Footnotes from Water Music

Sicily to New Zealand on Water Music Wauquiez Centurion 45

Vessel Name: Water Music
Vessel Make/Model: Wauquiez Centurion 45
Crew: Stephen Foot, Grace Foot, Gabrielle Clarke, Mark Watson
14 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
14 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
13 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
11 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
11 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
11 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
10 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
09 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
08 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
07 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
06 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
04 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
02 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
01 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
30 April 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
29 April 2019 | Galapagos- Pacific Ocean
28 April 2019 | Galapagos- Pacific Ocean
26 April 2019 | Galapagos- Pacific Ocean
17 April 2019 | Galapagos- Pacific Ocean
14 April 2019 | North Pacific Ocean
Recent Blog Posts
14 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean

Land at last!

After 17 days at sea, we made our landfall in Fatu Hiva and spent a couple of days in this glorious paradise. It is one of the iconic anchorages in the Marquesas - with huge hills and cliffs all around. One of our pilot books says you almost expect to see King Kong poking his head around the hills. [...]

14 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean

Nous sommes arrivee

After 3000 Nautical Miles and 17 days, we arrived in Paradise - also known as Fatu Hiva in the Marquesas just before 1200 (local boat time). We have managed to get ourselves thoroughly confused over local time, but reckon that is 1900 UTC.

13 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean

Fairground spinnaker ride!

We have had the spinnaker up since early this morning (everyone knows how I love a spinnaker!) the seas have been quite big and the wind fairly boisterous and we have been surfing down these waves doing a 8/9 knots but once even hitting 12 knots. Helming this was far too much for poor George to handle, [...]

11 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean

Sun, sun sun

A quiet day on Water Music as we start the countdown to Fatu HIva. As at Happy hour last night, the cockpit instruments eventually started to tell us how far we have left to run. For reasons known only to Raymarine, the cockpit dial will only record a maximum distance of 409.50 Nm. We passed through [...]

11 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean

Fish

For the last day's run we are posting twice. One devoted to the OB's admiration of the autopilot, the other (this one) picking up any highlights from yesterday.

11 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean

An ode to unrequited love

Dear George

Land at last!

14 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
Stephen
After 17 days at sea, we made our landfall in Fatu Hiva and spent a couple of days in this glorious paradise. It is one of the iconic anchorages in the Marquesas - with huge hills and cliffs all around. One of our pilot books says you almost expect to see King Kong poking his head around the hills. That is exactly what we felt. We walked to the waterfall - through a lovely wild flower strewn path and then got driven by a kamikaze driver inland to the next door village (makes the route 2 driver on the Grenada dollar bus look like an outing from the local old people's home) - which gave us the opportunity to see the interior of this beautiful island. He felt the need (which we understood) to stop at the various shrines to thank Virgin Mary and St Christopher for his continued deliverance. We felt he could have achieved the same result by slowing down. Scenery akin to some of the Canary Islands, but more dramatic. In the evening we had dinner in one of the locals houses (there are no restaurants or bars here) and then went to the local village hall, where they were practicing for the Dance competition across Polynesia next month.

The dance involved about 80 people, drums and a ferocious, transvestite, dance master. He was chastising them all for lack of commitment. We thought it was wonderful. As I commented to an Argentinian off the next door boat - it was extraordinary how the women moved so gracefully - hips gyrating whilst the upper body was utterly still. I was particularly taken by the size of some of these women - who had clearly been at the sweets between meals. The Argie reaction was to nod and agree, but to quietly point out that the particular person i was referring to (whilst dressed in a skirt) was actually a man.

We loved Fatu Hiva but at some point knew we would have to leave and check in to French Polynesia - so we made the 40 mile broad reach alongside another yacht. Arriving in Atuona in Hiva Ao, we cleared customs, did some re-provisioning and had a very good dinner before leaving on Saturday morning for a small bay on the next door island - Tahuata. Tahuata delivered what it promised - with a stunning beach and then very hospitable people. Today we have hiked between villages - mercifully the cafe owner took pity on us and delivered us back to the boat after rather a good lunch - it took 40 minutes by car! We are now into island hopping mode - snorkels are out, bbq is about to get used again and the water maker is running for its life.

The routine on board is different - but the weather remains warm and balmy.

Plans are to stay in Marquesas for another week or so and then head to the Tuamotos. They are apparently right off the beaten track.

Nous sommes arrivee

14 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
Stephen
After 3000 Nautical Miles and 17 days, we arrived in Paradise - also known as Fatu Hiva in the Marquesas just before 1200 (local boat time). We have managed to get ourselves thoroughly confused over local time, but reckon that is 1900 UTC.

The last 24 hours saw us doing more sailing manoeuvres than the preceding 2.5 weeks. We ended up doing three gybes, hoisting and dousing spinnakers and even trimming sail!

The Bay of Virgins is an incredibly beautiful and unspoilt place and we are looking for some exploration tomorrow. It doesnt look like there are any shops here - but loads of fruit in people's gardens and we have been asked by three sets of people to have dinner in their houses tomorrow evening.

Not surprisingly, there is no internet access at all and it would appear that phone signal is, at best, weak.

Havent yet worked out who is standing which watches tonight - we wont know what to do with 7 hours unbroken sleep!

Thank you following us, probably wont post daily from now on.

Stephen, Grace, Brian, Gabrielle

Fairground spinnaker ride!

13 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
Grace
We have had the spinnaker up since early this morning (everyone knows how I love a spinnaker!) the seas have been quite big and the wind fairly boisterous and we have been surfing down these waves doing a 8/9 knots but once even hitting 12 knots. Helming this was far too much for poor George to handle, but Stephen was loving it music blaring out (not quite sure how much Brian appreciated it during his nap!) We realised that we would need to jybe at least once to make our waypoint so prepared to take the spinnaker down in a building and rather gusty sea - this is when Stephen remembered what happened when they kept the spinnaker up too long on the way into Antigua .....it was not pretty but eventually it came down we could have done with Charlie Foot on the foredeck! Stephen now too exhausted to write this blog but wanted to mention that Water Music has just completed 9,952 miles of downwind sailing since leaving Lanzarotte!

All being well we should reach our intended destination of Fatu Hiva (Oliver Rutter look this up it is an island about as far away from anyway as you can get!) we have been warned that we should legally enter the Marquessas at another island about 60 miles further north called Hiva Oa but that would involve a windward sail back to Fatu Hiva so we are going to chance it.!

Can't wait for a chance to have a good shower on the level and see if our legs still work on dry land!

A demain (as we think they might say in French Polynesia!

Sun, sun sun

11 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
Stephen
A quiet day on Water Music as we start the countdown to Fatu HIva. As at Happy hour last night, the cockpit instruments eventually started to tell us how far we have left to run. For reasons known only to Raymarine, the cockpit dial will only record a maximum distance of 409.50 Nm. We passed through that barrier and are now down to 270Nm left to run. At this rate, we will arrive early in the morning at Fatu Hiva. We dont know if we will be allowed ashore there or not as it is not an official port of entry and have no idea what, if anything, we will find by way of shops, launderettes, banks or internets.

Back to today, we are sailing along with our spinnaker up in relatively flat seas and wondering whether we should carry the kite overnight. The consensus is to take it down and we will douse it before sunset.

Fish

11 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
Stephen
For the last day's run we are posting twice. One devoted to the OB's admiration of the autopilot, the other (this one) picking up any highlights from yesterday.

Well the day started in much the same way as previous ones. The calm was punctuated by cries of Fish!, but always with the same result. Whatever beast it was on the end, we seem to lose them as we were just going too fast to reel them in. More often that not the strikes came in twos, including one in the middle of Listen With Norm.

We were just about to give up for the evening, when the lines started to run again. One fish quite quickly jumped off, but the second one stayed with us. We switched the engine on and engaged reverse gear in an attempt to slow down the boat and slowly but surely reeled the fish in. When she got close up to the transom, we started to see the size of the beast and it tried on several occasions to wrap itself around rudder, keel and prop shaft. After another 20 minutes, both skipper and fish were exhausted and, with the help of the gaff, we landed the fish in the aft cockpit well. that was the idea, but sadly rather optimistic as a place to accommodate this fish, which was comfortably 5 feet long. We again reached for "Mediterranean Fishes" for identification - ruling out Wahoo and Marlin along the way. We had landed ourselves a pretty large Swordfish.

Gutting, cleaning took place in the near darkness, but we at least had some to go into what would have been a vegetable curry. After a bumpy night last night, we separated the fish into steaks, curries and ceviche. Probably enough food to give us sustenance to Tahiti and certainly more than enough to Marquesas.

Back to the more daily life, at the time of writing we have under 500 miles left to run and are enjoying a growing moon at night. Last night the moon set at midnight and was bright enough to light most of the sky. Sunset continues to be a really special time of day - from now on it wont be disturbed by the high pitch whine of either fishing reel.

An ode to unrequited love

11 May 2019 | South Pacific Ocean
Brian
Dear George

Will you permit me, with these simple words of adulation, to confess to you my secret and embarrassing infatuation? If I am able to convey to you my heartfelt consternation, that would suffer me great joy and so much felicitation.

Alexa's quick internet access once held my admiration, with her ever open ear and a voice worthy of adoration. But out in the middle of the ocean, with no wi-fi indication, I now recognise just how fickle was my juvenile infatuation.

You modestly demand not less than ten volts application, heading and wind-vane transponder supplied indication, reading the flux compass and with much data interpolation, you steer us on a set course or angle-to-wind reconciliation.

The speed and accuracy of your endless calculation deserve, and earn, the highest academic accolation. With nonchalant disregard of wind or wave agitation, your diligence, and persistence, are beyond repudiation.

Your virtues of endurance and fidelity, in combination with rudder instruction provided without complication compared with humans, it is an impressive compilation, that inspires awe and holds me in raptuous captivation.

While others are: eating, sleeping or lost in contemplation; reading books or gazing up at the celestial constellation; reasonably distracted by ' a fish on the line' justification; you alone always concentrate on guiding us to salvation.

Whipping, splicing and lashing are my daily preoccupation - sail trimming and helming are way above my pay gradation. Alone on night watch i attempt to engage you in conversation, but am frustrated by your apparent deafness to my saluation.

I think that your mute condition is cruel condemnation to an existence of lonely, silent and solitary isolation. But with a verbal interface permitting externalisation; perhaps you would consider expressing reciprocation.

Programmed with few messages, and no power of creation, 'Drive stopped' has been your only on-screen notification. Are you closing down in order to shut out my invocation, or offering me your tiller and hope of mutual gratification?

I like a companion who will join me in noontime libation, but care not for someone who is interested in royal baby titivation. I value someone who believes in silence is worth preservation, and reckon 'two out of three ain't bad' as your qualification.

By name and nature you are of male characterisation. But could it be that George is really an abbreviation? And as Georgina you might possess female fascination, and, therefore, a more appropriate gender identification.

it is possible that you would chose 'G' as a modern nomination. What would that suggest in an age of LGBTIQ classification? However I am not concerned about your sexual inclination, content to offer to be just a loyal and loving platonic relation.

I beg, do not dismiss my feeling without contemplation, for I live in hope, although also cautious trepidation, that somehow you will be able to indicate confirmation, comprehension, acceptance and romantic reciprocation.

I remain, sir or madam as the case maybe, your devoted and besotted servant - OB (Written out here in the South Pacific sea phantising about you and me).
Water Music's Photos - Main
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