, steep valleys and narrow, winding roads. The capital St George reminds me a lot of the capital of Sierra Leone, Freetown. An old center, steeply stuck to a slope, with old roads that are way too narrow, where only one-way traffic is possible. Our small rental car can barely climb some steep roads, and I leave those parts to Dick.
The Grenadians are very nice and friendly people. You are greeted everywhere, and during my daily walk to the beach I am sometimes greeted with a friendly "Here you are again, I already missed you yesterday"!
We live in a mini apartment, small, but with everything in it.  It is a wonderful place to live, while we work on the boat for weeks.
There is also plenty of entertainment, with the other sailors that Dick has spent endless hours with on St Helena, and who are now also in Grenada. Movie nights, oven dishes prepared by Karl, the Irish sailor, birthday celebrations for the crew of the Valentina, including a children's party at the Bowling Alley! Sunday afternoons are often spent at the Aquarium restaurant, on a beautiful beach, with views along the coast towards Grand Anse and St George and with live music. What do you mean Corona, what do you mean lockdown. We very much realize that we are incredibly lucky to be on an island like Grenada. No new Corona cases, they only had about 30, until it was decided to allow international flights from the USA and Canada in again. Yes, and that quickly goes wrong. Almost every week a new case, someone who has broken the rules, always someone who has just arrived. The Canadian flights will therefore be stopped at the end of November.
Worse than Covid here is a Dengue epidemic in the Caribbean, with more deaths in St Vincent than by Covid. Less in Grenada, although a few of our sailing friends club also got sick.
Umnyama goes into the water in mid-November, we sail the first miles again and stay another week at my favorite beach Grand Anse. Then the anchor is raised and the first real full day is sailed to the island of Carriacou. More about that in the next blog.

Monique in Grenada

01 December 2020
Dick van Geldere
Na vier maanden zorg en regelwerk voor mijn moeder in Nederland, val ik uiteindelijk na een lange vlucht van Amsterdam, via London en Barbados, weer in de armen van Dick, in Grenada. Een beetje illegaal, want ik ben officieel in quarantaine, ondanks twee negatieve Covid testen. De eerste tien dagen is mijn enige uitje naar het strand - lopen en zwemmen, terwijl ik ruim afstand houd van iedereen. ”Elk nadeel heb zijn voordeel”, zei Cruijff, en mijn voordeel is dat Dick in die dagen de boodschappen moet doen! Na de tien dagen van isolatie kan ik weer aan de bak, en gaan we zes van de zeven dagen naar Grenada Marine, om aan de boot te werken.
We komen snel in een routine, waarbij Dick uitslaapt, ik op het prachtige eindeloze strand van Grand Anse hardloop of serieus baantjes trek in warm, helder water.
Daarna met lunch en drinken in de cool-bag naar de boot, waar er hard gewerkt en gezweten wordt. Het is plakkerig warm, en binnen in de boot is het amper uit te houden. Ik ben vooral bezig met schrobben en schoonmaken van alle overtrekken van de banken en bedden, en eindeloos vogelpoep van de boot krabben, terwijl Dick het meer intelligente werk doet.
 
Grenada is een heerlijk eiland, groen, bergachtig, steile dalen en smalle kronkelende wegen. De hoofdstad St George doet mij erg denken aan de hoofdstad van Sierra Leone, Freetown. Een oud centrum, steil aan een helling geplakt, met veel te smalle oude wegen, waar alleen eenrichtings verkeer mogelijk is. Ons kleine huurautootje kan amper sommige steile wegen op, en die stukken laat ik dan ook aan Dick over.
De Grenadians zijn bijzonder aardige en vriendelijke mensen. Je wordt overal begroet, en tijdens mijn dagelijkse wandeling naar het strand word ik soms begroet met een vriendelijk “Daar ben je weer, ik had je al gemist gisteren“ !
 
We wonen in een mini appartementje, klein, maar wel met alles er op en er aan. Het is een heerlijke woonplek, terwijl we weken aan de boot werken.
Er is ook genoeg vertier, met de andere zeilers waar Dick eindeloos mee op St Helena heeft gelegen, en die nu ook in Grenada zijn. Movie nights, ovengerechten die door Karl, de Ierse zeiler worden bereid, verjaardagen van de crew van de Valentina, incluis een kinderfeest op de Bowlingbaan! De zondagmiddag wordt vaak doorgebracht bij het restaurant Aquarium, aan een mooi strand, met uitzicht langs de kust richting Grand Anse en St George en met live music. Hoezo Corona, hoezo lockdown. We beseffen heel erg dat we ongelofelijk veel geluk hebben om op een eiland als Grenada te zijn. Geen nieuwe Corona gevallen, ze hebben er maar een kleine 30 gehad, tot dat besloten wordt om internationale vluchten vanaf de USA en Canada weer toe te laten. Jawel , en dat gaat al snel fout. Bijna elke week weer een nieuw geval, iemand die zich niet aan te regels heeft gehouden, altijd iemand die net is aangekomen. Per eind November worden de Canadese vluchten dan ook gestopt.
Erger overigens dan Covid hier is een Dengue epidemie in de Carieb, met meer doden in St Vincent dan door Covid. Minder in Grenada, hoewel ook in onze zeilvrienden club er een paar ziek werden.
 
Umnyama gaat half November het water in, we zeilen de eerste mijlen weer en blijven nog een week bij mijn favouriete strand Grand Anse liggen. Dan gaat het anker omhoog en wordt de eerste echte volle dag gezeild, naar het eiland Carriacou. Meer daar over in de volgende blog.
Vessel Name: UMNYAMA
Vessel Make/Model: Catana 42
Hailing Port: Amsterdam
Crew: Dick van Geldere & Monique Nagelkerke
About: Dick, a retired surgeon from The Netherlands, and his wife Monique, a MSF humanitarian (Medecins sans Frontieres/ Doctors without Borders), are sailing around the world in their catamaran. They started in France in 2016. In the hurricane/cyclone seasons they do not sail but work with MSF.
Extra: UMNYAMA = RAINBOW in South African Xhosa language - the language of Nelson Mandela. The sailing and the voyage are fine. The problems of a brand new boat, however... Read all about it.
UMNYAMA's Photos - Main
9 Photos
Created 24 December 2020
11 Photos
Created 23 December 2020
10 Photos
Created 1 December 2020
14 Photos
Created 1 December 2020
Boat items.
17 Photos
Created 2 August 2020
7 Photos
Created 2 August 2020
12 Photos
Created 7 July 2020
9 Photos
Created 6 June 2020
14 Photos
Created 7 March 2020
7 Photos
Created 5 February 2020
11 Photos
Created 5 February 2020
3 Photos
Created 29 December 2019
5 Photos
Created 6 August 2019
11 Photos
Created 27 June 2019
7 Photos
Created 25 June 2019
9 Photos
Created 25 June 2019
8 Photos
Created 5 June 2019
6 Photos
Created 1 May 2019
7 Photos
Created 21 April 2019
9 Photos
Created 13 April 2019
5 Photos
Created 13 April 2019
5 Photos
Created 31 March 2019
4 Photos
Created 9 February 2019
Roadtrip with the boys
15 Photos
Created 6 December 2018
5 Photos
Created 13 October 2018
4 Photos
Created 8 October 2018
Cave diving with sardines and three whales under the dinghy
7 Photos
Created 9 September 2018
5 Photos
Created 18 August 2018
13 Photos
Created 8 August 2018
13 Photos
Created 8 August 2018
14 Photos
Created 3 July 2018
8 Photos
Created 3 June 2018
2 Photos
Created 2 April 2018
12 Photos
Created 25 March 2018
3 Photos
Created 21 March 2018
3 Photos
Created 19 February 2018
4 Photos
Created 4 February 2018
20 Photos
Created 17 December 2017
2 Photos
Created 24 April 2017
8 Photos
Created 16 January 2017
4 Photos
Created 23 December 2016
3 Photos
Created 3 December 2016
3 Photos
Created 28 November 2016
Met nieuwe opstappers, Theo, Jet en Marij voeren we met weinig wind van Porto naar Faro.
6 Photos
Created 12 November 2016
Met twee 'opstappers' Piet Hein en Harm staken we de Golf van Biskaje over en rondden we Kaap Finisterre.
3 Photos
Created 12 November 2016
Met twee 'opstappers' Piet Hein en Harm staken we de Golf van Biskaje over en rondden we Kaap Finisterre. In Porto bosbranden en bemanningswissel.
20 Photos
Created 12 November 2016
Dit zijn wat foto's van de bouw van het schip. We reisden geregeld naar La Rochelle. Het hele proces werd begeleid door mijn vriend van de kleuterschool Chris Minnee (Jan de Boer catamarans) die ik door mijn overstap naar de catamaranwereld na 60 jaar weer ontmoette...
23 Photos
Created 11 November 2016
16 Photos
Created 10 July 2016